Anyone used Seaboard?

Discussion in 'Materials' started by drewpster, May 20, 2006.

  1. drewpster
    Joined: May 2006
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    Location: Chattanooga Tn

    drewpster Unlubberly

    I recently saw a commercial on TV about a building material called Seaboard. It is a plastic product that comes in a sheet that supposedly can be worked like wood. Anybody have any experience with Seaboard? Know of any distributers in the southeast U.S? I was thinking of building some cockpit panels out of it to replace the old vinyl covered ones.
    Drew
     
  2. snapper340
    Joined: Jan 2003
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    snapper340 Junior Member

    I haven't used any, but I believe west marine carries it. I was thinking of using it on my tolman skiff when I build it, if it is as good as they say it is.
     
  3. E Hanson
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    E Hanson Junior Member

    Drewpster,

    We use the stuff all the time. Comparable product is "Starboard". Esentially the stuff is a variable density polyethalene board. Solid on the outside surface, and kind of a foam on the inside. Most manufactures make different densities for strength, weight requirements.

    You cut it with most woodworking tools. You can glue it, heat weld it, or through bolt it.

    We use it for cushion backs, Anchor locker liners, hatch covers and doors etc.

    Over all it is good stuff. It is not as strong as plywood though.

    It would be a good choice for replacement cockpit panels.

    Eric.
     
  4. SamSam
    Joined: Feb 2005
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    Location: Coastal Georgia

    SamSam Senior Member

    I've never heard of 'Seaboard' but I know 'Starboard' and it's clones aren't variable density and we never were able to glue it with anything. Through bolting or screwing to something else was the only sure way to keep it in place. Screws driven into it had to be pilot hole drilled and could still be pulled out easier than wood. Very heavy, very expensive and pretty flexible compared to plywood. Slippery as ice when it's wet. It's easy to work, no dust or splinters or itch, routing it could almost be an enjoyable hobby. We did use some stuff called 'Aireated PVC' which was a lot lighter, a lot cheaper and more flexible which looked like 'Starboard' and was like what you describe, sort of foamy on the inside, but had trouble with using it where exposed to UV rays, it would turn yellowish, shrink, warp and generally degrade. Polyester resin wouldn't stick to 'Starboard', but would to the PVC stuff. Sam
     
  5. Hunter25
    Joined: Mar 2006
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    Hunter25 Senior Member

    Starboard and other like materials are HDPE and great for cutting boards, dash boards, locker lids, cup holders, but has its limitations.

    It can not be glued, does not take fasteners well unless through bolted, will not support its own weight in long lengths, is heavy and all the things mentioned. It also can be welded, is self lubricating, makes a good lightly loaded bearing surface, is easily carved, cut and machined, is water proof, close to being neutral buoyant and pretty tough stuff, if used within its limitations. It should not be used as decking or other loaded, but not completely backed up situations.

    For cockpit panels, I would machine it pretty thin, because it is heavy stuff, but it will clean up very easily.
     
  6. moneypit
    Joined: Jun 2004
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    moneypit Junior Member

    I was told 3M 8010 is the adheasive to use, dissimular surfaces...

    Scotch-Weld(TM) DP-8010 can replace mechanical fasteners i.e. screws and rivets, and plastic welding that typically require two-step processes which include chemical etchants, priming or surface treatments in many applications prior to bonding.


    Potential Primary Surfaces Polypropylene (PP)
    Polyethylene (PE, HDPE, LDPE)
    TPO
    Potential Secondary Surfaces Fiber Reinforced Plastic (FRP)
    Primed metals
    Polycarbonate Wood
    Glass
    TPE
    PVC
    ABS
    PMMA
    Polystyrene Concrete
    Not Recommended Surfaces Silicone Surfaces
    Surfaces Containing Mold Release Polyimide Nylons
     
  7. E Hanson
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    E Hanson Junior Member

    SamSam,

    I might be confused. Its been known to happen. I'll try to get down to the shop floor and see what that material I thought was Starboard really is. I'll also see what we are using to glue it together.

    Eric
     
  8. moneypit
    Joined: Jun 2004
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    moneypit Junior Member

    E Hanson, how far do you have to travel the shop floor..:) So what did you find out?
     
  9. zorton01
    Joined: Jun 2006
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    zorton01 Junior Member

    Do uou know any link to get more info about seaboard or starboard?
    Thanks
     
  10. moneypit
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    moneypit Junior Member

    just do a google search...for starboard or HDPE ...PAR is making me feel that it is not for the deck thou...manufactures saw go for it...I have 3 4x8 sheets of 3/4" thick HDPE that I can not return....so I am doing all kinds of inquires on this stuff and 3M makes the adhesive 8010 which is supposed to glue it to just about anything...in my case FRP otherwise known as fiberglass....and wood.
     
  11. SamSam
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    SamSam Senior Member

    You might be right. I looked on this site...
    http://www.kingstarboard.com/Products/StarboardFamily.aspx
    and they have something called StarLite which is a closed cell recycled starboard polymer etc,etc, which is lighter and works where the edges won't be exposed for some reason. Somewhere on the site they say glueing isn't surefire but if you have to, use some kind of product 8005. Sam
     
  12. Hunter25
    Joined: Mar 2006
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    Hunter25 Senior Member

    Starboard or HDPE will make a pretty good deck, though slippery when wet, even the textured stuff, but it has to be placed over a substrate, like plywood or fiberglass. 3M 8010 is designed to bond it to fiberglass, but the bond is not structural, so the starboard can not bear any load and why you have to use a sub deck material. It is a good surface treatment, but not a structural material. It is also heavy as all get out, considering it needs to be backed up with a load bearing material.

    Used without a backing, it will rip up all the glue that attaches it to your stringers, the first big wave you hop over, leaving you with a hull that is flexing like crazy and a detached cockpit floor. The deck, well attached to the stringers, provides a very large portion of athwartship strength in a boat like yours.
     
  13. E Hanson
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    E Hanson Junior Member

    Ok, I made the trek to the shop floor, and this is what I found out.

    What we in design have been spec'ing as "starboard" production has been useing "SeaTeak". Yet another brandname...

    They glue it with the previously mentioned 3M Scotchweld, along with some screws.

    SamSam:

    I had a look at that website, and that the stuff I thought i was talking about. Thanks for the link. :)

    Drewpster:

    You are looking to replace trim pieces right? Or are you cockpit panels structural?

    Eric
     

  14. drewpster
    Joined: May 2006
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    Location: Chattanooga Tn

    drewpster Unlubberly

    The panels I want to replace are not structural. The original ones were made from vinyl covered 1/4 plywood. They cover the open area under the gunnels and under the aft deck and are meant only as covers that inclose the cockpit area. I may want to make some doors in the replacment panels to access these areas for storage. Will I need to use trim to finish the cut edges of the board? Its Starboard I am thinking of by the way, I had the name wrong. I guess I could use plywood, but I am not a fan of the vinyl look.
     
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