Best Marine Design Software for Hull Modeling? (2008-09)

Discussion in 'Software' started by Admin, Apr 8, 2008.

?

Which program(s) do you use as your primary hull design software?

  1. Autoship (Autoship Systems Corporation)

    13 vote(s)
    6.2%
  2. Catia

    9 vote(s)
    4.3%
  3. DefCar (DefCar Engineering)

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  4. Delftship

    28 vote(s)
    13.4%
  5. Fastship (Proteus Engineering)

    2 vote(s)
    1.0%
  6. HullCAO (HullCAO)

    1 vote(s)
    0.5%
  7. Hull Form (Blue Peter Marine Systems)

    2 vote(s)
    1.0%
  8. Maxsurf (Formation Design Systems)

    59 vote(s)
    28.2%
  9. MultiSurf (Aerohydro)

    10 vote(s)
    4.8%
  10. Naval Designer

    2 vote(s)
    1.0%
  11. Prolines (Vacanti Yacht Design)

    4 vote(s)
    1.9%
  12. ProSurf (New Wave Systems)

    3 vote(s)
    1.4%
  13. Rhino (Robert McNeel & Assoc.)

    53 vote(s)
    25.4%
  14. SeaSolution

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  15. TouchCAD

    5 vote(s)
    2.4%
  16. Other (please post below)

    18 vote(s)
    8.6%
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  1. ParamarineV6
    Joined: Mar 2009
    Posts: 7
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: UK

    ParamarineV6 Junior Member

    Hi Matt

    Are you interested in hearing more about Paramarine V6? if so I'm more than happy to send you a demo copy and a presentation.

    Drop me a line to hf@grc-ltd.co.uk

    Hamish Fowler
    MD
     
  2. valber
    Joined: Feb 2006
    Posts: 56
    Likes: 5, Points: 8, Legacy Rep: 97
    Location: Ukraine

    valber Naval Architect

    I have sent inquiry to these guys... In the answer I had a silence... Thus I think, what there will be such support in the future if I buy it?
     
  3. ParamarineV6
    Joined: Mar 2009
    Posts: 7
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: UK

    ParamarineV6 Junior Member

    Paramarine Support

    Valber

    If we've not responed to you many apologies - this is very untypical of us. If you send me your details again I'll get it actioned. Can you reply to my email address please - hf@grc-ltd.co.uk and I'll get it sorted - please bear in mind I'm in the US this week but I WILL get you what you need.

    Drop me a note with

    a) the bit of paramarine you want to know about - Hull Gen?, stability? Powering? Structures? Endurance? Design for Production? Early Stage Design? Maneouvring? Seakeeping?
    B)Ships?
    c)Submarines?

    You let me know what you need and I'll make sure you get a great reply but please get in touch directly with your full contact details and location.

    Many thanks and apologies for the lack of response - sincerely.

    Hamish Fowler
    MD QinetiQ GRC Ltd
     
  4. valber
    Joined: Feb 2006
    Posts: 56
    Likes: 5, Points: 8, Legacy Rep: 97
    Location: Ukraine

    valber Naval Architect

    Hamish Fowler

    OK, I will write to you...
    Good luck
     
  5. JAK
    Joined: May 2009
    Posts: 4
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: NYC,USA

    JAK New Member

    Newbie needs help

    Hi,

    I am in need of some help.
    I am using Rhino as an architect for some years now, so I've a certain knowledge of it.
    I am trying to draw a 11' Yacht Tender by Paul Gartside in 3D, which I'd like to then build with the help of a 3-Axis CNC router.
    The boat is planked with 3 strakes of plywood, which of course can not have a compound curvature...
    I can easily create a surface for the garboard, the way I usually would do, with for example "sweep 2 rails", but that's of course compound curvature...
    I worked with the Rhino Marine Tutorial, but the way it describes how to loft the garboard for their skiff, didn't really help at all.
    (Quote: If you have never done this, it probably won't work...)
    I was able to loft a surface along a chine and the centerline (extended into negative space as per tutorial) but A) I am not able to precisely hit the stem rabbet and B) it's a compound curved surface again...

    Could anybody explain to me how you'd create a garboard surface intended to be plywood / single curvature???

    I really don't get it, and it drives me nuts!

    Thanks!
     
  6. Norm01
    Joined: Feb 2009
    Posts: 3
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: australia

    Norm01 New Member

    Basic drafting

    I just want to do some basic drawings for fun, on paper, what is the best (read cheapest) way to get some curves without buying whole sets.

    I will then go on to a computer, am i better off going to autocad or equivalent(which I know) or to a program such as DEFtship?

    Should i just go straight awaay to a hull design program ? . I just want to muck around designing small boats, i dont want to be a designer or enter the industry.Thanks in advance
     
  7. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    Try this, its a very powerful tool and extremely easy to manage! get:
    http://www.carlsondesign.com/#Fun_Shareware
    Regards
    Richard
     
  8. Guest625101138

    Guest625101138 Previous Member

    Norm
    Delftship or its parent, Freeship, is used by many here and there are many questions already answered on its use.

    It takes about a 20 to 40 hours of frustration to get used to using it but it is very rewarding once you come to grips with the notion of surface modelling, as opposed to solid modelling or 2D drafting, and a few of the menu commands in Delftship.

    The ability to render a hull in a few minutes and move it around in 3D to look at it is fantastic compared with playing with paper. You may find it easy to make some basic sketches on paper to get the proportions but you get something close to real life in Delftship.

    There are quite a few Freeship files already on the forum so you can see how others have done it.

    The price of the standard version of Delftship cannot be bettered unless you are in a position to be paid to evaluate software. There is no obligation on its use. (I felt obligated because I use it so much that I paid for the Pro version - it has a little more functionality particularly with the type of files it can export) I have had a hull blank and prop milled from 3D files I produced in Delftship and was very pleased with the outcome. Also a number of hand formed or hand cut hulls that have worked extremely well.

    Once you have the hull drawn up in Delftship you have all the information to loft the hull either by hand or machine.

    Rick W
     
  9. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    Ahh yes you did...........
    adding another tool to your half educated way of getting results?
    I know you do┬┤nt like it:
    Rick you are unprofessional!
    Regards
    Richard
     
  10. wardd
    Joined: Apr 2009
    Posts: 897
    Likes: 37, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 442
    Location: usa

    wardd Senior Member

    is there a program or way to shape a hull then add points to represent the weight of components to see how it affects the actual waterline
     
  11. Guest625101138

    Guest625101138 Previous Member

    You can do it in Delftship or FreeShip but it can be a little tedious if there are a lot of components to consider.

    You create a new Layer for each item such as the hull, seats, bunks, engine, shaft, person, water tank, fuel tank, battery etc. These are positioned in the hull where required. All components with significant mass need to be included. The layer properties are set either based on actual material density for items like hull panels or component weight by adjusting the density to achieve the known weight.

    The end result of this is that you will get the total boat weight and its longitudinal position (LCG). You then have to adjust the trim and draft iteratively until the buoyancy ballances the weight and the longitudinal CoB is the same as the LCG. This typically takes a few minutes. Alternatively you can reposition items to shift the LCG to get the desired trim.

    Rick W
     
  12. Ad Hoc
    Joined: Oct 2008
    Posts: 6,926
    Likes: 861, Points: 113, Legacy Rep: 2488
    Location: Japan

    Ad Hoc Naval Architect

    "...You then have to adjust the trim and draft iteratively until the buoyancy ballances the weight and the longitudinal CoB is the same as the LCG.."

    If you understand the basic principals, there is no iteration.
    It is a simple couple and hence a moment calculation in terms of what mass over what distance to balance. From your MCT you can also see, before hand, how much trim is expected.

    The design process is iterative, the calculations are simple 'one liners'.
     
  13. wardd
    Joined: Apr 2009
    Posts: 897
    Likes: 37, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 442
    Location: usa

    wardd Senior Member

    thanks, i'm thinking in the 30 foot range, something trailerable

    i have delftship, i'll look into it more

    i was thinking major components like engine , generator and tanks
     
  14. Guest625101138

    Guest625101138 Previous Member

    If you have a hull drawn up in Delftship then you can get some idea how to do it by setting the layer properties for the intended material of construction. This will give the hull weight.

    Once you have some weight to look at, you run the hydrostatics report and the table at the bottom of the page will give you the weight and its location in terms of VCG, LCG and TCG. As you add layers you will get a new line in this table for each layer. Delftship averages the moments of each item to determine the overall position of the CofG.

    The first table in the report titled "Volume properties" will give you the LCB. For the hull to sit on the waterline drawn you will need to have LCG the same as LCB.

    Modelling things like an engine and tank can be done by simply adding a box for each of the appropriate size and in the intended location. Make sure you tick the "Create new layer" box when you add. You can name the layer "Engine" so it is easy to work out what is what as you add components. Select a density and thickness of box so that the calculated weight matches your proposed engine weight. You need to take care to ensure the "Symmetric" box is unticked for an item that is not mirrored in the hull. If not it will add twice the weight.

    Using separate layers for individual items will allow you to move them relative to the others as you choose.

    Rick W
     

  15. valber
    Joined: Feb 2006
    Posts: 56
    Likes: 5, Points: 8, Legacy Rep: 97
    Location: Ukraine

    valber Naval Architect

    MultiSurf can do it!
     
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