Banque Populaire V-Jules Verne Record Attempt- 11/21/11

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by Doug Lord, Nov 21, 2011.

  1. gypsy28
    Joined: Mar 2010
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    gypsy28 Senior Member

    Im an Australian and most of the noise that comes out of an Australians mouth is bulls#!&

    Internet posts seem to be somewhat lost in translation;)
     
  2. Doug Lord
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    Doug Lord Flight Ready

    Bp V Jv

    From Scuttlebutt Europe today:

    Looks Like The South

    It has barely been a week of racing and already good news for Maxi Banque Populaire V. By crossing the equator at 00 hours 26 minutes and 52 seconds (Paris time) last night, after 5 days 14 hours 55 minutes and 10 seconds * at sea, Loick Peyron and his men are now the fastest of all time on this section of the Jules Verne Trophy. A record that is a good omen for what is next, promising to be just as fluid on the approach of St. Helena.

    Improved by half an hour, the new reference time between Ushant and Equator becomes the property of the Maxi Banque Populaire V.

    The famous St. Helena anticyclone, a southern match of the Azores', appears under the best conditions. Currently at 220 miles off the Brazilian coast in a South-East wind, the Maxi Banque Populaire V sailing conditions are relatively uncomfortable for men - the sea coming upfront the bow - but still allow the machine to display some satisfactory speed. In a few hours, the setting will change, to the delight of all, as explained this afternoon by Jean-Baptiste Le Vaillant: "The wind begins to rotate a bit. We'll gradually go around the anticyclone. It's going to become more comfortable and it will be easier to sleep. We are not sailing tailwind yet so we have the sea movements facing the boat which makes us wriggling in all directions. But we all know it won't last, that it will get better by tomorrow. So we just bear with it. For now, the weather is wonderful. These are the trade winds in Brazil ". Marcel van Triest to add: "At that time, which is relatively early, the St. Helena anticyclone is quite south, although strong and big, but we have good circulation around it."

    With the Equator behind them, Loick Peyron and his crew should thus have an open road in front of them for the descent of the Atlantic. About the transition to Good Hope, Team Banque Populaire's router wanted to be particularly clear and optimistic: "I see us passing the Cape of Good Hope in the thirteen days for sure, maybe in the twelve and a half days ... "

    * Subject to validation by the WSSRC

    www.voile.banquepopulaire.fr
     
  3. P Flados
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    P Flados Senior Member

    BP V does seem to be the boat/team with the most when it comes to all out ocean racing challenges.

    Two things keep coming to mind as I read of their exploits.

    In comparison to anything most of us have seen in person, their raw speeds just seem so over the top for any conditions they are in.

    The budget for their efforts must be just as impressive as their performance.
     
  4. bertho
    Joined: Aug 2006
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    bertho bertho

    on last video, 42 knt ... , just relax.. very impressive machine..
    cross the fingers for no whale having a nap on they bows...
    cheer's
    bertho
     
  5. Doug Lord
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    Doug Lord Flight Ready

    Bp V Jv

    From Scuttlebutt Europe today:

    Banque Populaire V Shatters the Record Time at the Cape Of Good Hope

    At 7:20 am (Paris time) this Sunday morning, after 11 days 21 hours 48 minutes and 18 seconds * since leaving Ushant, when the Maxi Banque Populaire V crossed the Cape of Good Hope, getting to the end of the second intermediate segment in the Jules Verne Trophy and at the same time shattering the time previously set. With already 8245 miles behind them, Loick Peyron and his men set a second record to their list of successes in a few days, and are now sailing in the Indian Ocean.

    After a tough start, a rapid descent to the Canaries, a slight slowdown in the Doldrums, an equator crossing made in record time, followed by a straight acceleration with a nice bypass to avoid the center of the St. Helena Highs, the Team Banque Populaire has just hit a new reference time.

    Sunday being a busy day at the Paris Boat Show, Loick Peyron took advantage of an extraordinary video conference to come back on the impression provided by this new accomplishment.

    Also reached earlier on, during his stand-by watch, Brian Thompson came back on these 12 incredible days of racing since leaving Ushant : "We are all really happy with our position and the time we have on the record. Everybody is in good shape and it is a very pleasant atmosphere on board. It's great to be sailing altogether ahead of Groupama's record. We have the perfect weather and Loick, Juan and Marcel, on the shore, have taken us on an excellent route, always in the wind, and on deck we have worked hard at sailing fast and safely. We have an excellent watch rhythm looking like choreography of people at every change! We have achieved 25% of the current record time, which maybe even more if we are quicker than 48 days! It is very exciting! "

    Now sailing in the Indian Ocean, the Maxi Banque Populaire V is now heading towards the Kerguelen Islands. Still benefiting from a westerly wind, the Maxi trimaran is faced with a difficult sea requiring the sailors to slow down a little bit. The instructions given by the skipper are clear: we do not exceed 30 knots.

    *Subject to approval and ratification by the WSSRC (World Sailing Speed Record Council).
    www.voile.banquepopulaire.fr

    Brian Thompson's blog: http://brianthompsonsailing.blogspot.com/2011/11/banque-populaire-v-to-depart-on-jules.html
     
  6. P Flados
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    P Flados Senior Member

    Kind of a shame.

    The boat can do so so much, but the compromise needed for light air speed (keep the boat weight to a minimum) makes the team oh so nervous in rough water.

    I understand and I would not assume that there is a better boat built and I certainly am not second guessing this cautious strategy (a record in the hand is worth an unlimited number of broken boats).

    However, this does show that there is certainly room for better boats someday. Increasing strength without losing speed in light winds sounds tough, but that is the name of this game.

    As long as the maxi tri is the platform of choice, it will mostly be "refinement". Possibly just increasing the scale (can you say mega $$$$$).

    Someday, there will be a bold departure that can take advantage of all of the wind without worries about the rough (hulls above the worst of the waves). However, it will be the ability to combine the rough capability with 2x true wind (or better) in light air that will be the true innovation that will change the game.
     
  7. Doug Lord
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    Doug Lord Flight Ready

    Bp V

    What I can't get over is that they are blasting thru the Southern Ocean/Indian Ocean at 30 knots and they sometimes can't see in front of them! Not only that: to the best of my knowledge they aren't using any kind of electronic device like Team Hydroptere was purportedly developing that could "see" growlers or containers just below the surface at distances that would allow the boat to miss them. Can you imagine what would happen if they hit something like Sanya did in the VOR??!! It's such a scary situation when we know the oceans are filled with more crap than ever before.
    I wish them luck and hope one of these great adventures doesn't end in a catastrophe......
     
  8. luff tension
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    luff tension Junior Member

    Looking at the damage on both sides of Sanya's hull I dont think it hit anything other than a lot of waves and was just seriously under built. While their repairs will keep the new bow section intact I really hope the rest of the structure is up to the job.
     
  9. P Flados
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    P Flados Senior Member

    For now,an item that is

    - really solid
    - large enough
    - mostly submerged

    is probably "end of attempt" at best, or "rescue required" at worst.

    Even in good visibility, 30 knots but rough seas does not really give a lot of avoidance time for the guy at the wheel. An emergency dodge can even result in "rescue required" without impact.

    Higher up for the guy at the wheel would help, but the layout just does not work real good. A lookout might help, but communication and response time would be a challenge.

    Sailing in the dark / bad visibility is just a betting game.
     
  10. cavalier mk2
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    cavalier mk2 Senior Member

    Sounds like mast cameras with infrared/low light features hooked into a monitor would help. They have the budget....
     
  11. oldsailor7
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    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    Any update. ??
     
  12. Doug Lord
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    Doug Lord Flight Ready

    No-you might check some of the links earlier in the thread......
     
  13. redreuben
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    redreuben redreuben

    They will be under WA by end of day, 2300 miles ahead of Groupama, boat speed 29 knots ! Freakin AWESOME !
     
  14. Corley
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    Corley epoxy coated

    Their current position on the tracker suggests they are close to passing Cape Leeuwin well to the South of the Australian continent currently doing 29 kts. Looking at the weather patterns they will probably stay well to the south of Tasmania as close to sea ice as possible for the shortest possible track. It's still looking like they will smash the record by a large margin.
     

  15. redreuben
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    Location: Beaconsfield Western Australia

    redreuben redreuben

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