Blackrock 24 (Build)

Discussion in 'Wooden Boat Building and Restoration' started by LP, Mar 12, 2013.

  1. LP
    Joined: Jul 2005
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    Location: 26 36.9 N, 82 07.3 W

    LP Flying Boatman

    Egads, you're going to make me get out my calculator. :D I'll maybe look at stiffeners in way of the tank bays, then.

    Thanks for the sponge tip.
     
  2. LP
    Joined: Jul 2005
    Posts: 1,414
    Likes: 58, Points: 58, Legacy Rep: 584
    Location: 26 36.9 N, 82 07.3 W

    LP Flying Boatman

  3. LP
    Joined: Jul 2005
    Posts: 1,414
    Likes: 58, Points: 58, Legacy Rep: 584
    Location: 26 36.9 N, 82 07.3 W

    LP Flying Boatman

    The V-berth

    A trio of storage lockers under the berth.

    IMG_0270.JPG IMG_0269.JPG IMG_0268.JPG

    Some forward foolishness. "Haven't you ever heard of pour in foam?" I'm targeting 25 cubic feet of floatation tucked away it various areas of the hull. My plan is to get enough floatation to float all of the lead I'll be using and a little extra. The wood should take care of itself.

    IMG_0273.JPG

    Current status. I'm smoothing the glass tapes before coating the area with epoxy. The access panels still need grips for opening. The grips could end up being finger holes of a simple loop of lanyard. I'm exploring ideas for a lanyard based hinge for the access panels that are easily disconnected so the panels are held close or can be set aside.

    I may end up modifying the forward bulkhead to allow for adding rake to the mast. Most likely, I'll wait for sea trials before making those kind of changes. It's good to have a plan though.

    IMG_0295.JPG
     
  4. LP
    Joined: Jul 2005
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    Location: 26 36.9 N, 82 07.3 W

    LP Flying Boatman

    Backward (Aftward) Progress or Going Forward in the Aft Quarters

    Aftward goings on.

    Under the cockpit progression. (cooler stowage)

    IMG_0274.JPG IMG_0283.JPG IMG_0285.JPG

    Fin bolts counterbored and wing carry though spar. Oh wait, it's a boat so it's just a silly floor. :eek:

    IMG_0284.JPG

    The cockpit. Also, final coat of epoxy in aft most frame bay. The next one forward is also ready.

    IMG_0297.JPG IMG_0298.JPG
     
  5. mihari
    Joined: Sep 2009
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    Location: Greece

    mihari Junior Member

    Great work!
     
  6. LP
    Joined: Jul 2005
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    Location: 26 36.9 N, 82 07.3 W

    LP Flying Boatman

    Thanks for the comment, Mihari.

    Progress has slowed for the summer. Too many other things to be doing. I'm selling my 16 foot Meadowbird. http://www.boatdesign.net/forums/wo...ion/do-bottoms-really-need-painted-43834.html. It was my first build and has turned 11. It's a hard decision, but I've run myself out of room. Three full size boats is too many.

    My second build is in need of some new varnish in areas. http://www.boatdesign.net/forums/boat-building/putting-all-together-15377.html Truth be told, I skipped some finish details and need to complete those before bad things start to happen. I need to complete those details before getting it on the water this year.

    Various household projects need to be completed along with paint and varnish on a kayak project. The eagerness to start a new build left several incomplete projects and now that the build is not so new, it's easier to tear away and get some other things done. Actually, it's been a nice break from the complexities of the 24 footer. A coat of varnish here, sealing fastener holes there, the scale is much smaller and a bit of a vacation from the big project. The sailing adventure with the 16 footer in the Outerbanks of North Carolina was quite enjoyable, too.

    Regarding Blackrock though, I've given up on trying to store the spars inside the boat so this lets me look at some other less complex rigs than the balance lug. My initial thoughts were towards a sprit boomed type of plan to take advantage of its self banging qualities. This has lead to a sprit boom that is more of a half a wishbone to a possible a full wishbone boom. I'm still sorting out the stails so I'll be curious to see what developes. My original plan was to also have birds mouth masts, but my plan now is to go with hollow square section masts that will have cheeks from the partners to the step to round them out and allow them to rotate. The boom design requires a rotating mast. The square section is the easiest of the hollow sections to build and it has the advantage of the smallest exposed section. It is also advantageous for mounting the boom and other hardware.

    That's all for now. It's the summer slowdown so once other projects are done, I'll be getting back on the Blackrock. Happy summer sailing to all. :cool:

    image.jpg
     
  7. Jamie Kennedy
    Joined: Jun 2015
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    Location: Saint John New Brunswick

    Jamie Kennedy Senior Member

    Nice design and nice work. Enjoy your summer.
     
  8. LP
    Joined: Jul 2005
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    Location: 26 36.9 N, 82 07.3 W

    LP Flying Boatman

    Thanks, JK. Back atcha.


    BTW. That's the lighthouse at Cape Lookout. South end of Core Sound and the Outerbanks.
     
  9. LP
    Joined: Jul 2005
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    Location: 26 36.9 N, 82 07.3 W

    LP Flying Boatman

    I've been hitting it off and on through the summer. One of the areas I've been working is the last three frame bay that needed smoothing and sheathing. To save pixels, I put together a collage of photos in a single photo to show the stages from bare work to sheathed and structured.

    1) bare and smoothed hull.
    2) sheathed
    3) bunk structure
    4) upper support and corner hatch supports
    5) sushi break. :D
    6) seat back support
    7) seat back support, again I guess
    8) mid-span hatch supports
    9) hatches

    It took me a while to finally concede to a lamination schedule for bilges in the central three frame bays. I plan to store gear directly on the hull in the bilges so I felt addition protection and strength should be incorporated. Ultimately, I ran 12" wide 27 oz. 45/45/90 triax at the turn of the bilge. This was also done in the forward hull sections as I had to deal with material thinning due to a hard corner in the hull and the fairing process. It's a bit of an impromptu bilge stringer for a major portion of the length of the hull. On top of this, I ran a full coverage layer of 7 oz. cloth from the sheer to keel (thingy). Two additional layers of 7 oz. cloth was from the triax to the the keel. The keel to hull joint has two staggered layers of the 12" triax (the center board side has three) and the hull to frame joints have a double layer of biax tape in the bilge storage areas (single above). Yeesh, I feel like I'm building Fort Knox. Fortunately, this is all down low in the boat the weight is positioned advantageously. It was great to finally get this area of the hull beyond the rough stages. The to do list is getting shorter as I anticipate work on the topsides.
     

    Attached Files:

  10. LP
    Joined: Jul 2005
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    Location: 26 36.9 N, 82 07.3 W

    LP Flying Boatman

    Under the galley.

    Another collage. This one is under the galley area. So much work and so little change visually.

    A quick run down:

    1) Raw hull with some minor grinding done. I was going to smooth the hull while inverted thinking all of the debris would simply fall to the floor to be cleaned up. Wrong. All of the debris when right into my eyes, regardless of whether I was wearing safety glasses or not. Glasses and dust aren't compatible anyways. A minute into the process dust forms a blinding layer on my glasses every time. :mad:

    2) all smoothed and ready for glass.

    3) & 4) Same photo basically. Filleted and taped. Note the 12" triax on the bilge.
    4) Prepped for sheathing.
    5) Sheathed.

    As mentioned in the previous post, I have great anticipation work working the topsides. I am trying to keep to motivation for interior work going. I've got a plan for the galley area that I am excited above. I don't have a dedicated dinette area and I hope my plan for a dinette table isn't too Rube Goldbergish. Sort of a pocket table type set up that I'll post the progress on. The galley area and the companionway steps are all the construction that is left before topside construction begins.
     

    Attached Files:

  11. LP
    Joined: Jul 2005
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    Location: 26 36.9 N, 82 07.3 W

    LP Flying Boatman

    Decking

    Decking the boat!

    image.jpg

    Not really. Just checking deck camber and trimming frame tops. It's a start though. :cool:
     
  12. LP
    Joined: Jul 2005
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    Location: 26 36.9 N, 82 07.3 W

    LP Flying Boatman

    All of the frames are trimmed to height and camber. The sheer is cleaned up and faired and I've installed the aft cockpit frame. It's all shaping up nicely in preparation for decking.

    image.jpg

    I put the galley completion on hold. I'm down to limited stocks of plywood and I find myself spending/wasting too much time trying to get the most efficient usage out of my current supplies. I always seem to get brain lock when I get low on supplies and try to maximize what is on hand. Much of the construction of the galley could be done with lower grades of materials if need be, so I plan to finish out the topside structures and utilize cut-offs as much as possible in the galley area considering possible non-marine materials.

    I'll get my final order of plywood sorted out and work on the deck support structure while I'm waiting for it to come in. I've got the deck carlins made up, but need to put in the forward hatch supports before springing the carlins in. The mizzen mast partners need to be install as well as its step before any more plywood work is done.
     
  13. LP
    Joined: Jul 2005
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    Location: 26 36.9 N, 82 07.3 W

    LP Flying Boatman

    $100 question.

    What should I do with this?

    image.jpg

    I was expecting to have a little more stem head exposed, but I ended up changing the sheer,one of the vessel so there is very little left exposed. I was was looking for a visually transitional look at the stem head, but I'm thinking all I adding now is complicating the build.

    Sooo, trim it flush and deck over it or leave it visual effect? :confused:
     
  14. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Cut it off and put the shape you want on in it's place. This boat is a wee bit big for a painter, so it's just a stem horn. If you want to load it up, use a backing plate below and run some big asss lags up into it from below.
     

  15. LP
    Joined: Jul 2005
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    Location: 26 36.9 N, 82 07.3 W

    LP Flying Boatman

    Thanks, Paul.

    Deck structure is roughed in. I'll start gooing things up in a couple of days. The final plywood order should be arriving in a couple of days also. Plenty of work on the horizon. Splashing next spring could be a reality. :D

    image.jpg
     
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