Battery acid and salt water

Discussion in 'OnBoard Electronics & Controls' started by chabrenas, Jan 15, 2009.

  1. robherc
    Joined: Dec 2008
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    robherc Designer/Hobbyist

    oops, 0.21cal fuel lump ;) (just checked the volumes)
     
  2. chabrenas
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    chabrenas Mike K-H

    Maybe you will from now on. All that training has finally paid off...
     
  3. chabrenas
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    chabrenas Mike K-H

    O.25cal vs 0.21cal? Close enough for government work...

    Wonder if this is going to up the budget for competitors in the next Vendée Globe?
     
  4. MattZ
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    MattZ Junior Member

    You may get some hydrogen chloride (HCl) gas, but very little since this gas is highly soluble in water.

    If the sea water gets into the battery you have a different problem that could produce chlorine, and possibly increase the hydrogen output because any sodium metal produced by electrolysis will immediately react with water to produce hydrogen gas.
     
    Last edited: Sep 8, 2009
  5. chabrenas
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    chabrenas Mike K-H

    Thanks, MattZ. Can anyone post the equations for the reactions that take place?
     
  6. MattZ
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    MattZ Junior Member

    H+ + Cl- <----> HCl(aq)

    Note the double ended arrow, this is a chemical equilibrium. The HCl could then come out of solution. It is a very toxic gas, and on contact with water it will readily dissolve in water to make hydrochloric acid. Due to the high dissociativity of HCl, the yield of HCl should be very small.

    Na+ + e- -----> Na
    2 Na + 2H20 ------> H2 + 2 OH-
     
  7. Submarine Tom

    Submarine Tom Previous Member

    Post number 4 on this thread claims an incorrect average ocean salinity of 2 - 3 %.

    The correct figure is 3.9% by weight.

    Tom
     

  8. MattZ
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    MattZ Junior Member

    3.1% - 3.8%

    Varies based on temperature and location. (Typically higher at the equator and poles, lower at the mid latitudes.
     
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