Atkins - compared to modern design/materials

Discussion in 'Powerboats' started by Standpipe, Feb 26, 2015.

  1. Easy Rider
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    Easy Rider Senior Member

    If built light out of plywood she'd probably actually cruise at 15mph on OB power but her motion probably wouldn't be very pleasant .. not going to guess about safe.

    Tang's lines look a lot like Handy Billy. We're Billy A and W Hand friends?
     
  2. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Just about any boat that size, at that speed, (mid-teens mph) is going to have a high angle of trim, unless it is built super-light, and then won't sit on its design waterline anyway. That may not be the end of the world, running nose high might be drier, and with the heavily-veed forward sections still a good cut-water.
     
  3. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    I eluded to this in a previous post, most boats need to run on or around their designed weight or they're too far off their lines, even if balance and centers has been kept close to the original. Lets say you have a 22', two ton powerboat with modest, variable deadrise, a typical warped bottom and you've "engineering" it down to 1.5 tons, yet kept it strong and stiff. Well in this trim she'll have more speed potential because of the lighter weight and decreased wetted surface, but also be cause of these two things she likely "dry 'er chines" at a lower top speed, because the lighter hull will rise up and dust off the transom chines at speed. This can be a very dangerous thing and why it's wise to have a pro look over what you have in mind, so the boat doesn't do something nasty at 60 MPH, like swap ends.
     
  4. Easy Rider
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    Easy Rider Senior Member

    Sixty mph in an Atkins design?

    What a thought.
     
  5. Wckoek
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    Wckoek Junior Member

    Atkins have such a wide scope of design, say if one wanted to study their designs, which are the more refined of their characteristic designs?
    Say like their double ended, seabright, or 5 of their best designs available on the list for sale.
     

  6. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    This is quite an old thread, but an answer your your questions are simply impossible, given the volume of work of John and his father. I'm the owner of the last design John was commissioned to draw up, so it might be the most refined of the box keel designs, though knowing what I do about it and them, it's not. What it is, was a "safe" way to go for this commission's SOR, which was to a long time patron and friend. He and his friend put many miles under her keel and it was one of his favorites. Billy started the box keel research and developed it up quite a bit, to which John followed, furthering the type. They played with the SeaBrites a fair bit too. John has some designs for plywood (develop surfaces), but Billy didn't as far as I know.

    Unfortunately, all most of these designs don't benefit modern thinking, nor material selections. They tend to be heavy, though comfortable and some surprisingly efficient like my 37' double ender. As a case study, you could select from several types from this father and son team, as to which you might want to do this with, well you'd be the best decision maker in this regard, as we don't know what you're looking for. You might want to contact Pat Atkins, John's widow. I'm pretty sure she's still alive, though I haven't seen her since Mystic in 2011
     
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