Asymmetrical cat / tacking proa / stabilized mono with one outrigger

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by DennisRB, Aug 25, 2016.

  1. DennisRB
    Joined: Sep 2004
    Posts: 1,268
    Likes: 26, Points: 48, Legacy Rep: 228
    Location: Brisbane

    DennisRB Senior Member

    Can anyone provide some more info on modern versions of these types of craft in various sizes? I heard there was a popular power cat with one engine in one hull and the hulls were different displacements to compensate. The boat looked fairly conventional... I think I found it here.

    http://aspenpowercatamarans.com/innovation/

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    Then there is Bernd Kohlers cataproa, which seems to have one hull with more displacement than the other with the bigger hull containing the accommodations.

    https://bernd2014.com/2016/05/14/cataproa-2/

    [​IMG]

    Then we have the more extreme forms such as regular outriggers, which are more like a stabilized monohull with only one outrigger, such as a these racing canoes, and even a superyacht was built this way.

    [​IMG]

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    There are plenty of threads about stabilized monohull powerboats in the trimaran form, but there are complaints about handling in a seaway with "snap roll" and other practical limitations such as docking.

    [​IMG]

    How might a similar main hull to above with the same overall beam but just one float handle? I guess the snap roll will be much less, and you could actually come alongside one one side of the boat. The outboard would be mounted on the beam close to the main hull instead of the stern. That way its thrust would be somewhat divided to both hulls to eliminate the tendency to pull toward the float, plus it would get weight out of the stern, also you only need to build one float and the area between the main hull and float may become more usable.

    Seems to me this style could result in a longer boat than a regular cat for a given amount of materials and build time, for comfort in a seaway and better DLR. Is the asymmetrical nature of this a main detraction due to being "odd"? Obviously stability would suffer in one direction, which may or may not matter depending on the SOR. Or are there more serious concerns for the type?
     
  2. DennisRB
    Joined: Sep 2004
    Posts: 1,268
    Likes: 26, Points: 48, Legacy Rep: 228
    Location: Brisbane

    DennisRB Senior Member

  3. DennisRB
    Joined: Sep 2004
    Posts: 1,268
    Likes: 26, Points: 48, Legacy Rep: 228
    Location: Brisbane

    DennisRB Senior Member

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