Bead and Cove Router Bits - Where to buy in USA?

Discussion in 'Boatbuilding' started by CatBuilder, Dec 18, 2010.

  1. CatBuilder

    CatBuilder Previous Member

    Scarf joints are coming out like sh*t. Is there a way to do them that doesn't involve putting them on edge and using a circular saw? Table saw? Any other way?
     
  2. War Whoop
    Joined: Jun 2003
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    War Whoop Senior Member

    No I use the batten as a guide for the base of the router.
     
  3. War Whoop
    Joined: Jun 2003
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    War Whoop Senior Member

    Yes a simple fixture on a table saw,or band saw ,two long wedges and a router setup with a mortising bit.
     
  4. CatBuilder

    CatBuilder Previous Member

    Ahh... yes! I much simpler jig than I thought for the table saw.

    Here is a link to some other forum and a guy who made a nice jig for his table saw... real cheap.

    Last time I scarfed (the only time) I was doing giant stacks of 3mm plywood with 12:1 scarfs. This is a different animal than the plywood scarfs, which were actually very easy. Did the "stack, clamp and grind/sand" method on those. The circular saw was just too in accurate (ok, maybe I was) and it was coming out bad.

    Time to go out and try this method now. Looks good! (see link)

    http://www.gatorboats.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=716
     
  5. SamSam
    Joined: Feb 2005
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    SamSam Senior Member

    You can cut them freehand on a tablesaw for what you need. If you don't have a tablesaw, you can drill 4 holes in your circular saw base/plateen, and then make a plunge cut into a piece of scrap ply.

    Unplug it and then screw the saw to the ply with some screws. Turn the ply over and screw/nail or clamp it to some sawhorses. Cut or break off the excess screw threads holding the saw, then wire down the trigger. Plug it in to turn it on and off.

    That's a crude tablesaw I've used numerous times. To rig up a fence, put a straight edge lightly against the blade and then draw a line. That's zero. To set the fence, measure off the distance in front and back and clamp the straight edge there.

    If you want to tilt the saw blade you have to widen the blade slot in the ply.
     
  6. War Whoop
    Joined: Jun 2003
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    War Whoop Senior Member


    Exactly!
     
  7. CatBuilder

    CatBuilder Previous Member

    And that jig is working like a charm. I have perfect 8:1 scarfs going now. Thanks, and thanks to that mystery guy from the other forum too.

    I did a test piece today, trying out the router (with no guide) and the jigsaw on vertical pieces of 3/4" plywood. The jigsaw was easier to do because I could see the line to cut to better.

    Any reason I should use a router and jig, or can I just cut "C" shapes (with a flat bottom, of course to meet the batten) out of the standing forms?

    Crazy thing is... it's already time to start figuring out how I'll lay the foam and do the glassing. Some battens need to be left out to get started on that.
     
  8. War Whoop
    Joined: Jun 2003
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    War Whoop Senior Member

    See what line? you cut from the top edge to a set depth with a router, the width and the location are what you need to setup.
     
  9. CatBuilder

    CatBuilder Previous Member

    Oh man, I'm dumb when it comes to woodworking!
    I was doing it all wrong... like an idiot!

    I was going at the vertical sheet of plywood holding the router *horizontally* to it! Feel free to laugh at me.

    [​IMG]

    I'll have to try that again using the router from the TOP this time.

    Incidentally, won't the router not work properly due to the curve of the hull shape in the form then? If I got at it from the top, I can't cut a square line since my router will follow the curve. Is that a big deal?
     
  10. War Whoop
    Joined: Jun 2003
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    War Whoop Senior Member

    Just use a router with a small base and over cut a little to compensate for the inside radius if you have too (note your battens are flat) since you are concerned only about the middle here,the sides will be down.
     
  11. jjb
    Joined: Sep 2011
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    jjb New Member

    i know

    This is an old topic but did u ever think about using a quarter round bit at two passes for ur bead and a one inch ball mill bit?
     

  12. cthippo
    Joined: Sep 2010
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    cthippo Senior Member

    Welcome aboard, JJB!

    I don't know if he did, but being also in the process of setting up a bead and cove operation I would say that not only would double the number of passes, but also increase the potential for screw-ups.

    While not for routers (at least not without an adaptor), Corob Cutters sells 1" bead and cove shaper heads. I bought a pair of their 1/4" bead and cove cutters for my strip machine, but I'm still waiting on the motors to drive them.
     
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