Boat building in progress

Discussion in 'Metal Boat Building' started by evantica, Feb 15, 2010.

  1. troy2000
    Joined: Nov 2009
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    troy2000 Senior Member

    Good to see you still making progress; this is another of those threads that I somehow missed for a while.
     
  2. Arvy
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    Arvy Senior Member

    Same here, missed it too while browsing through the forum, don't know why actually :)
     
  3. thedutchtouch
    Joined: Feb 2010
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    thedutchtouch Junior Member

    i'll take a stab at explaining this since it seems brent hasn't come back to reply-
    stainless steel sockets at the waterline- sockets around the outside of the boat facing down, allowing you to put a support leg in place from a dinghy while the boat floats at high tide. for more on "sheer legs"/ Shear legs read this link: http://www.boatdesign.net/forums/metal-boat-building/shear-legs-metal-boats-26241.html

    12mm acorn nuts- an acorn nut is like a bolt, but it is closed on one end, (google "acorn nut" for a picture) welding these in "flush" would mean cut a small hole in the hull, and weld it inside so it basically ends up looking like you have a small hole that is sealed on the back side, and is threaded, allowing you to screw a bolt or section of threaded rod into it. install these so that the threaded rod forms a 90 degree angle with the previously mentioned support legs (sheer legs).

    sorry i am at work and can't draw it out but hopefully that made at least a little bit of sense.
     
  4. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Old Woodbutcher

    I know nothing of steel boat-building. But I like the looks of her so far. I hope she will be strong and seaworthy. :cool:


    PS This is an acorn nut.:
     

    Attached Files:

  5. Submarine Tom

    Submarine Tom Previous Member

    Acorns are a nice touch. Watch out for "bottoming" if your bolt is a touch too long.

    Lock washers (or split washer as they are sometimes called) can be a good idea as it's hard to see if they're backing off.

    Blue LocTite can also be used while still being able to remove the thing while red Loctite will bond it forever.

    -Tom
     
  6. wardd
    Joined: Apr 2009
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    wardd Senior Member


    going to upset a lot of people here but lock washers don't lock

    think about it, when you torque a bolt down on a lock washer it's now a flat washer
     
  7. Submarine Tom

    Submarine Tom Previous Member

    It most certainly is flat wardd, you are absolutely correct. You are also correct that they do not lock.

    I'm not going to argue with you there.

    -Tom
     
  8. hoytedow
    Joined: Sep 2009
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    hoytedow Old Woodbutcher

    Wingnuts, however, will haunt this forum forever.
     
  9. evantica
    Joined: Feb 2010
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    evantica Senior Member

    Hi. ANd thanks for comments, appriciate it! Yes you're right "Arvy" about the stringers, these where real hard to bend, and pull exactly. I don't know how important this is? But they are welded in place as good as i could, about strenght I see no problem. Don't know how much the pic shows... But at the "rear" end of her, she's stiff as a rock ANd I do belive I could have drop her for some serious hight, into the concrete and not much would have happen. I'm personally pleased with the development, And she will not be a fancy looking ocen boat, I lay my "Powder" on the sea worthness and strenght, and safety. But I do like the look of her. reminds of an ol' timer oceanboat (I think!) Keep up the comments... Sincerely: Cpt. Hakan on his way to Cape Horn soon...
     
  10. evantica
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    evantica Senior Member

    I forgott to mentioned. I'm real pleased with the "Hinges" where to lift the boat. As seen in pic. # 1. I've tried this and worked perfectly in a mobile crane. Mention this as a tip for future builders?!
     
  11. evantica
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    evantica Senior Member

    about the stainless sockets, yes I know what you're saying & thanks for telling. But I think I will do somthing to attache them in my hinges (as mentioned, where to lift the boat) purhapse some "telescopic" bars?
     
  12. peter radclyffe
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    peter radclyffe Senior Member

     
  13. evantica
    Joined: Feb 2010
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    evantica Senior Member

    radclyffe. "it might be better if you look at this another way, or drop it from a great height , then you will have to look at it another way" sorry but didn't get the message here??? I meant if the stringers wasn't bend that exactly, I (!) do not see the problem with this? And I meant she is strong enough. so please explain what you're after with this comments, I honestly don't know!
     
  14. peter radclyffe
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    peter radclyffe Senior Member

    perhaps i misunderstood you, are you talking about dropping your boat
     

  15. evantica
    Joined: Feb 2010
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    evantica Senior Member

    NO! I meant she feels like she is strong enough, for no matter what (with reservation!)
     
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