Basalt, anyone tried it in hulls?

Discussion in 'Materials' started by chiroeurope, Nov 4, 2012.

  1. chiroeurope
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    chiroeurope Junior Member

    Just doing some research in hull materials and came across basalt fiber and find it very interesting. I see that it has been used in some small motor boat hulls and was wondering if anyone knows of folks using it in large hull forms. It is interesting in that it is cheaper the standard glass fiber and stronger. Can be used with both resins and cement is lighter and stronger then steel. While not as strong as Carbon fiber it is UV stable.

    So just wondering as while I am finding a lot of information and there are down sides (sharp angles have to be preformed as currently there is not on site ability to stress form the material). Just asking for other input.

    Michael
     
  2. TeddyDiver
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    TeddyDiver Gollywobbler

    Yes, I'm building 35' hull. It's strip planked core with glass and basalt biax over. Donno what you mean about sharp angles bcs it's the same thing with glass and basalt. I've found basalt to wet a bit easier with epoxy than glass.
     
  3. chiroeurope
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    chiroeurope Junior Member

    Teddy,

    Thanks and I was referring to Basalt bars in that they can't be bent on site and have to be pre-bent. Nice to hear and interesting as well. Thanks for your reply.

    Michael
     
  4. TeddyDiver
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    TeddyDiver Gollywobbler

    Just a though but how about using unidirectonal fibers to laminate composite bars bent as you want?
     
  5. portsmouthmarin

    portsmouthmarin Previous Member

    Gideon of FastCat / African Cats built boats from Basalt.
     
  6. chiroeurope
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    chiroeurope Junior Member

    Thanks, I looked them up and interesting information. Gives me a good bit to think on in some of the design work. The boat is being based of a bluff bow type schooner and this gives some interesting ideas.

    Michael
     
  7. Petros
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    Petros Senior Member

    Basault, the volcanic rock? what are the properties of a basault/epoxy composite as compared to say fiberglass or carbon? what is the cost relative to other materials?

    Is it less ichy to work with that fiberglass? I would switch for that reason alone.
     
  8. jonr
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    jonr Senior Member

    As a cloth, about the same as S-glass.
     
  9. upchurchmr
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    upchurchmr Senior Member

    Anyone know where you can get it in the US?
    I understood it was developed in Russia. Perhaps it is all made there?
     
  10. chiroeurope
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    chiroeurope Junior Member

    No you can get it in the US via a couple of firms (I will look them back up and post as I am in the UK).

    The higher quality comes out of Ukraine and that region. China is also producing it but I have not heard the best on their quality control and as such am not interested in trying it out.

    There is a group down in Italy, Texas that uses for dome construction homes and are somewhat near you.

    Depending on who is doing the documentation you are looking at 1/4 the weight of steel for 3 times the strength. That is in the form of both rod and rope. Other ratings I don't have to hand at the moment. Here is a link to a US company and their data page on comparing similar materials:http://www.sudaglass.com/chars.html

    Hope that helps folks.

    Michael
     
  11. JRD
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    JRD Senior Member

    http://www.solarcomposites.com/composites/compositehybrid.html#CF

    I have purchased CF fabric from these guys in US, and I'm in New Zealand. Found them very helpful and prompt. They sell hybrids of basalt and glass, and basalt and carbon from the breif look I had on their website.
     
  12. rwatson
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    rwatson Senior Member

    "History

    The first attempts to produce basalt fiber were made in the United States in 1923. These were further developed after World War II by researchers in the USA, Europe and the Soviet Union especially for military and aerospace applications. Since declassification in 1995 basalt fibers have been used in a wider range of civilian applications."

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Basalt_fiber


    " Manufacture

    Basalt fiber is made from a single material, crushed basalt, from a carefully chosen quarry source and unlike other materials such as glass fiber, essentially no materials are added. The basalt is simply washed and then sent to be melted down.[1]"
     
  13. rwatson
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    rwatson Senior Member

    more detailed analysis of basalt

    http://www.compositesworld.com/articles/basalt-fibers-alternative-to-glass


    "Today, basalt fiber research, production and most marketing efforts are based in countries once aligned with the Soviet bloc. Companies currently involved in production and marketing include Kamenny Vek (Dubna, Russia), Technobasalt (Kyiv, Ukraine), Hengdian Group Shanghai Russia & Gold Basalt Fibre Co. (Shanghai, China), and OJSC Research Institute Glassplastics and Fiber (Bucha, Ukraine). Basaltex, a division of Masureel Holding (Wevelgem, Belgium), and Sudaglass Fiber Technology Inc. (Houston, Texas) convert basalt fiber into woven and nonwoven reinforcement forms for the European and North American markets, respectively. "


    "Like glass filaments, basalt filaments are formed by platinum-rhodium bushings. As they cool, a sizing agent is applied and the filaments are moved to speed-controlled fiber stretching equipment and then on winding equipment, where the fiber is spooled.

    Because the basalt filament is more abrasive than glass, the expensive bushings once needed more frequent refurbishing. As bushings wear, their cylindrical holes wear unevenly, degrading process control. Without timely maintenance, the out-of-round apertures form filaments with an unacceptably wide diameter range, producing a roving with unpredictable breaking loads, explains Nolf. "

    "Basaltex, for example, found early on that woven basalt fabrics straight from a weaver's loom were fragile and easily damaged when handled, exhibiting broken fibers when sharply folded or bent, and were irritating to the skin. In order to make the product more stable, Basaltex developed a proprietary silane-based sizing that facilitates the post-manufacture processing. "
     
  14. tunnels

    tunnels Previous Member

    Hi i asked the same question about the begining of last year but wasnt going any where quickly . I also was looking at using it in Hulls in the 6 mtr and a little bigger range .
    Way back in the dimdark ages all power boat used CSM AND WOVERN ROVING and to this very day it is still the same . AS a sales ploy i was going to introduce Basalt in the form of triaxle in the bottom panels and that way be able to use Vinylester resin In just the bottom and so would be stiffer stronger and way lighter than whats any where in the market to this day !!. OF course also doing a whole number job on the internal Grid as well ! Over all it was a possablity of plucking easy 10% of the weight out and with infusion even more !
    Most people think its the hull thats the heavy part but its not its all the deck and creature comforts that go inside is where the excess weight saving need to take place better design and better light weight cores and materials ( not core matts ) to make the decks and all thats attached to it .Yes core matt is good but a thin foam core is better with a better glass each side !! How many people would it take to lift a 6 mtr bow rider ! no motor of course !:confused:
     

  15. rxcomposite
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    rxcomposite Senior Member

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