Bedding Teak and the Cost of a Space Flight to Mars.

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by Asleep Helmsman, Oct 26, 2020.

  1. Asleep Helmsman
    Joined: Jul 2008
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    Asleep Helmsman Senior Member

    This boat does not have teak decks. It does have a lot of teak trim, the bow sprit, doors, etc. and I'm building teak porthole decorative frames. All of being replaced.

    I always find it amusing that anti-varnished teak people have such strong opinions about this. One of my best friends down here, can't understand how anyone could care about aesthetics. And, he built his own 39 foot Warrem cat, for 10 years. He went for low maintenance in every decision, and thinks the rest of us should as well.
     
  2. Rumars
    Joined: Mar 2013
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    Rumars Senior Member

    The only problem I see with your plan are the screws. The Pearson 35 has a balsa cored deck, and today that combination is not considered appropriate anymore. The preferred option is glueing, wich also has the advantage of beeing cheaper (less teak used).
     
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  3. BlueBell
    Joined: May 2017
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    BlueBell Ahhhhh...

    Cost in time and money, weight, return (little to none, may even be detrimental).
    What are the other teak pieces attached to if not structural?
     
  4. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    gonzo Senior Member

    If I were going to Mars, my decks would be of impeccable oiled Burma teak. The Martians are very particular on what kind of surface their ambassadors walk on. I heard the Russian mission failed to secure mineral rights because their decks were painted.
     
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  5. Asleep Helmsman
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    Asleep Helmsman Senior Member

    Doors and hatches
     
  6. Asleep Helmsman
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    Asleep Helmsman Senior Member

    Wow, this is something.
    Ok, so you're saying get rid of the screws altogether and bed it down with filled epoxy? I like that.

    Of course many folks recommend some form of polyurethane adhesive. What are your thoughts on that?
     
    Last edited: Oct 30, 2020

  7. Rumars
    Joined: Mar 2013
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    Rumars Senior Member

    That's exactly what I've been saying, no screws and glue the deck down. There are several glue options, West 105, Pro Set, Teak Decking Systems own epoxy, Simson MSR, etc. There are also several ways to do it, from panels made off the boat and glued as a whole piece to the deck, to individually glueing every piece in place.
    For a balsa cored deck I would choose premade panels vacuum bagged to the deck with epoxy. This avoids any and all screws, even temporary ones. The seams can be grafite filled epoxy or PU.
    For you the additional advantage of glueing the teak is that you only need to paint the deck (or regelcoat) only where there is no teak.
    If you plan to leave the deck bare to age naturally or scrub it white with citric acid I would consider an alternative wood like iroko or black locust.
     
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