Bad trade?

Discussion in 'Gas Engines' started by John h2, Jun 29, 2013.

  1. John h2
    Joined: Jun 2013
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    Location: Preist lake id

    John h2 New Member

    I traded into a 1987 19ft searay Seville 165 recently and am having nothing but problems. After fixing multiple shift cable and some control problems we finally got it on the water and it didn't go so well. Ran great and shifted well so through out some lines and tryed a little blueback fishin. After a short troll bout 15 20 minutes it started. Only been out for about 45 minutes when I saw the temp was up to 175 so shut it down to let her cool and rebait hooks ect. Try to start her back up and she didn't want to go. Notices radiator cap blowing some steam but over flow tank still full. Let cool some more and continued to try and fire her up but was hard starting and not running right. Got it going but would only take 1/3 to half throttle, and kept dying. Ended up getting a tow after some paddling. Got home checked oil to find water in oil. And coolant housing empty. Thought it was blown head gasket, but added water to do a compression test and now the water runs out exhaust port before it is filled up. Not sure which way to go now. Head gasket exhaust manifold? Not exactly a boat mechanic so just looking for some advice. Thanks John h2
     
  2. CDK
    Joined: Aug 2007
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    Location: Adriatic sea

    CDK retired engineer

    Looks like you bought yourself a lemon.
    You tell very little about the engine, but because you mentioned a filler cap and an expansion tank it probably is a 4.3 Merc with fresh water cooling. If water runs out the exhaust port, the heat exchanger is shot, with water in the oil there may also be a crack in the block or head, so prepare yourself for an engine transplant.
     
  3. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    I agree. A partial disassembly will let you know where the damage is.
     
  4. John h2
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    Location: Preist lake id

    John h2 New Member

    The motor is a straight 4 cylinder with a closed cooling system, a mercruiser 165. Planned on a partial tear down, but unsure where to start first. Think I'll start with the exhaust manifold and head. Thanks for the quick reply.
     
  5. John h2
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    Location: Preist lake id

    John h2 New Member

    165 4 cylinder with a alpha one outdrive
     
  6. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    They are notorious for leaks. The cast iron/aluminum interface tends to break gaskets because of the difference in expansion rates. The coolant passages behind the manifold are the most common place for leaks.
     
  7. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    This package is also very common and reliable, if well maintained. The first thing to do is get a repair manual on the drive/engine package, then go through the standard diagnostic procedures.

    [​IMG]
     
  8. CDK
    Joined: Aug 2007
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    Location: Adriatic sea

    CDK retired engineer

    Lifting the head with the manifold is useful to assess the extent of damage, but I'm sure no repair can be made without taking the engine out.
    A weak point in this big bore block is the thin wall between cylinders 2 and 3. Once the head gasket starts leaking there, a channel is burned in the cast iron there. If it is shallow it can be corrected by grinding the mating surface and installing a thicker gasket. One of my former employees who now owns an overhaul shop says an attempt to weld it can only be done during a complete overhaul with the whole block heated in an oven.
    Exchanging the block or the complete engine is cheaper.
     
  9. powerabout
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    powerabout Senior Member

    its an open deck block ( like most outboards)same mating surface on each cylinder as I remember
     
  10. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    He's got an inboard/outboard
     
  11. powerabout
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    powerabout Senior Member

    yes and the 470/170/485/165 has no deck ( open deck its called) its free standing cylinders like most outboards.

    Heres a pick of an outboard that has an open deck the 470 looks like this when you take the head off
     

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  12. powerabout
    Joined: Nov 2007
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    Location: Melbourne/Singapore/Italy

    powerabout Senior Member

    The coolant reservoir is integral with the exhaust manifold, take the housing off where the radiator cap is and check there first as that the simplest thing to do.
    Drain the manifold first.
    The engines were shipped full of coolant so the inside should be as shiny as the day it was made unless someone filled it up with plain water
     

  13. John h2
    Joined: Jun 2013
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    Location: Preist lake id

    John h2 New Member

    Turned out to be blown head gasket so far still need to test the exhaust manifold. But initial check of block seems good, no cracks. Thanks again for all the feed back.
     

    Attached Files:

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