Awlgrip or Sterling ?

Discussion in 'Powerboats' started by grady, Oct 27, 2006.

  1. Jimbo1490
    Joined: Jun 2005
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    Location: Orlando, FL

    Jimbo1490 Senior Member

    Upon re-reading your post which described the paint process used on your boat, I noticed that you said that the painters put a white primer over the yellow/green bare metal primer. What was the purpose of this primer? Typically white primers are used to fair or surface a substrate to improve the surface texture to make it smoother and free of defects. But these primers are always allowed to cure fully then sanded prior to application of the topcoat. Additionally, if the highest level of adhesion is a goal, the bare metal break through areas should be re-etched/Alodined and the entire substrate including the sanded primer/surfacer should be re-primed with the bare metal primer. The polyurethane topcoat paints actually do not have outstanding adhesion on their own. Epoxy resins stick like crazy, and epoxy primers have epoxy resin in them. So a thin coat of epoxy primer over the surface both seals the rather porous surface of the sanded white primer and promotes adhesion between this surfacer and topcoat. Sterling's white primer is a polyurethane product, BTW.

    Jimbo
     
  2. grady
    Joined: Oct 2006
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    Location: Scituate, Ma

    grady Novice

    So it looks like it going to be awlgrip's paint with someone else's reducer. Thanks for the info.
    The other thing, I've been mulling over was that my first choice was on the dark side of the spectrum, but I've been hearing bad things about hull temps and print through.
    I was planning to remove all the deck hardware including cleats, lights, winshield etc.. but what about the rub rail. I think it is still available from the manufacturer. ( the old one is showing it's age.) But I also know that the rail cover's a critical joint. Any thoughts?
     
  3. grady
    Joined: Oct 2006
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    Location: Scituate, Ma

    grady Novice

    Hey guy's. Thanks for all the wonderful feedback. There are a few questions left unanswered. Like is all the hype about dark colors really worth considering, you know the increased hull temps? the higher temps causing the hull mat to print thru the gel on even decades old boats.
    The other dimention to this rebuild is my repower. I am going with a 320hp
    volvo-penta GXI with a new duo-prop stern drive all new controls, gauges,wire harness and freshwater cooling. But I'm not sure about the condition of the transom It seems sound. no dead sounding spots although when I had to move a trim tab screw there was signs of water intrusion at that level.
     
  4. Jimbo1490
    Joined: Jun 2005
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    Location: Orlando, FL

    Jimbo1490 Senior Member

    Blacks and navy blues can max out at around 160*F in the summer. The whites and light pastels will be around 125* F which is substantially cooler. This can increase print through. You will find that the surface will have more print through while it is hot but later in the day after it cools the print through may disappear only to re-appear the next day when it gets hot again. The interior of the boat will be hotter too.

    Jimbo
     

  5. grady
    Joined: Oct 2006
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    Location: Scituate, Ma

    grady Novice

    Thanks Jimbo, You have been a wealth of information. I really am diving in head first and want to do a first rate job. ( Prep, prep then prep again). It looks like the rub rail is still available from the manufacturer, so that will coming off. I figure the less taping the better. I'm also considering removing the windsheild, not only to make the refinish easier, but to have it reconditioned as well.

    Grady
     
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