Best Epoxy for *Hand* Layup??

Discussion in 'Materials' started by CatBuilder, Nov 25, 2010.

  1. CatBuilder

    CatBuilder Previous Member

    Yep... despite all my beginner questions, I have layed up a total of 4 48' (15 meter) panels (or half hulls) for my catamaran already in wood/epoxy. That wood split upon handling, so I am moved to making new hulls in foam.

    It was a HUGE layup though. I created half a 48' hull in the time it takes one run of epoxy to set up. :eek:

    I had to have 3 other guys and we worked like mad bedding down 18 8' x 8' (2.5m x 2.5m) scarfed panels of plywood in one epoxy run. We also had to get a diffuser layer on and vacuum bag it before it set up.

    We had to work from 4AM to 8AM because the temperature went up to over 90F (32C) by 9AM! It was down to 80 (26.6C) while we did our laminates, so we still had to move very quickly.

    So yes... I have felt the pressure and know to drink a lot of water, empty out and focus for the few hours.

    I will definitely take your advice and do a trial. I hoped to hire my help for fairing (sanding) rather than layup, but I guess we'll see how it all goes.

    Thanks for the posts, all. I'm excited to do this. Just need to get some cost of materials down so I can afford the extra help here and there.
     
  2. sabahcat
    Joined: Dec 2008
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    sabahcat Senior Member

    Light
    600gsm D/B in and out with more where required for impact, abrasion and load .

    I think other designers building light similar sized cats using duflex, have 800gsm Biax on thinner core
    I figured thicker core + counting the timber grain as equivalent of 200+ gsm of unidirectional put me in the ballpark of "sufficient"
    Also the fact that it will be doing a lesser speed allows for a seemingly light layup as well
     
  3. michael pierzga
    Joined: Dec 2008
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    Not sure if anyone mentioned it but the local laminating, fairing gang uses waterless hand cleaner, the orange stuff you buy in 4 litre jugs at auto parts stores. They tell me its faster and more convenient that vinegar.
     
  4. rxcomposite
    Joined: Jan 2005
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    Location: Philippines

    rxcomposite Senior Member

    Do not invite ladies

    That 32C is working in the shade over here during summer. Goes up to 50-52C outside.

    When you finish your foam cored triaxial boat, do not invite ladies (or men:):p) wearing high heeled shoes. It will splinter your unis and puncture your foam.
     
  5. CatBuilder

    CatBuilder Previous Member

    Another reason for balsa decks?
     
  6. Steve W
    Joined: Jul 2004
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    Steve W Senior Member

    Anyone who came aboard any boat of mine in high heels would soon find out what its like to swim in high heel shoes.
     
  7. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    I've actually had this occur on many occasions while chartering my 63' all teak (from keel to roof top) ketch in the USVI's. They never boarded, most thought I was rude, which I likely was, but I had the best looking yacht there, so they'd be back appropriately dressed, at the other half's insistence.
     
  8. rxcomposite
    Joined: Jan 2005
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    rxcomposite Senior Member

    LOL.:p:D
     
  9. Boston

    Boston Previous Member

    hey Par
    met some friends of yours in the pub the other night
    she said something about working at a marina and I mentioned your company name
    said she had seen some of your work

    cheers
    B
     
  10. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Yea, but I was drunk and woke up in a pink bedroom with frilly stuff on the headboard. I was about to chew my arm off when she woke up and realized I wasn't her husband's brother, who she was using as revenge for cheating on her with her own sister . . . she did have most of her teeth though, which is a rarity for me.
     
  11. Submarine Tom

    Submarine Tom Previous Member

    Was she wearing high heels?

    -Tom
     
  12. Landlubber
    Joined: Jun 2007
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    Landlubber Senior Member

    she had seen your work...PAR, so was it shiny, unbleamished, smoooooth......or not quite up to par?
     
  13. Boston

    Boston Previous Member

    she was with some guy ( probably not her husbands brother ) and mentioned working in a marina selling yachts in FT something ( I was plastered ) so I mentioned Roceli yacht restorations and she brightened right up. Seemed she has been on or sole a few of your boats or something
     
  14. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Yea, it was probably shinny, but eventually it dries off . . .
     

  15. CatBuilder

    CatBuilder Previous Member

    Back to the topics a moment... I am about to buy a lot of AmPreg 22. I'm concerned that it will not wet out the 34oz (1150g) triaxial fabric easily as it's not known to be a low viscosity laminating epoxy. Their old Ampreg 20 apparently used to be lower viscosity.

    Any other thoughts as to best epoxy for wetting out very heavy triaxial and sticking it to corecell?

    I'd also like the epoxy to be less affected by temperature (after it's set up) and have an easy (lower temp) post cure.

    I was looking at System Three Silver Tip laminating epoxy and their Phase Two.

    What's best for such a heavy triaxial?
     
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