Basalt fiber

Discussion in 'Materials' started by Jim Allen, Nov 23, 2017.

  1. Jim Allen
    Joined: Nov 2017
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    Jim Allen Junior Member

    Hi, I've been using basalt fabric for about a year on anything that I would usually use fiberglass for. My question is do you think a hull made of basalt and epoxy could be built and if so would it be to costly compared to fiberglass or would weight become an issue. I've mainly used the woven Matt and the chop. And both of those are extremely strong. However, I've seen several new basalt fabrics which I feel could be a perfect thickness for the bottom of the hull and then a less of a material for the sides with maybe a foam middle. Does anyone have any opinions on this and what would be your feelings. I think weight would be close to glass however, much stronger. I live on the gulf coast of Florida where our bays are shallow and hitting a oyster bed is always happening which doesn't do to well on glass but I believe basalt would handle it much better. Thank you,
     
  2. rwatson
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    rwatson Senior Member

    I have just been reviewing Basalt and Fiberglass, and it seems that with Epoxy, Basalt is a great alternative. The Surfboard shops are using it here in Australia, and the cost/weight properties are extremely competitive. I came across one video where they fired a gun at the transom of a motorboat. The bullet went right through the fiberglass transom, but bounced off the Basalt laid transom.
    I am sure that cloth suppliers would be able to recommend the correct type of cloth. maybe one with Basalt and Carbon combined, as there are many mixtures of materials for optimum results..
     
  3. Jim Allen
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    Jim Allen Junior Member

    It's definitely a good material..I've been using it for over a year but never in a vacuum situation. Which let's be honest that's the future there. Which won't break my heart. I'm building a small boat today made of choose and basapt over lay.
     
  4. TANSL
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    TANSL Senior Member

    Without wishing to argue with you both, because in general I agree with you, I would just like to point out that, for example, a cement transom (not ferrocement) can easily stop a bullet but be totally inadequate to withstand the loads and vibrations transmitted by the outboard engine.
    Basalt has amazing properties but I miss studies (as there are, in huge quantities, for FRP) that tell us how and where they can be used and how to control the many parameters that can make a laminate completely disastrous .
    So, let's bet on basalt and use it when we know how to use it correctly. It is just my opinion.
     
  5. Jim Allen
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    Jim Allen Junior Member

    You are correct. I use the basalt on things that I can afford to screw up. I do all my testing on small mock up models. Lol.
     
  6. fallguy
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    fallguy Senior Member

    In my googling on basalt; mostly to learn and not attempt to impart google wisdom to strangers, I found a few things to be interesting.

    -basalt is more toxic to human skin
    -basalt research died here in the US eventhough there is plenty of basalt available
    -basalt is more popular in India and Serbia
    -basalt is easier to produce and produces laminates that are slightly stronger
    -basalt is also dangerous inhaled (I can't imagine fiberglass is good, but basalt isn't any better)

    if I'm wrong, blame the great google and remember I am at least honest
     
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  7. TANSL
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    TANSL Senior Member

    I'm glad you're so rigorous, Jim. It is not easy, even in works with PRF that are very regulated, to find manufacturers as conscientious as you are. Congratulations. LOL
     
  8. Jim Allen
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    Jim Allen Junior Member

    Hey I had read that. I'm so thankful for your reply. My question to this thread was looking to find a material that is recommended by you guys with knowledge. Would you mind telling me what materials that you would recommend for building a hull? I do like that choose board but was wondering what you would cover it with. Thank you
     
  9. TANSL
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    TANSL Senior Member

    The ship's material can not be chosen if the SOR of the project is not known. Not all materials are used for everything or, at least, they may not be the best for the work that the boat must do.
     
  10. Jim Allen
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    Jim Allen Junior Member

    Hey fallguy, I am building a mini boat that will be 8x4x16 inch sides.i am using it for to stay within the law. Basically there will be 2 nets inside of that hull and 2 inside my boat. Can you recommend a material that is light and strong? What about either nida core r gladgicil with a fabric cover? I'd also like to have a little foam in there as well. Thank you kindly.
     
  11. TANSL
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    TANSL Senior Member

    I think your intention to innovate is very commendable and I encourage you to do so, but keep in mind that in such a small boat, using one fiber or another will not change the weight of the hull much.
     
  12. Jim Allen
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    Jim Allen Junior Member

    Thank you again. I'm not as much worried about the weight of it as I am the durability. These little boats get beat up fairly bad and I just want to produce the best product I can. Also, I'm going to be making 10 to 15 of these hulls to sell to fellow fisherman. My main bit of drama is that I cannot stand fiberglass over wood . Also price is a issue. Trying to keep my cost in that area of glass and basapt Matt..
     
  13. ondarvr
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    ondarvr Senior Member

    I don't see basalt out there in the shops, not that fabricators and engineers don't talk about it, but for one reason or another it just doesn't get spec'd for the projects.

    It seems to me you're trying to convince yourself and others that basalt "is the best fiber", not "what is the best fiber for my project."
     
  14. Jim Allen
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    Jim Allen Junior Member

    Sir I'm really not sure what you was reading but I don't think any of that was said. I have used basalt and actually do like it..sir with all do respect why would you get irritated with what I supposably said about basalt. I am not a basalt guru or for that matter I'm not any kind of fabric freak. Just had stated that I've used it for about a year when I had a job that required either basalt or fiberglass. Lastly, I've only been to one place to get materials and that is the place that had nida core, gladgicil, marine plywood, choosa, poly foam, PVC etc..of those my personal opinion is that gladgicil with basalt cover is my favorite. What is yours.
     

  15. TANSL
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    TANSL Senior Member

    But Jim Allen, with all due respect, the favorite material for what?
     
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