Best fabrication method for one off kayak catch bin

Discussion in 'Fiberglass and Composite Boat Building' started by IronPrice, Dec 18, 2017.

  1. ondarvr
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    ondarvr Senior Member

    I take it the green one is your current kayak and you want to slide it in where the rear round hatch is.

    Go to one of the big box stores and look in the plumbing section, drain field pipe to be exact, it comes in various diameters so you may get lucky and find one that works for you. There is some very light double wall no hole pipe that might be the right size, normal PVC pipe fitting will fit on it, but you can't use PVC glue on it. Now you have a nice cylinder and PVC cap on the bottom, you can wrap some plastic insulation (bubble wrap stuff) around it, as many layers as desired. You can use a screw on, or slip on PVC cap for the top. This is cheap and light, plus takes an hour or so on a free afternoon.

    The other option is to look at small plastic waste baskets, or similar food storage containers, they come in thousands of different sizes, then wrap with insulation. Some of these come with a lid, or you'll need to make one.
     
  2. rwatson
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    rwatson Senior Member

    " I don't want to cut holes in the kayak deck.
    I want to make a removable bin to fit in the rear well - like this black and yellow catch bin on my previous kayak (it all got stolen"

    Excellent, then the job is even easier.

    Because its nice and shiny, you can use you existing kayak as a mold for the base for a Fibreglass fish bin.

    The idea is to wax up the existing rear "hollow', and put a layer of fibreglass all over it to form the base.

    Then you have a firm "fish bin base" to build from, that fits like a glove onto the kayak.

    The hardest thing for you will be to have enough guts to smear sticky stuff all over you canoe, and have confidence that it will all come off.
    Here is what I suggest.
    1) Use Polyester Resin for the base. It will be less inclined to stick to the shiny plastic. Even if you need to use Epoxy for other parts of the bin, it wont matter.
    2) Get some proper resin wax from your local glass shop, or you can use Beeswax - thoroughly coat all or some of the deck that will be supporting the bin, and of course up the sides.
    3) If you are at all squeamish, there would be nothing wrong with just waxing a small say 1ft x 1 ft section as a test, just to get your confidence. You can even replace the small test section back in place and use it as part of the final bottom piece.
    4) I would layup the base of at least 10 oz biaxial sheet of glass, cut to fit the base and sides, and also a layer of chopped matt, over the deck and short sides. The thicker weave will conform to the deck shape easier than light weight cloth.
    5) Eventually, you can peel the whole bottom piece, perfectly moulded, off the deck area, and you will have a firm base to go on with.
    6) Get some expanding foam, and lay a approx 2" layer over the chopped matt on the base. This will be your bottom insulation.
    7) Using polyester or epoxy resin, make the inner liner by laying up over a cheap plastic tub from the op-shop,
    8) Glue the inner liner to the foam covered base.
    9) mix some more expanding foam and coat the "liner" around the outside. When cured, sand it to a nice shape, and glass over the sanded foam, joining to the base.
    10) make a tight fitting lid as described earlier.

    You should get a pretty schmick result.
     
  3. IronPrice
    Joined: Jul 2017
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    IronPrice Senior Member

    Yes the green one is my new kayak

    I want to make a kayak the same shape as the rear well - i.e. the concave section of the rear deck, that you can see. It would sit under those black cords you can see. Here are pictures of the one for my previous kayak. For an indication of size the fish are about 45cm long. That day I kept 8 fish (1 is still in the bin).

    That rear hatch is quite small (about 14cm) and too far back to reach while on the water. It's only there to allow an optional rudder to be fitted.

    P1000163.JPG

    P1000164.JPG
     
    Last edited: Dec 19, 2017
  4. ondarvr
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    ondarvr Senior Member

    Dang, I was way off.
     
  5. IronPrice
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    IronPrice Senior Member

    Not sure I have the Cahones for that ...
     
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  6. rwatson
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    rwatson Senior Member

    Yes, for the novice, it could be a big ask, but very satisfying when achieved. As I said, you can try it on a small innocuous section, or even try it out on an old plastic bucket lid or similar, until you felt confident. Its much easier than you think.

    However, I can suggest a couple of alternatives for getting the base established, that is a bit more work.

    The aim is to create as snug a fit as possible, to prevent having too much water sloshing around under the bin of course.

    One is to use more safe mold making materials like plaster, or even sawdust and plaster, to make a copy of the contours.

    Or, you could use any relatively dense foam, and cut it into smaller, odd shaped pieces to allow for tight corners and odd deck indents, and could hotglue all these smaller bits together into a say 1-2 inch thick base, that fits pretty snugly. Then , take the "blob" off, use a filler to smooth out and cover any gaps between the blocks on the bottom , and then glass the bottom, sanding into shape where it doesn't fit exactly. Its a variation of strip planking I guess.

    That will get you a fairly close fit, certainly better than buying a square plastic box, and still use every available square inch of deck space available.
     
  7. DGreenwood
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    DGreenwood Senior Member

    Sorry... I assumed it was roto molded.
    Regardless the kayak would make the best mold. No need to fear using it. Just take the time to tape and drape and use a good mold release agent. Build a dam on the deck around the edge of the well and make an upturn to connect to top part to. If you are really nervous about using your kayak as a mold you can spray the whole aft area with PVA.
    I also like rwatsons idea of layer building a foam form and glassing it off-boat. Done well, the foam could act as the insulation when built. That is actually most appealing to me because I am dying to try the use of the (new to me) foam backer board that is intended for masonry backer board. Sold here in box stores. It is covered with a scrim that looks like it would absorb resin. It comes in 1/4" and 1/2" ---Go-board or Kerdi-board. Any one tried it?
     
  8. JosephT
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    JosephT Senior Member

    I like rwatson's approach, but since you're not interested in waxing & making your own catch bin from fiberglass just buy one. Here's a good portable one. Just put some ice in it and toss your fish in there. Boom you're done. I believe Seattle Sports they make different sizes too.

    https://www.amazon.com/Seattle-Sports-Kayak-Catch-Cooler/dp/B001HYPGM0
     
  9. ondarvr
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    ondarvr Senior Member

    It works, but there has to be a pre-made plastic b

    You can also set a Tupperware type container inside these to prevent damaging the soft surfaces, and help keep it clean.
     
  10. IronPrice
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    IronPrice Senior Member

    Again .... fabric fish bags are rubbish. They leak and stink.

    I like Bluebell's suggested method of making cardboard templates. The bin doesn't have to be a perfect fit for the well, because the well has a scupper so it can drain. I'll make a start in the new year.
     
  11. fallguy
    Joined: Dec 2016
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    fallguy Senior Member

    Just tape a thick piece of 6 mil plastic over the boat down into the well and form some 1708 mat backed fabric down into the well. It will have a few wrinkly spots where the plastic gathered, but who cares; it'll be a close fit. After it is dry; you can finish the rest of it to some sharpie lines for the perfect fit. That is what I would do now that I understand better what you want (with the picture added). You don't need much insulator in the bottom of the cooler; just insulate the sides and the top; the air gap under the well will be enough on the bottom.
     
  12. ondarvr
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    ondarvr Senior Member

    Just using clear packing tape works well too, and is sometimes easier to keep flat without wrinkles.
     
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  13. JosephT
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    JosephT Senior Member

  14. fallguy
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    fallguy Senior Member

    Yes, that can work. I prefer the gorilla shipping tape. It is a little wider. Just be cautious about the serrated tape dispenser edges on finished boats; they are nasty sharp and rough and will cut your boat. I have the same issue on my vac table.

    I thought about this method and had a smidgeon of concern about the tape sticking, but it would be unlikely and easily removable.
     

  15. IronPrice
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    IronPrice Senior Member

    Both the plastic sheet and tape methods sound workable. I'm not sure how well the kayak surface will stand up to tape being pulled off? The outer surface is acrylic so perhaps it will tear? It certainly scratches easily.

    I can test an inconspicuous area and see. I guess I could wax the well and then tape it?
     
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