Aqua Lark

Discussion in 'Powerboats' started by Steve5140, May 14, 2011.

  1. Steve5140
    Joined: Jun 2006
    Posts: 6
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Illinois

    Steve5140 Junior Member

    A couple of years ago I posted to find info on an Aqua Lark I purchased. There has been little information on it so I decided to try again. The strange thing about this boat is the shape it is in. It is all original and never been in the water. The lettering is all hand painted and there are pencil marks on some items showing drill holes. There seems to be a lot of information on standard Aqua Larks that look like small speed boast but this one you ride on top of like a wave runner. I have posted some pics and hope someone has info on this boat or a way I can research the hull number to find out its age. Not sure why it was never used but may have been a salesmens sample.

    2011-05-14_12-56-12_663.jpg

    2011-05-14_12-56-38_894.jpg
     
  2. mack505
    Joined: Jul 2010
    Posts: 5
    Likes: 0, Points: 1, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: VA/DC/NC

    mack505 Junior Member

    Hi Steve, that doesn't look like most of the other Aqua Larks I've seen.

    Check this thread in another forum: http://my350z.com/forum/the-lounge-off-topic/408197-aqua-lark-boats.html

    Its the longest I've found so far.

     
  3. mack505
    Joined: Jul 2010
    Posts: 5
    Likes: 0, Points: 1, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: VA/DC/NC

    mack505 Junior Member

  4. Steve5140
    Joined: Jun 2006
    Posts: 6
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Illinois

    Steve5140 Junior Member

    I read through those forums and there is some info on Aqua Larks but not much about this style. One poster said they made several types and that this might be a O style. I'm still wondering about the hand lettering and pencil marks. Where these boats built one at a time and if so how many are out there (this style not the open version) Its taking all my will power not to put a motor on it and go but considering that it at least 40 years old, never been in the water and in brand new condition. It has to have some value. With the power of the internet it suprises me at the little amount of info out there and there is not a picture of one of these anywhere. Hope someone can help.
     
  5. mack505
    Joined: Jul 2010
    Posts: 5
    Likes: 0, Points: 1, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: VA/DC/NC

    mack505 Junior Member

    Yeah, I have never seen that one. I know the others you see, and like the one I have, are made from molds, and sandwich together. I did see someone out of Chicago area selling the actual molds some time back. I wonder if yours is one of a kind.
     
  6. chelsene
    Joined: May 2011
    Posts: 3
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Nisswa, MN

    chelsene New Member

    There are at least two of those boats around

    Hi Steve, we have one of that same model sitting in our showroom at DH docks in MN. I have been to the end of the internet and found no information on them. The one we have was made in Canada, and possibly a 1960???
     
  7. Steve5140
    Joined: Jun 2006
    Posts: 6
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Illinois

    Steve5140 Junior Member

    Thanks for the reply. I have enclosed some more pics. One is the canadian hull plate showing no limits hp or wiegth. The other is a uscg sticker showing 7.5 hp and 230 lb.

    I also included a pic of the transom fin showing a pencil lines for the holes leading me to believe these were hand made.

    Like I said earlier mine has never been used so I think I will leave it that way for a while until I learn more about it.
     

    Attached Files:

  8. chelsene
    Joined: May 2011
    Posts: 3
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Nisswa, MN

    chelsene New Member

    I looked into these a few years ago and it seems to me they made the more common two seaters near Chicago up until the mid to late 1990's. I think the newer ones were a larger version. We have a single like the one you have and a two seater in an inboard configuration, they both seem to be from around the same year.
     
  9. Ike
    Joined: Apr 2006
    Posts: 2,214
    Likes: 170, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 1669
    Location: Washington

    Ike Senior Member

    Here is the data on TAMCO LTD from the USCG Manufacturers Database


    MIC: ZAM Status: In Business
    Company: TAMCO LTD Company Official:
    Parent Company: Parent MIC:
    Address: 995 LAURIER DR BOX 5070 City: WINDSOR 40
    State: ON Zip:
    Country: CANADA Phone: 0000000000
    Fax: In Business: Wednesday, January 01, 1975
    Out of Business: Date Modified: Monday, October 03, 1994
    Type: Outboards, Open Motorboats, Jon Boats


    Additional Address:
    Comments: PMR:111984 PO BOX 5070 BSC 73 RETD 920218. IN BUSINESS PER CANADIAN CG MIC LIST 940411.

    Since I was probably the one who made this entry I'll try to interpret
    Under comments: in Oct 19, 1984 they had a PO Box address, but mail was returned, .they had moved to the address above.
    The Canadian Coast Guard reported them as in business on Oct 3, 1994, but they must have gone out of business very shortly there after

    We had a lot of problems getting good data on Canadian Manufacturers.

    Now if you search the data base (all fields) for the words Aqua Lark, this comes up.

    MIC: HUP Status: Out of Business
    Company: HUNT PRODUCTS LTD Company Official: BERNARD CALZA
    Parent Company: HUNT PRODUCTS LTD Parent MIC:
    Address: 16233 WAUSAU City: S HOLLAND
    State: IL Zip: 60473
    Country: Phone: 7083397755
    Fax: In Business: Wednesday, May 17, 1978
    Out of Business: Tuesday, April 15, 1997 Date Modified: Tuesday, April 15, 1997
    Type: Outboards, Open Motorboats, Jon Boats
    Thrillcraft, jet boats, skiboats

    Additional Address:
    Comments: OUT BUS 8/81 BACK IN BUS 2/84 SEVERNA PARK, MD 21146, TYPE12. 970415 OOB PER CG-5093.
     
  10. Ike
    Joined: Apr 2006
    Posts: 2,214
    Likes: 170, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 1669
    Location: Washington

    Ike Senior Member

    Also, I read through some of the threads linked here. A lot of people talk about putting outboards on these that are over 40 HP. I certainly would not do that. The standard for little boats like these limits them to a maximum of 40 HP, and then only if they can successfully pass a test with that HP. If not they have to go with a lower HP that allows them to go through the test course.

    Here's the USCG reg for boats of this type:

    (b) For boats qualifying under this paragraph, the performance test method described in this paragraph may be used to determine the horsepower capacity.

    (1) Qualifying criteria.

    (i) Thirteen feet or less in length;

    (ii) Remote wheel steering;

    (iii) Transom height (A) Minimum 19 inch transom height; or, (B) For boats with at least a 19 inch motorwell height, a minimum 15 inch transom height;

    (iv) Maximum persons capacity not over two persons;

    (2) Boat preparation.

    (i) The boat must be rigged with equipment recommended or provided by the boat and motor manufacturer and tested with the highest horsepower production powerplant for which the boat is to be rated, not to exceed 40 horsepower.

    (ii) Standard equipment must be installed in accordance with manufacturers' instructions.

    (iii) The lowest ratio (quickest) steering system offered on the boat model being tested must be installed.

    (iv) The outboard motor must be fitted with the manufacturer's recommended propeller providing maximum speed.

    (v) Standard permanently installed fuel tanks must be no more than one-half full. Boats without permanent tanks must be tested with one full portable tank.

    (vi) Portable tanks must be in their designated location or placed as far aft as possible.

    (vii) The outboard motor must be placed in the lowest vertical position on the transom or, if mounting instructions are provided with the boat, at the height recommended.

    (viii) Boat bottom, motor and propeller must be in new or almost new condition.

    Note: The use of the following special equipment should be considered because of the potential for exceeding

    the capabilities of the boat while performing the test:

    Racing Type Personal Flotation Device

    Helmet.

    (3) Test conditions. Testing must be conducted on smooth, calm water with the wind speed below 10 knots. The test must be conducted with no load other than a driver who must weigh no more than 200 pounds. The motor trim angle must be adjusted to provide maximum full throttle speed short of excessive porpoising or propeller ventilation or ``cavitation'', so that there is no loss of directional control.

    (4) Quick turn test procedure. Set throttle at a low maneuvering speed and steer the boat straight ahead. Turn the steering wheel 180 deg. in the direction of least resistance in ½ second or less and hold it at that position without changing the throttle or trim settings during or after the wheel change. The boat completes the maneuver successfully if it is capable of completing a 90 deg. turn without the driver losing control of the boat or reducing the throttle setting. Gradually increase the boat's turn entry speed incrementally until the boat does not complete the Quick Turn Test successfully or successfully completes it at maximum throttle. Note: It is recognized that operator skill and familiarity with a particular boat and motor combination will affect the test results. It is permissible to make a number of practice runs through the quick turn test at any throttle setting.

    (5) Test course method. Set throttle for 30 miles per hour boat speed and run the test course set up in accordance with Figure 183.53, passing outside the designated avoidance marker for 35 to 37.5 miles per hour without contacting any of the course markers. If the boat successfully completes this run of the test course, increase the throttle setting to 35 to 37.5 miles per hour boat speed and run the course passing outside the designated avoidance marker for that speed without contacting any of the course markers. If the boat successfully completes this run of the test course and the motor was not at full throttle, increase the throttle setting to 37.5 to 42.5 miles per hour boat speed and run the course passing outside the designated avoidance marker for that speed without contacting any of the course markers. If the boat successfully completes this run of the test course and the motor was not at full throttle, increase the throttle setting to 42.5 miles per hour or more and run the course passing outside the designated avoidance marker for that speed without contacting any of the course markers. If the boat successfully completes this run of the test course and the motor was not at full throttle, continue to increase the throttle setting and run the test course passing outside the designated avoidance marker for 42.5 miles per hour or more until the boat fails to complete the test successfully or the boat completes the test course maneuvers successfully at full throttle. The boat successfully completes the test course if the driver is able to maneuver it between the designated avoidance markers without striking the markers and without losing control of the boat or reducing the throttle setting. There must be no change in position of any equipment on board and there must be no change of position of personnel in order to influence the test results. There must be no instability evidenced by oscillating motion in the roll or yaw axes exhibited while negotiating the course. Note: It is recognized that operator skill and familiarity with a particular boat and motor combination will affect the test results. It is therefore considered permissible to make a number of practice runs through the test course at any throttle setting.

    (6) Maximum horsepower capacity.

    (i) For boats capable of less than 35 miles per hour, the maximum horsepower capacity must be the maximum horsepower with which the boat was able to successfully complete the Quick Turn Test Procedure in Sec. 183.53(b)(4) at full throttle or the maximum horsepower determined under the calculations in Sec. 183.53(a) of this section.

    (ii) For boats capable of 35 miles per hour or more, the maximum horsepower capacity must be the maximum horsepower with which the boat was able to successfully complete both the Quick Turn Test Procedure in Sec. 183.53(b)(4) and the Test Course Method in Sec. 183.53(b)(5) at full throttle or the calculations in Sec. 183.53(a) of this section.

    (iii) The maximum horsepower capacity determined in accordance with Sec. 183.53(b) must not exceed 40 horsepower.

    [​IMG]
     
  11. Steve5140
    Joined: Jun 2006
    Posts: 6
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Illinois

    Steve5140 Junior Member

    Hp

    My plate says 7.5 hp max. The hull design is the same as all the other aqua lark models. (from what I can see in pictures) It appears as though the just switched the top molds. I find it hard to believe that those boats could handle a 40 when mine is rated for 7.5. It may have to do with how the load is above the boat and not in it, but it still seems to much spread
     
  12. chelsene
    Joined: May 2011
    Posts: 3
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Nisswa, MN

    chelsene New Member

    I wouldn't try a 40 on the sit on top one. Maybe a 25 at the most, it would fly.
     
  13. Ike
    Joined: Apr 2006
    Posts: 2,214
    Likes: 170, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 1669
    Location: Washington

    Ike Senior Member

    The reason the USCG came up with the performance test is because if you use the standard formulas for hp rating the max usually comes out to ten or less, which may explain the 7.5 rating. Also 40 is the max, but only if the boat can pass through the test safely with 40. It may not be able to, and I have seen them with anywhere from 10 to 40, but most seem to end up with 25 or 30. I tested a boat of this type in 1985 made by Mercury that had a 35 HP merc on it and it was really squirrelly. Some professional boat testers could handle it at full throttle, but I couldn't. I couldn't get above 3/4 throttle except in a straight line. The damned thing scared the crap out of me.
     
  14. bumnut
    Joined: Oct 2011
    Posts: 1
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: australia

    bumnut New Member

    Hi 2 all I feel sorry for all of you in the states as the rules you have
    to deal with when it comes to these little pocket rockets.
    I have just done up a aqua lark 2 seater and had a 40 on it until
    she blew up.now have a 30 johno.it does about 65 kph.
    Am currently waiting for my 50 to be rebuilt and then of with the 30.
    Why do they make you follow these rules as here in australia I can
    put what ever I wish on the back of my boat.regardless of the max.hp.
    Great site and happy boating:confused:
     

  15. mppcalza
    Joined: Aug 2006
    Posts: 8
    Likes: 1, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 15
    Location: sacramento

    mppcalza mppcalza

    Zamco did produce top riders. That's what we called 'em too. The "O" was for our outboard models. "J" for jet. We mostly produced the two seater Lark and rental versions. The one that I would love to see is the electric lark. I personally saw three get built. Slooooow boats. Very Sloooow. I had two of the top riders myself. The boats were rated for a maximum of 30 hp but I had a 40 with a 30 cover and that was scary enough. I've been reading about people putting 40+ on their boats and I really don't recommend it.
    I remember the steering wheel that you have cause we had crates of them lying around taking up space, we switched to steering wheels in the 80's. I think Tamco was bought by Zamco in the 70's but the early history of Zamco is lost due to my father not really talking about it.
    Thanks all,
    Michael Calza
     
    1 person likes this.
Loading...
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.