Best Design For Liveaboard

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by DavidWaters, Jan 18, 2012.

  1. DavidWaters
    Joined: Jan 2012
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    Location: Vancouver

    DavidWaters Junior Member

    Hello from a runaway sailor,and am grateful to all for all the info I have learned from lurking here.

    We want to liveaboard a power boat,maybe in the 35 to 40' range but could go higher based on price

    SOR:

    -me and wife
    -occasional guests
    -not used much away from dock
    -liveability and good use of space

    Used to be sailors,but am tired of motoring most of the time and being cramped up.
    We looked on liveaboard forums,but they are 98% geared towards sailors,who generally take a dim view of "stinkpots".

    Thanks...
     
  2. WestVanHan
    Joined: Aug 2009
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    Location: Vancouver

    WestVanHan Not a Senior Member

    Welcome to the board.
    I will assume you are aware of the liveaboard/mooring situation in the area.

    Have you considered a float home? If ur not going out much,buy a $12k/25' weekender boat with galley and head,and keep it on it's trailer.

    -retired fishing boats-built for fishing,some can be converted,some are impossible. Poor layouts...sleeping areas usually are a few bunks jammed down into the bow,down a step ladder,with no natural light.
    Impossible to move interior structure to accomodate new lodgings...designed to haul fish.

    -power cat would work,check width and cost though.

    -old Monk McQueen or Chris Craft Constellation or similar type.

    -best bet IMO is if you have the $$ is a newer an aft cabin aka sundeck cruiser.Some may look a little awkward,but the liveability is unsurpassed...and everyone has their own space.

    From 35' to 42' or so you will have a master aft cabin with full bath, the living area will be over the engine room,and a couple steps down to the galley and front head. Then a standard forward stateroom.
    Around 42'and up you get an extra small stateroom up front and a seperate dinette.

    Go look at pix,join forums on the boat's manufacturer and ask about problems. Go to yachtworld/google and search for "aft cabin"

    Most of the smaller ones are offered with gas engines-they are cheaper to buy,and though more expensive to run it won't matter in your case.

    Try for not having an interior helm-a waste of living space.

    Mine at 50' is as big as one can get without getting caught in the bigger engines/bigger systems/bigger fuel tanks/ twice the cost-for-not-much-more-space spiral.

    Good luck
     
  3. eyschulman
    Joined: Jul 2011
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    eyschulman Senior Member

    Good advice from West Van Han. I would add that you might do better with a single engine trawler version of an aft cabin. Much less maint. and more room around motor. Maybe more economical to run if you leave dock. Get a good survey some of the asian boats had bad plywood rot. good luck.
     
  4. Squidly-Diddly
    Joined: Sep 2007
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    Squidly-Diddly Senior Member

    sounds like you are after the most bashed design on this forum.

    Most of the posters here loath the roomy, tall "floating condo" type motorboat design.

    But I think there is a reason they are big sellers.



    [​IMG]
     
  5. WestVanHan
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    WestVanHan Not a Senior Member

    Thats true ey..also watch the Bayliners from mid 80's to mid 90's-quality control was not great and they skimped out on the glass in many of the hulls....of all places.
     
  6. WestVanHan
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    WestVanHan Not a Senior Member

    Like I said squid..thay can look awkward but the space is amazing.

    Someone here calls them oxygen tents.

    I think I have the best looking aft cabin boat.
     
  7. eyschulman
    Joined: Jul 2011
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    eyschulman Senior Member

    I personally dislike those boats but if you are talking about a dock bound floating home with room and light they are hard to beat unless you go to a houseboat or barge. Many of the type I believe are designed mainly to impress the little lady at the boat show and all kinds of major compromise in the boat department become justified.
     
  8. WestVanHan
    Joined: Aug 2009
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    Location: Vancouver

    WestVanHan Not a Senior Member

    What about Grand Banks...

    You may not like this type,but you have to admit they work great on the BC Coast,Inside Passage, gunkholing,etc. For half the year 99% of the time the water is OK for almost anything.

    One can spend years exploring and never make it past the N tip of Vancouver Island.

    A trawler would be great during storms on the west side of Vancouver island,or winter cruising in rough weather up in the Charlottes...but who goes out in those conditions anyways??
    The trawlers and such are hiding out from the weather in the coves just like I am...


    As I hate having any sensory input-of any kind- from guest's late night visits to the head...in my aft cabin I don't have to contend with that.

    Kinda off topic but cool video..this is not a river..

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hOpzb9p9SBs
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=avRkd5BOE94
     
  9. eyschulman
    Joined: Jul 2011
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    eyschulman Senior Member

    I don't consider the GB and similar tarwler types in the catagory I dislike. I would own a GB if my wife din't have a aversion to them. I am not sure why but she does not like the way they look. I find them and many boats designed by Monk,Seaton and Defever just fine. But its the three deck FG catagory that I would not accept unless I had to. If I needed a relatively cheap liveaboard the big white box might be the answer. I have always tried to match my boats to the use pattern. On the basis of Davids post a big 35-50ft white box may be the best answer.
     
  10. Ike
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    Ike Senior Member

  11. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    Grand Banks was suggested. Good choice and at present the market is slow so you should be able to find a good value.
     
  12. Corley
    Joined: Oct 2009
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    Corley epoxy coated

    A powercat would nearly perfectly fit your SOR the only question mark could relate to long term moorage at the dock/marina the wider beam of the cat would probably cost you more to keep in the water. The good thing about the cat is the privacy they offer you can keep one side of the boat as a "guest" hull and live in the other. The positive is too that it should have a much better cruise speed while retaining good economy when you choose to leave the dock.
     
  13. yipster
    Joined: Oct 2002
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    yipster designer

    [​IMG]
    boats like this plane on dual mercs, gulp gas ok, but may be worth checking
     
  14. Wavewacker
    Joined: Aug 2010
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    Wavewacker Senior Member

    No budget mentioned...how about a 57' Carri-craft, houseboat with cat hulls, tons of living space. Some are still very nice. There is one for sale in Miami that needs TLC but is cheap. These have cruised down to panama and the ICW/gulf area, so you can get out there or just hug the dock. They also made a 42' that would be great to l/b.
     

  15. michael pierzga
    Joined: Dec 2008
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    Looks very practical. Square, maximum space for length.
     
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