around in pocket, I I think so

Discussion in 'Projects & Proposals' started by WindRaf, Oct 2, 2014.

  1. WindRaf
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    WindRaf Senior Member

  2. WindRaf
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    WindRaf Senior Member

    About pocket I think so:

    1) A boat in the storm sea is a mass inserted in an energy system; plus the mass is small more should be marine.
    Fortunately, many generations have sailed before us and they should be referred to as the geometry of a boat that holds up well to the sea. No need to invent new outlandish theories.

    2) Modern materials allow us to build boats lighter and stronger, but a small boat designed for long voyages will always be a heavy boat, if you want to put on board a human skipper, and quench and nourish.

    3) I do not believe that a human solo can live in good health for many months only eating cold sardines and muesly, and even if it were possible I think it would flip in the third month.
    Cooking on board, though sparingly, I think is as fundamental as the watertight integrity of the hull.

    4) Slocum and Dumas had no source of electricity on board, but around the world have done the same. Then it is better to leave behind the batteries and load the oil stove.
     
  3. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    Small and heavy makes it slow. In turn that means that more supplies need to be carried, which weigh more; making the boat even heavier and slower. Generations that sailed before us, for example New England's fishing fleet, had a 10% loss per year. Few people are willing to accept those odds nowadays. Slocum was a professional that could survive with very little. As for Dumas, he was an athlete with incredible endurance and his diet was not much better than the one you criticize.
     
  4. WindRaf
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    WindRaf Senior Member

    Gonzo,
    what you write is correct.
    And, as regards the design of a boat of this type exist other consideration linked to the small and very heavy: its speed is very low, so for example the appendices drifts and rudders narrow and deep, which can only work at high speeds, are totally ineffective. No one 'wing of aircraft' can be efficient at 2 knots, indeed stalled and will make chaotic the behavior of the boat.
     
  5. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    10% ? Hell, that equates to about a 35% chance of lasting ten years. Certainly sends the life insurance premiums up. :eek:
     
  6. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    Life of sailors was cheap. They were literally expendable.
     
  7. Steve W
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    Steve W Senior Member

    I have never understood the reason why people would desire to cover long distances in silly little boats other than some type of ego trip, ie, a desire to become famous. I mean, if you want to circumnavigate on the cheap there are thousands of perfectly sensible pocket cruisers available for peanuts in the 20-30ft range that, while not exactly comfortable can complete a perfectly workmanlike voyage with only moderate upgrades.

    Steve.
     
  8. WindRaf
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    WindRaf Senior Member

    Steve,
    perhaps because someone else might say:
    what sense does it go around the world with a boat of 30 feet, at a cost less, if you can do the same with an airplane with a hostess who serves you coffee?
     
  9. Steve W
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    Steve W Senior Member

    Actually, it would be very easy to have a very capable boat in the 20 to 30ft range ready to go for 10k. If the purpose of the trip was to visit a lot of exotic, sometimes quite off the beaten path places over the course of maybe 2 years you could not even come close by flying commercial jets.
    Im curious, what would be the reason to circle in a tiny boat vs something more sensible?
     
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  10. WindRaf
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    WindRaf Senior Member

    Steve,
    I can not understand what you mean.
    Boats 20 ft long like the one you mention have already done many times around in all sorts of ways.
    Last year an Italian has toured non-stop solo in the course of fifty roaring with a 22 ft.
    If he had reasoned with the standard of 30 ft this endeavor would never have even been conceived.
    The challenge now is to go below this target.
     
  11. WindRaf
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    WindRaf Senior Member

  12. Steve W
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    Steve W Senior Member

    My point exactly, i mentioned the 20 to 30ft range simply because there are plenty of boats available in this size range that can be had cheap that could, without excessive modification, perform a reasonably safe, workmanlike voyage around the globe without sponsors or fanfare. To want to do it in, say, a 10ft boat would be a stunt, more of an ego trip than a sailing trip, you would be doing it for reasons i don't understand i guess as im not a person who seeks attention.
    When John Guzzwell sailed the little 20ft Trekka around the world in the 1950s it was in no way an attention seeking stunt, but it proved without a shadow of doubt that small light displacement boats were quite capable of such a trip. The guy who circumnavigated in the Mini was doing it in a very well proven type. I saw a 12ft boat in New Zealand 40 years ago that had sailed out from the UK and was attempting a circumnavigation, and then he encountered the Tasman sea and was never seen again. If attention seeking is the goal why not do it in a boat so short you have to do the trip standing up, now that would be a feat.

    Steve.
     
  13. WindRaf
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    WindRaf Senior Member

    Steve,
    the reasons for which are made great voyages are different and do not depend on the size of the boat.
    Some do it for 'ego by exposure' as you call it, others without sponsors and media uproar. Then there are also those who make a lot of mess media and never start, or they pretend to leave and they invent difficulties that they never had. There are also Donald Crowhurst in all ways.
    The world is full of media-heroes, silent-heroes, and heroes fake.
    Independent of the size of the boat.
     
  14. Steve W
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    Steve W Senior Member

    Yep, but there are few, if any, that attempt these voyages in tiny boats that are not media whores but plenty who silently go about their business in regular smaller boats.

    Steve.
     

  15. WindRaf
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    WindRaf Senior Member

    However, the charm of the pocket cruiser for long trips is that there is still much to design, test, and try.
    A challenge to design and daring.
     
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