best marine crimps

Discussion in 'OnBoard Electronics & Controls' started by Karl_T, Dec 19, 2010.

  1. Landlubber
    Joined: Jun 2007
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    Landlubber Senior Member

    "but the conditions under a washing machine are very demanding of good quality electrical connectors."....maybe, but the current is bugger all........and wire nuts are not allowed anyhow under ABYC rules......
     
  2. CDK
    Joined: Aug 2007
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    CDK retired engineer

    The popular red, yellow and blue sleeved Chinese wire connectors are wrongly labeled as crimp terminals. They are flattened, not crimped and are the main cause of vehicle electrical problems. The real ones come from AMP or Molex and are tinned or gold plated copper alloy, insulation only added after crimping.

    To check if you're using the right combination of wire, terminal and tool, clamp the terminal in a vise and pull the wire. If you can pull it out or if it snaps at the crimp area, the quality is dubious.

    The most comprehensive source for industrial connectors is here: www.kabelschuhe-shop.de .
     
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  3. Carteret
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    Carteret Senior Member

    I totally agree. This Captain that I worked for was quite an unique individual. He had worked his career for Gruman as an Avionics tech rep on the EA68, probably the most sophisticated aircraft electronically in the US arsenal at the time. The epoxy used was a mixture used in electronics/avionics. If we ever get a chance to share a beer I could swap some great stories about this man.
     
  4. bulk-head
    Joined: Dec 2007
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    Location: Antigua

    bulk-head Junior Member

    Soldering is not recommended. High quality soldering results are not repeatable in the boatbuilding environment, the flux residue promotes corrosion, the insulation may become overheated and most important the solder creeps up the wire and " hardens " a flexible multi strand copper wire. Best to stick with top quality crimps and tools then concentrate on your own craftsmanship when performing industry standard electrical installations.
     
  5. War Whoop
    Joined: Jun 2003
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    Location: Sunny Ft Lauderdale Fla

    War Whoop Senior Member

    You better be able to repeat exactly or get fired.


    [​IMG]




    [​IMG]



    [​IMG]
     
  6. bulk-head
    Joined: Dec 2007
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    Location: Antigua

    bulk-head Junior Member

    Yah War Whoop...very high attention to detail in that work. Looks good.
    Im sure it will give decades of service to its owner.. Difficult to imagine an amateur performing this.

    Wire crimps are much easier to duplicate. Repeatability is critical . Crimps are all I see on commercially wired yachts these days . The yacht presently being serviced, pictured, is 15 years old , virtually 100 percent crimped, and her only electrical wiring issues are a few wire insulation breakdowns on the outside, stretched surface, of tight bends. Be careful with your wire bend radius.
     

    Attached Files:

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  7. CDK
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    CDK retired engineer

    Very nice wiring War Whoop.
    The weak spots are the relays near the hydraulic pumps. Some time in the future, they will spoil the fun.
     
  8. powerabout
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    powerabout Senior Member

    and the aluminium fuel fittings which are not USCG approved.
    They look good though.
     
  9. War Whoop
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    War Whoop Senior Member

    Why would you say something that stupid, To hear yourself talk? most fuel tanks come with aluminum stops anyway what the hell are you going to use bronze or brass?? and the Coastguard was in the shop on a regular basis and never found a problem in 350 boats.
     
  10. SamSam
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    SamSam Senior Member

    This can be messy, but it works.

    [​IMG]
     
  11. powerabout
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    powerabout Senior Member

    its all here
    http://www.uscgboating.org/assets/pdf/downloads/FUELSYSTEM.pdf
    FEDERAL LAW:
    183.538 Metallic fuel line materials.
    Each metallic fuel line connecting the fuel tank with the fuel inlet connection
    on the engine must:
    (a) be made of seamless annealed copper, nickel copper, or copper nickel;
    and

    Ever wondered why when you buy a fuel pump or filter from Merc or OMC or Yam etc they always come with bronze/brass/plated steel fittings and never aluminium.
    Ever see an Aluminium pipe or fitting on a marine engine as fitted by the OEM
     
  12. Bglad
    Joined: May 2010
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    Bglad Senior Member

    Neither USCG or ABYC refers to fittings in their standards. You are correct about tubing although none was visible in the photo.

    A number of fuel system components are made of aluminum or aluminum alloys such as quicksilver fuel filter/water separators, Racor filters and others. Also mentioned of course diesel/petrol tanks.
     
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  13. powerabout
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    powerabout Senior Member

    what about the red sweeps or when does a fitting become a pipe?
     
  14. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    Gee ? I thought that anodized aluminium was all Hydraulics !!! Nice looking.

    Ive never seen anodized used on a fuel system. What is the advantage ? cost, weight ?
     
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  15. Bglad
    Joined: May 2010
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    Location: Jacksonville, Florida

    Bglad Senior Member

    I see your point. Maybe the answer is that if it is an aluminum fitting pipe or otherwise it is ok. If it is annealed aluminum fuel line trying to pass as one of the others it is no go.
     
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