Bedding Compound?

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by flydog, Dec 19, 2006.

  1. flydog
    Joined: Oct 2006
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    flydog Junior Member

    I am building my first boat, a 12' sailing dinghy. The plans say to use DOLFINITE bedding compound when attaching the keel, daggerboard trunk, and siderails. Is this recommended in order to replace said items when they are worn or damaged?

    flydog
     
  2. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Dofinite is an oil based bedding compound, which stays flexible for many decades. It's a traditional bedding and I find it still very serviceable when disassembling a 50 year old yacht. There are other, more modern materials you can use, but all will have good and bad points to consider about them.

    Dolfinite is generally recommended when disassembly is expected in the future. Rails, center/daggerboard trunks and false keels would fall into this category. Repairs, renewing caulk, maintenance, etc. may require the removal of these pieces at some point in the future. An adhesive/sealant like the polyurethanes, may make part removal more difficult, without damage.
     
  3. FAST FRED
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    FAST FRED Senior Member

    Dolphinite is a heck of a lot easier to clean up, on initial application or after years of service , than the polly glue goops.

    FF
     
  4. flydog
    Joined: Oct 2006
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    flydog Junior Member

    bwdding compund

    How would 3M 101 or SILKAFLEX comapare to DOLFINITE?

    flydog
     
  5. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    3M 101 is a polysulfide and quite different chemically then a traditional oil based bedding compound. The biggest differences are a traditional bedding doesn't offer any adhesive qualities (fasteners do the holding), while the more modern materials do. Some of the newer products, like 3M 5200 have such a high adhesive grip, that removing the part, to renew the bedding (a maintenance necessity) usually involves tearing up perfectly good base material and difficult surface cleaning after the bulk has been removed. 3M 101 has a much less aggressive stick 'em then 5200, but still can be a pain to clean up. Many oil based beddings can't be painted without special primers or prep (some not at all) so the seam will always show or have some bedding color bleed through.

    This is your first build. The best advise anyone can provide is "stick to the plans" unless the plans are so old you can't find a particular product or material. If you do run into this problem, then drop in and ask. There are many new products that have replaced the older stuff, but some of the old stuff is still the best to use. As you gain building experience and expertise with materials or methods, you can experiment with some of the more exotic goos, stick 'ems or other materials available.
     
  6. dskira

    dskira Previous Member

    I like Dolphinite but the price is taking paople for suckers.
    Don't buy it. $37 a little half a quart can? They think it's gold, it is just a mixture of rosin and oil. Do it yourself for $37 for 5 gallons!
    Daniel
     
  7. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Carbon Based Life Form

    3M 5200 would be a modern product for that application. Its main benefit is to keep rot from jumping from the one piece of wood to the other in addition to giving a tight seal.
     

  8. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Carbon Based Life Form

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