Basalt fiber

Discussion in 'Materials' started by Jim Allen, Nov 23, 2017.

  1. fallguy
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    fallguy Senior Member

    So, it is my charge to go to the school of interpretive error checking? LOL

    He can correct it rather easily. Well, maybe.
     
  2. Jim Allen
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    Jim Allen Junior Member

    . Ok, so it seems I have a little space..I have learned quite alot so far the day..that's awesome
    A
     
  3. Jim Allen
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    Jim Allen Junior Member

    Sooo, what is the final address about the basalt ..
    To me it's a very arongtool, I think it's new so it's not fiberglass yet however,if I had a vacuum I'd def try it on a courner.. I'm about to get into it.here in a few. That's sad when my best thrll was reading a funny.
     
  4. fallguy
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    fallguy Senior Member

  5. fallguy
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    fallguy Senior Member

    It isn't new. Per the article, there is lots of basalt formations in the US, but the glass industry never adopted it in the 70s. The Soviet bloc did, though, and when the Soviet Union broke up; the information became declassified and the use of basalt become more commercialized.
     
  6. Jim Allen
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    Jim Allen Junior Member

    Great question fall guy! My mother has that very badly so we would have to say that it doesn't. Help it any. Anday comtain more of it that others.
     
  7. rwatson
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    rwatson Senior Member

    Try post number 29 - with a detailed study of the properties.
    Bear in mind that a lot of knowledge will be proprietary to each manufacturers application, and education will have to be more than a Google search.
    Like the bulletproof transom, their research and layup wont be publicly available.
     
  8. Jim Allen
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    Jim Allen Junior Member

    Def not new.. I'm gonna give me opinion o. It for what it's worth. It's probably the best composit that I've seen others use..and I believe that it takes so me time..you treat her bad and go for the goal early your vomma wish ya didn't.
     
  9. TANSL
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    TANSL Senior Member

    Very interesting the link in your post # 29. I'm sorry I did not read it before. That clarifies some of my questions. I understand that, for now, some aspects and results of these experiments can not be made public.
    My question remains, therefore, how this material should be applied in practice to the construction of ships in a way that is acceptable to regulatory entities. Do you know if any CS, or ISO standards, accept it as a composite material for the construction of boats ?. If so, what minimum properties are required, do they establish some special construction procedure ?.
     
  10. Jim Allen
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    Jim Allen Junior Member

    I a
    I would like to say that from the few post you see here and there I can say that basalt knowledge is the reason it's not more than it is. Now I've used about 6 different of the fabrics and I have to say that from what I've witnessed there's nothing out there rite now that can compete with it. Viacost , strength, life, there's a matt that is a showstopper. I've used the product my company sales along with basalt and we was striving to take a reacter pipe that's very hot and wrapped it in basalt mat and my nano ceramics coatings and no other material could have held the temps the basalt did without flaring
     
  11. TANSL
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    TANSL Senior Member

    As you know, fortunately, shipbuilding is highly regulated, and some materials and procedures are not easily accepted by regulatory entities. I know well ISO-12215 standards, which applies to the scantling of small boats, and it does not include basalt. Therefore, I do not believe that, today, a boat built with this material will be accepted.
    I am used to always having to comply with certain regulations, I do not doubt the qualities of basalt, at all, I only doubt that, for the structure of certain vessels, nowadays its use is allowed. And, if I am wrong, I would like to know the existing protocols for its use.
     
  12. Jim Allen
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    Jim Allen Junior Member

    That is a great point ..however, let's pull ships out of the equation. What would be stopping a popular boat builder to consider it..price? Knowledge? And I believe that basapt is far superior than glass , however, people don't like change. They have had glass for ions..but does it mean it's not far superior?
     
  13. rwatson
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    rwatson Senior Member

    Its surely just an engineering exercise, as the actual physical properties of Basalt are well documented, especially by the vendors of the various products, who would ( or would not) have ISO accreditation.
    I would expect that any engineer prepared to risk his liability insurance would also have done enough physical testing on the product to keep him out of court.
    This is not really any different to other composite certification. The characteristics of Basalt compare closely to E glass, and that IS a product that many boatbuilders have used.


    "Therefore, I do not believe that, today, a boat built with this material will be accepted."


    Umm, this is a crazy statement. Thousands of boats have been built using it, and I assume from their cost, have been accepted for insurance.
    Africancats.com http://www.africancats.com/fastcatgreencat-445-world-cruiser
    2017 – Vincent Lebailly Yacht Design http://www.vincentlebailly.fr/en/2017/
    https://fi.pinterest.com/pin/294704369348670141/
    Basalt in Marine Industry Archives - Basalt Guru https://www.basalt.guru/category/basalt-in-marine-industry/
    Basalt composite got used for trimarans in France http://basalt.today/2017/02/9603/

    just go and look them up for yourself.

    trimaran_basalttoday.png
     
  14. Jim Allen
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    Jim Allen Junior Member

    Don't think basalts fab Matt is going to break down a technology sit-in..however, there are some basalt products that are really breaking some long standing rules. There's a utube vid out that titles basalt vs glass..it's 2 min and that will get ya exciyed. As I've sad for 4 years my career goal is to have a version of the panga made of basalt. made of only basalt. .now my goal was to also have the first hull without any ribs or spars. Instead it would be nano ceramics rods they would sample in china.. thanks for basapt is used a the rite places it's gonna be hear awhile..
     

  15. TANSL
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    TANSL Senior Member

    I do not want to take away your reason but let me make a consideration. For many ships steel is the ideal material, even could not be built with other material, which does not mean that it is the right material for all boats. Basalt can be an excellent material for many things, but not for all. In each boat you have to determine, contemplating many parameters, which is the ideal material.
    You talk about the incombustibility of basalt but bear in mind that in ships, in many cases, not only is it required that the material of the structure be incombustible, but not deformed. That is, a bulkhead for example not only must be incombustible but must continue to maintain its structural integrity for a certain time.
     
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