Bedding Teak and the Cost of a Space Flight to Mars.

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by Asleep Helmsman, Oct 26, 2020 at 12:27 PM.

  1. Asleep Helmsman
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    Asleep Helmsman Senior Member

    It's not really about the Mars thing.

    I'm replacing all the teak on my Pearson 35. On the pieces that are to be attached to the structure, can anyone think of any reason I should not put an epoxy coat on the backside of these pieces prior to attaching?
    I would let the epoxy cure first. The teak will be installed using 4200 (or maybe 4000) , and screws.
     
  2. fallguy
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    fallguy Senior Member

    There is little advantage to sealing the teak on the back. In fact, it could be a negative.

    If water does make its way to the bottom edge; it will tend to pool above the epoxy and may drive rot faster than water that can disburse throughout. Water ingress is bad.

    I, personally see no advantage to sealing it and only a possible downside.

    More effort at minimizing ingress and upkeep on the top wpuld be my tack.
     
  3. Blueknarr
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    Blueknarr Senior Member

    Little to no benefit to it.

    The oils in the teak will prevent a good bond either to the epoxy or the bedding compound.
    There might be a great bond between the epoxy and the bedding.
     
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  4. Rumars
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    Rumars Senior Member

    There are epoxys formulated for teak, but if you are screwing they are a waste of money. Teak is used because it is rot resistant and light, it needs no epoxy protection. New decks are glued on, the effective wear surface is the same as with the much thicker screwed decks because with those the limit is the bung thickness.
    So you have a choice, epoxy and thin teak, or screws and PU caulking.
     
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  5. CT249
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    CT249 Senior Member

    I thought you were going to say that a new teak deck is about as expensive as a ticket to Mars, and you may not be too far wrong.
     
  6. Asleep Helmsman
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    Asleep Helmsman Senior Member

    People keep saying this. I have been building things out of teak for more than 40 years. Haven't had a single joinery failure base on teak "not bonding". I think people squeeze their epoxy joints to tight.
     
  7. Asleep Helmsman
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    Asleep Helmsman Senior Member

    That was the joke. Thank you for catching it.
     
  8. kapnD
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    kapnD Senior Member

    Id see this as a brilliant opportunity to eliminate the teak and it’s associated problems, maintenance and expense!
     
  9. Blueknarr
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    Blueknarr Senior Member

    I have spent a similar length of time applying coatings to wood and metal. When I had wholesale adhesion failure it was usually to brass teak or rosewood.

    Teak's reputation for poor adhesion is earned.
     

  10. fallguy
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    fallguy Senior Member

    teaks vary greatly in oil content; I have limited experience, but one piece here is oily to the touch and another feels dry as a bone

    I'd guess it is very anecdotal stick to stick and species to species.

    But I see no upside to glazing the bottom. The idea is to prevent water from getting there first place.
     
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