Bilge Sump - Canoe Body

Discussion in 'Boatbuilding' started by SeaJay, Aug 2, 2010.

  1. SeaJay
    Joined: Jun 2007
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    Location: Sacramento

    SeaJay Senior Member

    Guys, I'm stumped on this one...The hull of the 46' motor sailer I have under construction is really flat at the lowest level of the bilge. I estimate that before water would build up to a depth of 1" at the lowest spot, it would cover an area maybe 10ft long by 3 ft wide. I can sort of corral it by directing it along stringers and through limber holes but unless I can find a pump that will pick up a half in inch of water, I think any random bilge water is just going to slosh around forever. (I'm just talking about nusiance water here.)

    I suppose I could cut through the bottom and form a small sump that would nest inside the top of the keel, but the thought of taking a saws-all to that part of my boat just doesn't appeal to me one bit. Short of this, does anyone have any suggestions?

    Best Regards,

    SeaJay
     
  2. troy2000
    Joined: Nov 2009
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    troy2000 Senior Member

    A good diaphragm pump should be able to pick up anything over 1/4", I would think. I wouldn't want to have it on auto for anything that shallow, though.
     
  3. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    gonzo Senior Member

    That's the problem with canoe bodies without bilges. They get a little water in and splash all over the inside of the boat. A sump in the keel may help some, but when you are rolling or heeling over, the water will still splash around.
     
  4. SeaJay
    Joined: Jun 2007
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    Location: Sacramento

    SeaJay Senior Member

    thanks guys. You're pretty much confirming what I thought. I'm afraid this is just a fact of life that I'm going to have to live with
     
  5. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    Leave it as it is,

    almost all modern mass production sail boats have that sort of (usually non existant) problem. commonly that is a very dry space.

    Regards
    Richard
     
  6. TeddyDiver
    Joined: Dec 2007
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    Location: Finland/Norway

    TeddyDiver Gollywobbler

    If you really have some water you could make a raised sump. It's basicly a what it sounds like, a raised sump with sloping outer sides. X figured "stringers" guiding water toward the sump. Heeling and pitching run water in..
     

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  7. SeaJay
    Joined: Jun 2007
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    Location: Sacramento

    SeaJay Senior Member

    Teddy,

    This is a clever idea! I think I can do something like this. Thanks!
     
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