Block/Running Rigging Help

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by jtremolo, May 18, 2009.

  1. jtremolo
    Joined: May 2008
    Posts: 18
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    Location: Davenport, Iowa

    jtremolo Junior Member

    I'm finishing up the rigging design beach cat. I need some help on choosing blocks and a rigging set up. Mainsail area 59.5 ft^2 I was going to use a 4:1 main sheet without a traveler, a 3:1 main outhaul and a 4:1 boom vang. My question is, does this set up sound about right? Also, which of these blocks would be the best buy, or should I consider another.

    Lewmar 30mm Synchro blocks
    Harken Bullet Blocks

    lastly these handle a max of 5/16" line, I was wondering if this large enough, especially on the main sheet.

    Thanks for all your help,
    Jordan
     
  2. alan white
    Joined: Mar 2007
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    Location: maine

    alan white Senior Member

    Vang and outhaul sound okay, but with only 60 sq ft of main, 3:1 is more than enough purchase, 4:1 being too slow.
    Line size could be 1/4" for vang and outhaul. 5/16" is okay for the sheet but 3/8" whould be more comfortable.
     
  3. jtremolo
    Joined: May 2008
    Posts: 18
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    Location: Davenport, Iowa

    jtremolo Junior Member

    Thank you for your help. Do you have any recommendations as far as what blocks would be good to use? (brands/series not types of blocks eg. Harken Bullet blocks, Lewmar Synchro Blocks)
     
  4. bistros

    bistros Previous Member

    I'd agree on the vang & outhaul, but probably take the main down to 2:1 if center sheeting - or 1:1 if using an end boom split bridle. I sheet 124 sqaure feet 1:1 on my boat with the end boom split bridle - the long lever arm negates the need for mechanical purchase in the blocks. It sure is responsive and never seems too much to handle. I'm not a kid anymore and have a little arthritis in my shoulder.

    Given the small sail area, this may be a single hander, and if so, there aren't a lot of extra arms around, so making do with one on the tiller and one for the sheet (and everything else!) means short travel works best. Otherwise you end up using your teeth and wishing you had more fingers.

    --
    Bill
     
  5. alan white
    Joined: Mar 2007
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    Location: maine

    alan white Senior Member

    I'm inclined to agree that 2:1 would be fine though I can't see 1:1 with 124 sq ft. That had to have taxed the old biceps.

    jtremelo, blocks can be cheap or expensive, low friction ball/rollers or plain bearing. I like simple things and I don't race seriously. So I use plain bearing blocks, which are more reliable if requiring a bit more energy to overcome that extra friction.
    Harken stuff is state of the art, and the price shows it. Ronstan is (or at least historically has been) a decent standard block for a good price. Shaefer is also good, and available both plain and with rollers.
    My own blocks are teak/bronze oval (traditional going way back). They work fine.
    I will say this: If you ask the salesman, he'll tell you things that would cause you to believe your boat wouldn't even float without titanium double torlon roller graphite caged teflon coated super duper blocks at $50-$100 apiece.
    Unless you're racing, it really doesn't matter as long as the manufacturer has been around awhile and the load rating is adaquate.
     

  6. Landlubber
    Joined: Jun 2007
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    Location: Brisbane

    Landlubber Senior Member

    I agree, do not go 1:1, there is no rest for the wet and soggy hands, and I can guarantee no one runs 120 sq ft sail 1:1 if the sheeting is not on a long end boom setup, which most sailboats are.....I sailed Contenders for too long to know that is simply crap!
    2: 1 or 3: 1 is adequate, 3 being more comfortable and still fast, certainly no need for ball race blocks either, plain blocks, light weight stainless steel sides and about 30 to 45mm sheaves are plenty.
     
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