Big Future:Major decision

Discussion in 'Education' started by sele, Aug 10, 2013.

  1. sele
    Joined: Jul 2011
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    Location: türkiye

    sele High School Student

    I am going to be senior high school student this year ,in Turkey and I wish to study in USA. Although I am going to make an early application ,I haven't really decided my major yet because I have doubts between Naval arcitecture,Aerospace engineering and architecture. Naval Architecture seams to be a hands on experience but I really couldn't find enough info about the major. Can somebody help me depict what a naval architect does,what are the working conditions?
     
  2. El_Guero

    El_Guero Previous Member

    OK,

    You are making a lot of decisions at one time.

    But, your first choice should be, what do you 'want' to do?

    When you lay awake at night before you go to sleep, will you dream of flying a plane? Going to the moon? Designing apartment buildings so they do not fall down during earthquakes? Or sailing the Black Sea?

    The answer to those questions help you understand how your brain is 'wired.' You can always go against your brain's wiring, just like you can sail 'close to the wind.'

    But, these questions answer the question "what do you want to do?" You can always make money in one field and enjoy one of the others. You can be an architecture, fly a private plane, and sail the Black Sea on weekends.

    Wayne
     
  3. sele
    Joined: Jul 2011
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    Location: türkiye

    sele High School Student

    I believe that is a very good approach to the subject and I think the environment I come from has always been source of my fascination for boats.However, even if I appreciate doing mechanical projects,designing a system that will result in a movement I always hear that the the workplace conditions are not very suitable and that is my greatest concern.
     
  4. El_Guero

    El_Guero Previous Member

    Then ask a boat builder if you can work for free for him the rest of this summer?

    Hearing what people say, and seeing it for yourself are two different opinions.

    I worked in the Oil Field. I hear people all the time tell me that diesel fuel stinks. And gasoline stinks.

    I enjoy both smells. I do not want to live in either smell, but I do not think of 'stink' when I hear gasoline or diesel.

    Wayne
     
  5. michael pierzga
    Joined: Dec 2008
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    Location: spain

    michael pierzga Senior Member

    Go engineering. Naval architecture is an engineering discipline..first become an engineer...then take up marine engineering or Naval architecture if this is your personal interest.

    My niece went mechanical engineering with a speciality in 3d printing. Huge demand for graduates.

    Naval architecture is low demand...be careful.

    I dont know which school you would approach as a foreign student.

    For an American, Northeastern University in Boston is very desirable.

    Also investigate Geological Engineering. Very good career.... high demand.
     
  6. DCockey
    Joined: Oct 2009
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    Location: Midcoast Maine

    DCockey Senior Member

    "Naval architecture" is really a branch of engineering. There are engineers working in aerospace engineering who have naval architecture degrees, and there are engineers working in naval architecture who have aerospace degrees. All engineering fields have some jobs which are very "hands on" and some which are not.

    I'm not a naval architect but I have talked to several about their jobs. As in any engineering field there is no single description of the job of a naval architect just like there is no single description of the job of an aerospace engineer, ocean engineer, electrical engineer, mechanical or any other type of engineer. Some naval architects work by themselves or in a small group, some work for large firms or government organizations, and others work in medium size offices. Some, but not many, spend most of their time working on new designs. Some do analysis. Some do testing. Some work with existing vessels. Some specialize in one area while others work on a variety of areas. Some spend a lot of time at the yard, others never get out of the office. Some travel frequently, others almost never travel.

    "Architecture" as in designing building is mostly "design". It is much less technical than engineering and in some ways is closer to art than engineering. The structural design of large building is done by structural engineers, not architects. The university curriculum for architects is completely different than for naval architects and other types of engineering.
     
  7. sele
    Joined: Jul 2011
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    Location: türkiye

    sele High School Student

    Yes architecture and engineering are way too different.But what I want is to design a working machine using both engineering and creative design skills.Architecture seemed to be the more artistic science field but my aim is not to build houses.And I wonder if the creativity&mechanical skills also apply for NA.
     
  8. El_Guero

    El_Guero Previous Member

    No.

    'Creativity' is what you find in art classes or on the job.

    Engineering is the hard, how to make something work in the real world. Most artsy engineering types spend 10 to 20 years getting good in their field and then 'creating.'
     
  9. Titirangi

    Titirangi Previous Member

    1st decide what is your long term objective - global projects, fame, fortune and retired at 40???
    2nd decide what it is you really enjoy doing - passion always replaces effort
    3rd what ever course you decide you can always re-define - change direction later

    The reality is there is much more commercial opportunities and demand for architects and Oil/Gas specialist engineers than NA.

    If creative design is your driving force consider in what industry sector your best long term options of best served.

    In NZ, Australia loop holes in govt regs allow anyone with half a brain and a PC to legally design and build any craft even commercial public ferries without an engineering or NA degree or licence and believe me the are several of the species currently doing just that.
    Downside is university educated and qualified NA are forced to compete with anyone with a just a PC, design software and website while lacking any ability to do their own structural engineering calculations or hydrostatic models
     
  10. DCockey
    Joined: Oct 2009
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    DCockey Senior Member

    Jobs in architecture can be very dependent on economic conditions. I know of several architects in the US who could not find work in the recent downturn. Either the firms they were working laid off most of their employees and no one was hiring, or if self-employed no work was available.
     
  11. sele
    Joined: Jul 2011
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    sele High School Student

    In this case I may go with aerospace because it can deal with every vehicle.However I have a concern about aerospace :they say it is a too hard course. I lie in Turkey and we do not have choices like AP or advanced classes if I had the opportunity I would have taken all the hardest classes.So that is why I am concerned about the major: would it be too hard for me to get used to it.For example according to our program we start calculus in 9th grade ,study integrals at 12th grade but I do not know if it covers for all the advanced courses.
     
  12. DCockey
    Joined: Oct 2009
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    DCockey Senior Member

    First year engineering students at US universities generally take the same math, physics and chemistry courses. It is usually possible to switch between engineering fields at the end of the first year so the exact choice of engineering field is not nearly as critical as deciding if you want to study engineering. The University of Michigan curriculum is typical: http://www.engin.umich.edu/college/academics/undergrad/reqs/core Math for US engineering students starts with "Calculus I" so you should be well prepared if you have studied integrals in 12th grade.

    University of Michigan offers a dual degree program where students obtain degrees in Naval Architecture and Aerospace Engineering or degrees in Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering.

    Virginia Tech has a department of Aerospace & Ocean Engineering. Classes are offered in hydrodynamics, resistance and propulsion of ships, ship design, etc.

    Aerospace may be "harder" for some students, and may require more work at some universities. But it depends on the student and university. My undergraduate studies were in mechanical and aerospace engineering and I also took classes in hydrodynamics and water wave mechanics. Chemical engineering would have been harder for me because chemistry and thermodynamics are harder for me than physics and applied math.
     
  13. sele
    Joined: Jul 2011
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    sele High School Student

    After all, I am not a physics genius and I doubt the level of the classes: is aerospace engineering a major extremely hard to finish?
     
  14. Leo Lazauskas
    Joined: Jan 2002
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    Leo Lazauskas Senior Member

    Yes, if you are not good at physics and maths and/or not interested in working
    hard to improve those skills.
    It's rocket science ;)
     

  15. sele
    Joined: Jul 2011
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    Location: türkiye

    sele High School Student

    I had a 750 on SAT math 2 and a 740 on SAT math 1 do you think those are suitable for aerospace?
     
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