Best type of ship for my situation

Discussion in 'All Things Boats & Boating' started by GoldenOrange, Oct 20, 2013.

  1. GoldenOrange
    Joined: Oct 2013
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    GoldenOrange New Member

    Hello all! I love the ocean, everything about it, its power, beauty, etc. I was born on island, and here pretty soon I want to live on a boat. I am not the average American, I have no trouble living in a tent all year if it is what I want to do. But my end goal is to open a fishing charter business or something similar, and get paid to do what I love.

    So my question, I want a ship that can survive decent storms, that costs under 100k. Basically what is a perfect ship for me, is the coast guard MLB 47, with a living quarters. Able to take on big waves, capsize proof, waterproof. I have no idea of the price of one of these ships, but I am certain it would be over 100k, if they are even available to civilians. I am not stupid enough to think it is hurricane proof, nor would I be willing to find out if such a ship is. But I don't want to have to seek shelter for every single storm that comes along.

    Is there a ship\boat any of you can recommend that meets or closely meets these requirements?
     
  2. peter radclyffe
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    peter radclyffe Senior Member

    a north sea trawler
     
  3. peter radclyffe
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    peter radclyffe Senior Member

    nothing is capsizeproof
     
  4. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Welcome to the forum.

    MLB 47's run about 1.2 million. USD. Truly capable ocean going vessels aren't exactly cheap. You can find "harbor queens" that look the part, but really aren't, though are priced in your ball park.

    If you lack the experience, as I suspect, you'd be best advised to get some, which would include crewing on a head boat, so you get an idea of how very unglamorous the work is. Your time at sea, with a bunch of paying lubbers will teach you much about the trade, how to keep drunken fishermen in the cockpit, mechanical break downs, navigation, how to drive in various conditions, how to stretch a dollar just to pay for your fuel bills, etc.
     
  5. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    Aww jeez... A coast guard lifeboat may be seaworthy but its 1000 hp engine burns so much fuel that after 4 or 5 hours you would run out of fuel and the pirates would get ya' in thier little outboard skiffs then barbecue you

    Search and rescue boats are short range craft and cost a couple million each.

    And whats this non sense about storms ? A competent seaman can look at the weather forcast and avoid them .

    Oh and i hate to tell you this but you wont get an ocean capable motorboat for one hundred thousand.

    Best to look for used commercial inshore fishing boats like a lobsteboat or longliner.
    Set aside two hundred thousand and expect some commisioning and safety work costs
     
  6. WestVanHan
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    WestVanHan Not a Senior Member

  7. GoldenOrange
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    GoldenOrange New Member

    Thanks for the help! You are right, I am not very experienced, I have drove some fishing boats, but that was in open ocean nothing in confined spaces or channels. Hmm it seems this is going to be harder than expected. And from what I hear it isn't going to be worth it unless I am making money somehow. And thanks for clarifying the MLB, I thought that a ship that size would have some decent range.

    I think I may start off with some sort of fishing boat, under 100k, that can't handle storms but will get me some experience before I invest in something a lot bigger. And just get off of it during storms haha.

    I was looking at something like this, maybe. A bit old, though.
    http://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1966/Stewart-Seacraft--2515264/TX/United-States#.UmRVivke1-8

    This looks really interesting but out of my price range.
    http://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1971/Custom-Dive-Vessel-2447566/United-Kingdom#.UmRQhvke1-8
     
  8. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    As previously mentioned, handling storms is more a skipper skill element then a hull design type. Of course some boats are just better suited, but even one of these can get you into trouble. Issues in storms are almost always because of poor choices the skipper has made. It's rare to find the boat let them down, though occasionally a bonehead will take an unsuited vessel into deep water with little regard to their abilities to cope, when the crap hits the fan.

    Again, get some experience and as you do, your ideas of your dream yacht will evolve, very likely to be quite different than what you currently think it should be.

    Lastly, there's no free rides. Building a yacht isn't cheap, nor easy and unless financially unrestrained, you'll not be able to stumble into a world cruising dream yacht, without a significant amount of effort and cash. Simply put, very little about yachting, especially with 50' boats is inexpensive. Just slip fees alone will be several thousand dollars a year. I pay over $7k per year to have a 65' yacht at Daytona beach. If I lived aboard I have another $600 fee, plus $85 or more for utilities per month. This doesn't include haulouts and other annual, yacht ownership fees. Call around and see what it costs to park your 50 foot whatever. Reality will quickly step in.
     
  9. GoldenOrange
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    GoldenOrange New Member

    Any recommendations on how to get experience? I am going after my OUPV, I have only a few days experience so far though. I am in the age old loop; no experience, need experience to get job, need job to get experience. Where can I enter in this field?
     
  10. El_Guero

    El_Guero Previous Member

    Internships.

    Volunteer with an established builder.

    Volunteer with an established non-profit around the industry.

    God down to the marina, hang out at the local coffee shops and volunteer to help people sail their ships.
     
  11. El_Guero

    El_Guero Previous Member

    For that matter, ask PAR if you can work for him. You might have to move some, but he is in the middle of the state, so you won't have to move too far.
     
  12. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Thanks Wayne, just what I need another lubber to teach :). I'm not sure where you are Orange, but I'm just above Orlando. Currently, as you'd imagine, the market is depressed, but as mentioned, volunteering is a great way to get started. Drive along the coast nearest you and check out all the little towns. Each will have two types of marinas, one is for the folks that expect clean showers, good food and the gift shop is priced higher than the local mall. The other type has older boats, no gift shop and it wouldn't be unusual to see lots of rust stains on boats and various equipment around the yard. This is the place you want to hang out and see if you can help. Show up early on a weekday with some donuts and introduce yourself. They'll give you at least 5 minutes, just for a donut. Tell them what you're looking to do and after the laughing stops, you'll get some serious and some less so replies. After a while of this rapport building stuff, someone will take a chance with you and you're off the the races. Another skill builder is going down the the local sailing club and getting on as rail meat. You'll learn boat handling, sail handling and the what not to do as a skipper.
     
  13. GoldenOrange
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    GoldenOrange New Member

    Awesome tips. I am in Colorado right now I moved up here for a job, from Texas (Galveston), and I hate it here. Cold, snow, wind. I am moving down to Florida here within the next month or two, and am just poking around for jobs online. I am hardworking, started going to college for computer networking because I am so good with computers, then decided not too because sitting behind a desk all day for the rest of my life isn't me, so I have been working as a carpenter for the last couple of years. I believe that I can be a good hand, it is just finding the right boss haha. But thanks for that idea, hanging around the places, that is a really good idea. My girlfriend is going to college, she lives in West Miami.
     
  14. El_Guero

    El_Guero Previous Member

    You're welcome.
     

  15. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    You dont need any special experience. A US coast Guard small craft licensee and common sense.

    The whole charter market is full of retired owner operators.

    To operate you need a booking agent. First step is to find this booking agent and research what type of boat , what season and which area of operation is most suitable.

    Its a tough market..street smart, hands on operators thrive . Misguided operators throw their money away.

    The best boat purchase is from a misguided bankrupt operator.
     
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