Bearding Line

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by PAUL XAVIER, Jun 4, 2014.

  1. PAUL XAVIER
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    PAUL XAVIER Junior Member

    Hi,
    May anybody here please explain "bearding line", what is its significance?
    TY :)
     
  2. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    The planking lands on a stem or deadwood assembly and is defined with an outer rabbit line, where the planking first hits and the inner corners of this notch (rabbit) called the bearding lines. Most rabbits have a single bearding line, though some can have more than one. This single bearding line is where the corner of the planking lives, inside the rabbit.
     
  3. DCockey
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    DCockey Senior Member

    To expand on Paul's excellent response, a bearding line is usually defined for a boat with wood planking. I've seen it defined on plans where the lines are drawn to the inside of the planking.
     
  4. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Yeah, it's the bottom of the notch, cut into the stem or deadwood, though it could also be the inside corner of a plate landing too.
     
  5. Petros
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    Petros Senior Member

    curious name for this line. I often see it and wonder how it came about. on older ships does it somehow resemble a "beard" on the drawing?
     
  6. latestarter
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    latestarter Senior Member

  7. philSweet
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    philSweet Senior Member

    I was hoping Peter R. or Loftsman would turn up.

    Bearding line, originally, meant where bearding began. And what was bearding you ask? Apparently, it referred to shaving down a timber end such as a futtock notched into the keel back in the 1700's. Later, bearding was the sharp edge of a beveled board to American carpenters (1800's). See https://archive.org/details/knightsamericanm02knig. The current definition that the bearding line is a line on the keel, etc, that is flush with the outer face of the the frames, bulkheads and such doesn't really help much because that could either be on the face of the timber, or where it is incised.

    At any rate, it is a traditional reference and one of the very first reference lines to actually appear on the boat as it is being built. Once you had the keel laid, the bearding line, and a bend, the yard apes could take it from there and they couldn't mess it up too badly.
     
  8. Petros
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    Petros Senior Member

    so once the old hairless clean shaven senior carpenter marks the line, all of the bearded less experienced guys can have at it?
     
  9. waikikin
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    waikikin Senior Member

    So....? is the bearded guys gear not sharp enough?
     
  10. Petros
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    Petros Senior Member

    me thinks it is not about how sharp the tools, but knowing exactly where to place it.
     
  11. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    My understanding is as Phil describes. A beveled board was said to have a beard, meaning the bevel itself, looked like a well trimmed beard. The beginning of this bevel or rabbit would be the bearding line to a carpenter. In some plans you'd have two, referred to as the back and front bearding lines, sometimes the upper and lower or inner and outer bearding lines. For most skilled carpenters, the upper line was all they needed, as it was assumed the lower would be a specific depth and perpendicular, so it's notation on plans wasn't as necessary.
     
  12. rwatson
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    rwatson Senior Member

    Considering the planking thickness is very specific, that makes a lot of sense. Especially since you cant expect millimetre thicknessing of larger planked boats.

    I think every carpenter works on the "this side has to be placed here ... so I cant do much about the other side".

    After spending the last three weeks framing up the inside corner of an 80 year old shed (not square and not level ) if I get within a couple of centimeters of the planned mark, I have a celebratory cup of tea.
     
  13. rxcomposite
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    rxcomposite Senior Member


  14. waikikin
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    waikikin Senior Member


    I'm thinking in the :"modern world" the term, although not commonly used in ordinary conversation/news articles etc is inter-changeable with planking thickness deduction, wether at the stem/keel/sternpost/midsection...... etc..... I'm not sure if I'm old fashioned but when you shave off the beard/planking you arrive at what lies underneath..... the frames/timbers/hog/keel/rabbet/& all other said "molded planes/compounds/intersections" wether they be a line or molded plane of frame to planking/foam/plating........... back in the day I've done a couple of bearding line developments, good info for trad built & thick timber planking, at perpendicular to stem/ forefoot & the like, not so hard on the lines plan or loft floor & saved some effort on the job but especially of interest with very shapely planked vessels.

    Jeff.
     
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