BalTek / DuraKore for cabin floor

Discussion in 'Fiberglass and Composite Boat Building' started by RoyB, Jan 15, 2008.

  1. RoyB
    Joined: Oct 2005
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    RoyB Junior Member

    I will be replacing the cabin flooring in a 40 foot sailboat. The existing flooring is getting soft from moisture and abuse and the Teak and Holly veneer is trashed.

    I've been thinking about using BalTek / DuraKore for the job. I'd laminate either thin Teak/Holly veneer (if I can find it) or else a layer or two of carbon fiber on the upper surface.

    I have a some questions:

    1) Would I be better off using balsa or foam cored material?
    2) How do I best calculate the required thickness?
    3) If I surface with carbon fibre I'd like to clear coat it for appearance. Is there a good way to apply some non-skid to the exposed surface without destroying the appearance?
    4) Will epoxy work for the exposed surface or is it too soft and subject to marking if a winch handle or similar is dropped on it?
    5) In general (I know it's hard to give a specific answer) will a DuraKore+surface laminate panel be lighter than an equivalent plywood + teak/holly veneer panel?
    6) Is there another approach to the top surface that I haven't thought of that would be better than CF or veneer?

    Thanks in advance
     
  2. FAST FRED
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    FAST FRED Senior Member

    Is there a good way to apply some non-skid to the exposed surface without destroying the appearance?

    Gym , bowling alley or bar varnish are usually fine as non skid surface coating.

    Some Sherwin Williams epoxys are made for refinishing counter tops and are VERY hard , and if rolled on the slight pimples work as no nskid.

    FF
     
  3. Freenacin
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    Freenacin Junior Member

    You could use Duflex instead of durakore. It's already glassed both sides. Not cheap though. Epoxy doesn't like sunlight, don't know if that might be an issue.
     
  4. Kaptin-Jer
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    Kaptin-Jer Semi-Pro

    I'm doing the same thing in a 38' sailboat, but I will just be using 3/4" wood, either teak and holly veneer or solid wood laid together. The thickness in my boat is important and I am assuming it is in your boat also, so why would you feel that you need to go to a composite construction for a simple hatch/sole installation?
     
  5. RoyB
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    RoyB Junior Member

    It's a racing boat so weight is pretty important
     
  6. Kaptin-Jer
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    Kaptin-Jer Semi-Pro

    --makes sense now, mine is a cruiser.
     
  7. Freenacin
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    Freenacin Junior Member

    In that case Duflex. It's light, tough, and it comes with a textured surface (the glass weave).
     
  8. Alan M.
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    Alan M. Senior Member

    Have you done this job yet Roy? I recently learned that ATL have some Duflex seconds with a 16mm balsa core and 1600gsm glass on either side. .

    Sounds like useful flooring material - with that layup you'd need an axe to damage it!
     

  9. Steve W
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    Steve W Senior Member

    Make sure you do a REALISTIC weight study of whatever layup you are considering and compare them if weight is really important.I say this based on experience working on the Ron Holland designed Kialoa maxi back 1980 at Kiwi boats all panel goods used in the interior fitout were F-board which is an aluminum honeycomb with glass skins,the same stuff used in passenger jets,must be light eh.well the cabin sole was 3/4" F-board with 1/4" teak and holly ply laminated to the top then you routed out the core about 3/8" around all edges and backfilled with epoxy filler.Now the powers that be on the project thought that this was great because it was lighter than 3/4" plywood completly missing the fact that with the close spacing of the aluminum angle support system they could have used 1/2" or even 3/8"ply.Much cheaper and as light or lighter.There were many examples like this on the boats i saw at kiwi boats,Had to use high tech whether it made sense or not.That said,saving weight in the sole is not that important compared to saving less weight higher up.
    Steve.
     
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