Bad Spot in Stringer

Discussion in 'All Things Boats & Boating' started by Dfrenzy, Jun 1, 2008.

  1. Dfrenzy
    Joined: Mar 2007
    Posts: 6
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: ohio

    Dfrenzy Junior Member

    I have a Bad spot maybe a foot and a half in my stringer. I know i should cut the top off and dig out all the rot untill i get to clean dry wood. But i don't want to do this again so what are my options. Can i use a two part 16 or 20 lb density close cell foam to fill the place of the old wood or should i just use wood or what? I'm open for any and all options.
     
  2. masalai
    Joined: Oct 2007
    Posts: 6,823
    Likes: 120, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 1882
    Location: cruising, Australia

    masalai masalai

    Keep it for when you need to have a "Viking Funeral"?
     
  3. safewalrus
    Joined: Feb 2005
    Posts: 4,742
    Likes: 78, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 659
    Location: Cornwall, England

    safewalrus Ancient Marriner

    Sounds quite painful, I think you can get pils for that (several gallons should deaden the pain!)
     
  4. the1much
    Joined: Jul 2007
    Posts: 3,897
    Likes: 44, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 696
    Location: maine

    the1much hippie dreams

    go here,,,and all questions should already be answered,,,,,,,but,,,,,,rip out the stringer,,replace with new 1,,,i cant imagine you can see ALL the problems,,,,,,,,then before ya do that,,,,find out WHY you have this problem now,,,,fix THAT first,,then ya stringer.
    http://www.boatdesign.net/forums/showthread.php?t=22182
     
  5. Knut Sand
    Joined: Apr 2003
    Posts: 471
    Likes: 30, Points: 28, Legacy Rep: 451
    Location: Kristiansand, Norway

    Knut Sand Senior Member

    Yo do not say anything about boat type.

    If stringer is the same as "spant" in Norwegian, (believe so).
    Cut away rotten wood, its probably broken, grind away the rivets, heads of the klinkers (? but carefully) in that area and get it out (preferably as whole as possible, it makes it easier to make a replacement stringer). Normally you'll get more movement in the hull fore and aft of this weak point, this again can cause damages to these stringers. For the same reason, you should replace the broken/ rotten stringer with some material with preferably the same flexibility as the original, this will spread the movements in the hull over a larger area. Reducing high stressed areas..

    A replacement stringer can be made out of thin laminated wood, with similar curve. Riveting is another issue, probably the biggest problem is to get hold of rivets (here in Norway, we're loosing the stores with all these small wooden boxes, all the knowlegde, i think. Left is bigger shops with mainly stupid ( but accasionally I'm in luck!) personel, but more of everything and no spares... no spares at all.... But to rivet you'll need help, one on the inside and one on the outside.
     
  6. DanishBagger
    Joined: Feb 2006
    Posts: 1,540
    Likes: 46, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 523
    Location: Denmark

    DanishBagger Never Again

    I believe a spant in norwegian (and danish, as it were) is what the english folks are calling frames. I believe the stringers are the ones attached to the frames, and then the hull-shell comes next.

    However, in this case, I think they're actually refering to what you and I call spant, i.e. frames.

    On the other hand, in a GRP-boat, I'd propably call all the reinforments "stringers" in english.
    Yay, I need to go look through auld books now. Thanks a bunch, knut!!

    :)
     
  7. the1much
    Joined: Jul 2007
    Posts: 3,897
    Likes: 44, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 696
    Location: maine

    the1much hippie dreams

    man you foreigners confuse me ,,hehe ;)
     
  8. DanishBagger
    Joined: Feb 2006
    Posts: 1,540
    Likes: 46, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 523
    Location: Denmark

    DanishBagger Never Again

    Trust me, you're not as confused as we are. ;)
     
  9. Dfrenzy
    Joined: Mar 2007
    Posts: 6
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: ohio

    Dfrenzy Junior Member

    The boat is a Penn Yan. They have drain holes in the stringers to allow the water to drain down to the bilge area. But the drain holes were either cut after production and never sealed or something of that nature but the boat is only 8 years old. I can stick my finger into the wood. I'm not a happy camper on this one but what else can you do other than fix the problem and move on.
     
  10. Knut Sand
    Joined: Apr 2003
    Posts: 471
    Likes: 30, Points: 28, Legacy Rep: 451
    Location: Kristiansand, Norway

    Knut Sand Senior Member

    Did a search on the net; "Penn Yan"

    They're built also with "bands" as we call it in Norway, A thin flexible "frame" set rather close together, usually oak, instead of the more solid frames. Seen that on older lifeboats. Stringers (if I understand it correctly) would go fore to aft, also keeping some water in place, on top.

    Pictures would be nice...

    Danish; thanks for the info, quite irritating when a word suddenly jumps out of the brain like that....

    So next, to learn something today; What's the word for "bands" in English?
     
  11. the1much
    Joined: Jul 2007
    Posts: 3,897
    Likes: 44, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 696
    Location: maine

    the1much hippie dreams

    ya? ,,,hehe ;)
     
  12. DanishBagger
    Joined: Feb 2006
    Posts: 1,540
    Likes: 46, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 523
    Location: Denmark

    DanishBagger Never Again

    Hah, yeah, I hate that too. Band would be what we call bånd, and as far as as can tell, those are called ribs in english. So, in english, we have frames, stringers, ribs, and then the shell. Does that sound somewhat correct?

    In the picture attached, they first set up the frames (spant), then on the outside of that, set up the stringers going fore and aft, and if we were to put bånd/band/ribs on those, they would go on perpendicular to the fore-and-aft stringers. I think that would be the correct translation for us, anyway.
     

    Attached Files:

  13. the1much
    Joined: Jul 2007
    Posts: 3,897
    Likes: 44, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 696
    Location: maine

    the1much hippie dreams

    thanks DB,,,i think i actually understand that,,hehe ;)
     
  14. DanishBagger
    Joined: Feb 2006
    Posts: 1,540
    Likes: 46, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 523
    Location: Denmark

    DanishBagger Never Again

    You're welcome. That saves us a whole lot of trouble, because we now don't need the english, we can just speak norwegian or danish to you? :D

    Pyha, det var sgu en lettelse!




    (Phew!, that's a (bloody) relief!)
    ;)
     

  15. Knut Sand
    Joined: Apr 2003
    Posts: 471
    Likes: 30, Points: 28, Legacy Rep: 451
    Location: Kristiansand, Norway

    Knut Sand Senior Member

    All these people and no real language....

    Sounds pretty correct to me, I've seen frames and ribs used like 3-4 ribs one frame, side by side, and continuing like that. Stingers on the inside, as a support for deck plates (to you who want to learn a real language: "tilje" plural: "tiljer").

    Btw; Dfrenzy; you don't have to go for a viking funeral, it sounded like a repair is quite possible. If I have understood this correctly, I would remove bad wood, as mentioned above, taper the ends with a grinder, make a piece of wood, with the same dimentions as the missing wood (taper the ends 1:8, ok heres probably somone coming up with other ratios, like "no way! taper 1:6 is good enough" or "I never taper less than 1:10"), make it a snug fit, glue the ends to the remaining stringer with epoxy, Drill holes, add rivets and klinks.
     
Loading...
Similar Threads
  1. Angélique
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    515
  2. Rurudyne
    Replies:
    10
    Views:
    1,781
  3. lewisboats
    Replies:
    11
    Views:
    1,596
  4. lewisboats
    Replies:
    4
    Views:
    981
  5. Wynand N
    Replies:
    15
    Views:
    5,562
  6. dskira
    Replies:
    27
    Views:
    7,480
  7. Manie B
    Replies:
    38
    Views:
    8,244
  8. Jimbo1490
    Replies:
    76
    Views:
    7,947
  9. brian eiland
    Replies:
    14
    Views:
    1,026
  10. ImaginaryNumber
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    983
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.