best book for introduction to naval architecture

Discussion in 'Education' started by Hunterye, Jun 25, 2007.

  1. Hunterye
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    Hunterye Junior Marine Engineer

    Hi there,

    I'm a freshman of marine engineering at Memorial university. I was just wondering if you guys can recommend me some introduction books about naval engineering. Any advice will be appriciated.
     
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  2. alan white
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    alan white Senior Member

    Gerrs "The Nature of Boats", one I always plug because it's so readable. Good primer. From there, it all depends on your specific interest. Marcaj's "Sail Performance" is very good if you are interested in sail. Others will, I'm sure, add their choices. I'm not a motor guy myself.

    Alan
     
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  3. jehardiman
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    jehardiman Senior Member

    Are we talking about

    a) Naval Engineering, i.e. the design and management of a ships propulsion and auxillary plant;

    b) Naval Architecture, i.e. the theoritical design of complete ships and boats;

    or c) Boat design, i.e. someones rambling opinion interspersed with vague mathamatical calculations and graphs of sometimes dubious worth?
     
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  4. Hunterye
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    Hunterye Junior Marine Engineer

    Thanks for the advice. Have you ever heard or read a book called Principal of Naval Architecture, since my professor recommend to me.
     
  5. jehardiman
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    jehardiman Senior Member

    Principles of Naval Architecture is published by SNAME (Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers). It is presently (1988 edition) a three volume set and is geared towards engineers as a reference and NA students as a comprehensive text. Pricey but worth it. From a cost/value standpoint IMHO it is better to get the older single volume book (1967 edition) as it is more readable and has more tank/tabular data vice CFD/computer program data. In a modern Naval Architecture education you will need a good basic understanding before diving into CFD so you know when somethings wrong.

    Another text comparable to PNA is Basic Ship Theory, a two volume set by Rawson and Tupper. More euro/anglo centric than the american PNA, it covers the same basic ground and realisticly both should sit on your reference shelf.

    Note that both of these texts are about Naval Architecture, that is complete ship design and boat building overview, without getting down in some of the more esoteric weeds like composite skin analysis, optimized catamaran design, SWATH hull parameteric interactions, net reel hydraulic design. there are texts for those also, but a good understanding of hydostatics, hydromechanics, and mission design criteria from a ships point of view forms the foundation that a proper education in any marine specality can be built upon.
     
    Last edited: Jun 27, 2007
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  6. timgoz
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    timgoz Senior Member

    Welcome Hunterye,

    Nice to see a Newfoundlander onboard. Love your island bye. :) I've been to all areas except the Avalon Peninsula.

    Hope your studies go well. This forum will prove a valuable resource. I second Allan's recommendation of Gerr's book.

    Take care.

    Tim
     
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  7. Hunterye
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    Hunterye Junior Marine Engineer

    I guess I would definitely go with PNA now, it seems PNA is an excellent reference, and most nav-archs have it. The only thing is the book is a little bit pricy , but i guess it worth more than the price.
    Tim, I am glad to meet you in this forum and as you said, this is gonna be my daily visit community. I hope you have chances come to the Avalon Peninsula which has whale visit and huge iceberg flowing down from the Greenland. Great place to visit !
     
  8. timgoz
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    timgoz Senior Member

    Once off Cape Makkovik (sp?) Labrador I counted 50+ icebergs while aboard the MV Norhtern Ranger.

    Gerr also has a book on propellers. Do not have it but hear good things.

    Nigel Calder has a book out on boat mechanical & electrical systems thats decent.

    What area are you looking to specialize in?

    Tim
     
  9. Hunterye
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    Hunterye Junior Marine Engineer

    As I mentioned early, I'm just about to specialize in naval engineering since I 've done all my general engineering courses. right now I am on my first work term and thinking about maybe I should start doing some research before entering this industry. Actually I am not just looking for some books which are highly readable and interesting to a freshman, but also advices about career planning. I will have another 5 work terms to go, each is 4 months long. As you know, Canada is rich in ocean resource but lack of competitive companys digging out the potential market here. I really hope I could work abroad such as Europe or Asia.
     
  10. jehardiman
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    jehardiman Senior Member

    Do you have a dream job/position? I might be able to recommend some better books depending on where you want to end up in 4-8 years time.
     
  11. DavidJ
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    DavidJ Senior Member

    I love that statement. It is pretty true, though I do admit I like those books. They were the reason I went into Naval Architecture in the first place. I'd say I was a little surprised when I found out how it was really done.

    Principles of Naval Architecture is excellent reference material, though hardly an introduction.
     
  12. Hunterye
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    Hunterye Junior Marine Engineer

    Hey Jehardiman,

    Regarding to my dream job, I hope I can be a business man running my own company and selling marine product such as: yachts or luxury boats to the booming Asian countries. I see there is great potential market in this economic rapid developing zone.
     
  13. Alik
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    Alik Senior Member

    ...selling marine product such as: yachts or luxury boats to the booming Asian countries...

    Sounds funny. In next 20 years most of luxury yachts and marine products will be built in Asia :)
     
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  14. jehardiman
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    jehardiman Senior Member

    You're in the wrong field to to that quickly. Go get a business or law degree. Money is made by the principals financiers pulling all the product markup and value added out of the product selling price, not by the people who actually do the design or construction (unless of course they are also the financiers). Being able to put together the financial backing is far more important than the product or design.
     
    Last edited: Jun 28, 2007

  15. DanishBagger
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    DanishBagger Never Again

    Haha, Jehardiman, that statement puts your signature into context, methinks :–)
     
    Last edited: Jun 28, 2007
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