Australian Recreational Craft Scantling Standard?

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by CADProjects, Oct 7, 2017.

  1. CADProjects
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    CADProjects Marine Design Services

    Question regarding what if any scantling standards are required for recreational craft in Australia.

    Im involved in the design & engineering of commercial vessels and are familiar with the usual scantling requirements the relevant regulatory standards outline such as ISO, Lloyds, BV ect.... but im often left puzzled when I look at the construction of any modern aluminium recreational vessels i see operating every weekend.
    Even if I cherry picked the available standards worked them to the bare minimum i dont think I could come up with a vessel that is as light as all the usual recreational vessels offered in the Australian market. Examples such as Quintrex Boats, Savage Boats, Horizion Boats, Sea jay Boats ect....

    This leads me to assume there is no structural scantling standard required for recreational boats in Australia....?

    Can anyone out there in the recreational / production boat design scene shed some light on this question...?

    Thanks
    Dax
     
    Last edited: Oct 7, 2017
  2. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    I'd suggest you look at the matter of "Australian Standards" which sets standards for manufactured items in Australia, the exact legal status of that, I am not sure of. Certainly goods can be found on the market, imported, that don't meet the Australian standards for that item.What I can say, is that generally the structure of recreational small craft in Aluminium is much improved on past practices, the skin thicknesses, e.g., as one indicator, would probably be 50% greater than a generation ago. Heavily dished alloy boat bottoms were once commonplace.
     
  3. CADProjects
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    Thanks Mr Efficiency,
    Agreed boat construction has improved over the last generation.

    I have spent many hours searching on the net regarding Australian standards and all i get is information on commercial vessels. I have posed the question to my commercial surveyor colleges and none have an answer other than they think they should have to meet some standard but cant finger one nor shed any light on why the locally manufactured aluminium boats dont appear visually at least to meet any commercially available standard.
    Perhaps there is some recreational standard that im not aware of.......
    Hopefully someone in the design office of one of the Australian boat manufacturers will see this post & comment.
     
  4. Mr Efficiency
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  5. TANSL
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    TANSL Senior Member

    In general, countries as such do not have their own rules for ship scantling. Their regulations usually refer to the calculation of the scantlings according to any of the international Classification Societies. Some country can refer to the rules of some local CS, if it exists.
    In Europe, in order to achieve CE marking, ships scantlings must be calculated according to ISO 12215. This standard contains specific guidelines for aluminum vessels, including welding. This standard covers a void that existed for boats under 24 m in length and is being increasingly accepted by designers. Some administrations have accepted it as standard for recreational craft.
     
  6. CADProjects
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    Thanks Tansl,
    Im familiar with ISO12215, I use that standard to design most of the smaller (8m or less) vessels that come across my desk as I find it allows for a lighter structure relative to some of the other usual standards such as Lloyds SSC.
    It is this familiarity with ISO 12215 that facilitates my observation the recreational vessels buzzing about our waterways here in Australia dont meet the minimum criteria outlined in 12225. Im referring to the sub 8m aluminium trailer boats that are very popular here.
     
  7. CADProjects
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    Thanks Mr Efficiency, I have previously read through those standards.
    They cover many topics such as stability, reserve buoyancy, loading, powering, drainage & navigation but interestingly nothing specific to scantlings that I could find.
    It will be interesting to see what other comments come in from the industry as this post vets more views.
     
  8. TANSL
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    TANSL Senior Member

    Yes I agree. Although it is not possible to generalize because there are many variants involved, my perception is that, in a boat of about 15 m in length, the structure according to ISO can result in around 6% lighter than according to the rules of the Lloyd's SSC
     
  9. Ike
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    Ike Senior Member

    Like you, I have done many thorough searches for Australian standards on recreational boats so I could include them on the links page of my web suite. Frankly there are very few requirements to qualify for an Australia Builders Plate. (ABP) It is my understanding from talking to knowledgeable people that many boat manufacturers in Australia follow either ABYC or ISO standards, but are not required to do so. Here is a link to a site that has some information on it. Near the bottom of the page are links to further information. But from what I have been able to find out, this web site is about as good as it gets for info on Australian standards. ANZSBEG :: Australian Builders Plate http://www.anzsbeg.com.au/index.php/boating-safely/australian-builders-plate/
     
  10. CADProjects
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    Hi Ike,
    Im glad to see someone else has come to the same conclusion as me regarding scantling standards (or lack thereof) for recreational vessels in Australia.
    So this would mean that manufacturers are self regulating their adherence to internationally recognised structural standards.......... what could go wrong....
    It seams crazy that all commercial vessels in Australia have to adhere to an internationally recognised structural standard but for the recreational world there is no requirement whatsoever.
     
  11. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    If they are being used to ply for hire, then I assume they need to meet "survey" requirements as laid out by state regulations, you might talk to the relevant department in each state to find out what scantling standards are needed to pass survey. For private use small craft, I have never heard of any minimum scantling rules being touted. As for things "going wrong", the best insurance would probably be compulsory flotation, and that too is not mandated, although a few include it.
     
  12. CADProjects
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    Sure if the vessel is to be used as a hire boat then it wall fall under the "commercial " umbrella and would be required to meet survey requirements & adhere to all the usual and well defined standards associated with commercial vessels.
    My question surrounds the scantling standards with recreational vessels alone.
     
  13. Mr Efficiency
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    Have you spoken to the BIA ? They represent the builders, so if they don't know, it must be a secret ! :eek:
     
  14. CADProjects
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    Hi Mr Efficiency, thanks for your suggestion.
    I have just spoken to the BIA main office now (ph+61 2 9438 2077). Their response is there is no structural scantling standard applicable to recreational vessels operating in Australia.
    Very interesting.
     

  15. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Well, there you go. I don't think badly designed and /or built small boats are as common as they were, though. Such a competitive business tends to weed out the shonks.
     
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