Best Tender for a Classic

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by BeauVrolyk, Aug 12, 2010.

  1. BeauVrolyk
    Joined: Apr 2009
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    BeauVrolyk Sailor

    I looked around and couldn't find any better place here to put this question, so here goes:

    What do people suggest as a tender for a classic style yacht?

    Whitehall, Catalina Wherry, Banks Dory, etc..... I'm looking for real advice and might build might buy; but I probably won't design it.

    Thoughts?

    Beau
     
  2. TeddyDiver
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    TeddyDiver Gollywobbler

    For a bigger yach a scandinavian Snipa.. inboard engine, can carry a sail too..
     

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  3. FAST FRED
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    FAST FRED Senior Member

    Look at the FEATHER CRAFT site.

    These light early aluminum boats ,The Deluxe Runabout , and some others are very stylish , great tumblehome , and very inexpensive.

    The old shiney "streamliner" trains are very captivating , so there is no reason that a classic launch needs to be wood.

    FF
     
  4. BeauVrolyk
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    BeauVrolyk Sailor

    Thanks

    Thanks for the leads so far. My friend and I need to lift whatever we get aboard our low-freeboard sloop so I'm afraid a powered tender won't do. Also, I really hate gasoline aboard a boat; so, I'm trying for oars and sails.

    BV
     
  5. TeddyDiver
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    TeddyDiver Gollywobbler

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  6. alan white
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    alan white Senior Member

    A 14 ft or thereabouts dory, with an outboard well, oars, and sprit or lugsaill. Fit it with a 2 hp four stroke. Good seaboat as well, in case ya gotta sail it home.
     
  7. duluthboats
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    duluthboats Senior Dreamer

    If you want classic, you can restore or commission something like this one, which is a tender to a vintage Monk.
    [​IMG]
     
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  8. Tad
    Joined: Mar 2002
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    Tad Boat Designer

    If you are lifting it aboard you want a lightweight plywood or cedar planked boat with minimal framing.......Kits for lapstrake ply tenders are available by mailorder from WoodenBoat and Chesapeake Light Craft....

    Or you could choose to support traditional wooden boat building by commissioning or buying from one of the boatbuilding schools......The Arques school is local.......

    http://www.arqueschl.org/

    Also the NW School up in Washington......

    http://www.nwboatschool.org/
     
  9. luckystrike
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    luckystrike Power Kraut

  10. jimbo2010
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    jimbo2010 Junior Member

    I just received the plans for this 10'

    [​IMG]

    a 1932 design only 70 lbs
     
  11. BeauVrolyk
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    BeauVrolyk Sailor

    Beautiful!!

    This 1932 beauty is lovely. What's it called? What's its LOA? I was thinking that as a tender it would be perfect. Although I might paint the lower 1/2 of the outside of the hull to match the sloop. That does, however, seem a crime to commit.

    BV
     
  12. BeauVrolyk
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    BeauVrolyk Sailor

    That's beautiful. Where was it found? Prints/plans???

    BV
     
  13. jimbo2010
    Joined: Sep 2010
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    jimbo2010 Junior Member

    Paint may be reason to be keel hauled:p

    It is a Lawton design, I have the plans if you want them


    Length (LOA) 10.06"
    Length (LWL) 9,82"
    Beam (BOA) 45"
    Beam (BWL) 43"
    Weight 70 lbs.
    Displacement (Capacity) 575
    Draft (at Capacity) 4.83
    Center Depth 19.81"
    Depth at Bow 23.16"
     
  14. troy2000
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    troy2000 Senior Member

    Edwin Monk's How to Build Wooden Boats: With 16 Small-Boat Designs, published in 1946, has plans for a beautiful 9' x 4' pram which will carry up to four people. He named it 'Stubby,' which is an injustice; it's quite a graceful little thing.

    I redrew it two feet longer for my nephew a few years ago, and there were no particular problems in the build. As a matter of fact, the constant-angle vee-bottom made it easy to substitute plywood for the bottom.

    edit: Monk's book is available through google books, and the plans themselves can be seen in this preview (along with a photo of the prototype):

    http://books.google.com/books?id=n0...&resnum=1&ved=0CAYQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q&f=false
     

  15. peter radclyffe
    Joined: Mar 2009
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    peter radclyffe Senior Member

    i can build you one of these we built for lulworth
    [​IMG]
     
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