Best Inside Passage Trawler??

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by DanRay, Sep 10, 2010.

  1. Brian@BNE
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    Brian@BNE Senior Member

    No, we have nice winters here! You need a sweater just a few weeks a year, and some folks have no form of heating in their home whatsoever. Summers on the other hand....

    But keep posting folks, I really want to visit your wonderland, maybe even in winter and am hungry for info. And I keep on thinking Tad's PL56 won't be too much boat to handle or build, but I am coming around to just a single engine (and CPP) thanks to what I'm learning on BD
     
  2. BATAAN
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    BATAAN Senior Member

    I repaired these things for years and as far as older Trawler yachts are concerned, the Grand Banks line is very well built and thought out. F'rinstance... the windows are made to be repaired and the owner's manual goes through the whole procedure, telling where the hidden screws are etc.
    I delivered an older GB 42 (wood) from SF Bay to Vancouver BC complete with an anus-clenching breaking sea on the Chetco River bar, and she never leaked or gave any problem with the hull. The worn out engines on the other hand were a trial.
    It's nice to get somewhere quickly, but that always seems to cost more. I want a scaled-down Schnellboot so I can do 40 knots in bad weather.
     
  3. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    The old GB woodies had a capable hull, the newer FRP boats far less so, the actual ones are cr@p in terms of seaworthiness.
     
  4. Commuter Boats
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    Commuter Boats Commuter Boats

    With all due respect for Mr. Monk and William Garden ( truly masters with excellent sense for the cruising areas described here) you could be a little less modest, I absolutely enjoy your work and your thoughts yet you reserved both.

    I enjoy boating year-round and I'm not limited to short excursions on only the nice days. That's not the only difference in the way you and I boat and a Bayliner would be absolutely unacceptable for what I do but I agree that they are well-suited for much of the boating public.

    I've only been deep into a few (8-10) grand Banks but well-built is not a thought that comes to mind. Their popularity speaks to being well thought out and they've held their value well but those that have been damaged don't hold up well in my opinion.

    I have attached two photographs of a repair in which I uncovered two layers of dirt within the hull laminate, it would appear that the hull was laid up outdoors and that work was stopped for a storm or some other reason and the laminate was contaminated with a heavy coating of dust. After the surface was dried ( not cleaned) construction continued with a pigmented laminating resin ( to conceal?) and again before the grid was completed, work was again stopped and another layer of dirt became concealed within the laminate. This type of workmanship is unacceptable and no manufacturer can be thought of as quality if that sort of thing is accepted.

    Returning to the thoughts of the appropriate type of hull for the OP, I agree his needs have not been well defined and as all boats are a compromise, I would think that a hull that could operate in the semi-displacement range should be attractive for what I perceive his needs are. Monk, Gardner, and Tad all have experience with this type of cruising, excellent thoughts, and numerous designs that do well in the midteens.
     

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  5. BATAAN
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    BATAAN Senior Member

    My only extensive experience with GB is early wooden ones, other than changing out the occasional valve or cutless bearing as a yard schlep in whatever was in the yard that day.
    The original wooden American Marine GBs were well built of good materials. I cannot say anything about any of the later products, especially after the company was sold. Even the through-hulls were well thought out and accessible for maintenance.
    Why does quality always go downhill?
     
  6. Commuter Boats
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    Commuter Boats Commuter Boats

    It's usually about profit margin but I've been repair business for a long time and I'm constantly approached by boat owners that sought out the cheapest boat they could find and then choose to complain about the quality.... if the first and last word in securing a sale is about price and the manufacture wants to build boats...........
     
  7. BATAAN
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    BATAAN Senior Member

    Here's something that goes very fast in bad conditions. WW2 Schnellboot (E-Boat) about 115 feet long and 3-screw 4000 hp that would do 45 k in flat conditions but keep 25-30 in rough North Sea winter times. A lower powered 50 or 60 footer on the same idea would be very good for the stated use. This is not a planing or semi-planing type but displacement speed well developed.
     

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  8. BATAAN
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    BATAAN Senior Member

  9. BATAAN
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    BATAAN Senior Member

  10. Commuter Boats
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    In his book " The Nature of Boats", Dave Gerr mentions these designs and illustrates a simplified lines drawing. I need to research those more, thank you for those lines.
    Gerald
     
  11. BATAAN
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    BATAAN Senior Member

    Also note the the Lurssen effect detail buried in the second link, which canted the side rudders out at 30 degrees at high speed, making an air bubble that reduces the wake, levels the boat, adds speed and makes it harder to see. Why has all this good stuff been forgotten in modern motor yacht design?
     
  12. Commuter Boats
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    Commuter Boats Commuter Boats

    Thank you, that's beautiful but too radical for most..... the mooring cost is too high:mad:
    I've built several 4 to 1s ( length to beam) , one 5 to 1, and one 7 to 1. It's not an easy sell... I bet Tad would agree, the public likes barges. :confused:
     
  13. BATAAN
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    BATAAN Senior Member

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yosme-SzeGY
    Here's a WW2 propaganda film on the boats working with Destroyers. At the end is some very nice footage of how well the Schnellboote do at high speed. I think a 60 footer based on the type could do very well at the same displacement as a 40 foot trawler yacht. Very well meaning better efficiency and performance for the same displacement and therefore comparable cost.
     
  14. Commuter Boats
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    Thank you, this discussion deserves its own thread, this is not the type of craft the OP will be considering.
     

  15. BATAAN
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    BATAAN Senior Member

    You're right. Trawler yachts are what they are, and perfectly good boats if you're not in a hurry and want to save on fuel. A 60 foot S-Boote derivative would be a cool alternative.
     
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