anyone slapped an outboard or oars on Hobie 16 or similar cat?

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Squidly-Diddly, Oct 22, 2011.

  1. Squidly-Diddly
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    Squidly-Diddly Senior Member

    Sometimes you just don't want to sail.

    I've also noticed Hobie HULLS are often on offer for free, or near free.

    Anyone made a adapter-backet to clamp onto the big piece of alumimum tubing and used a small outboard to make a Hobie into a motorized platform for fishing, birdwatching, etc?

    Hobie-Cat Motor-Sailor?

    How about a set of oars, and probably a big ice-chest for a elevated seat.

    Maybe one of those big chests with 4 wheels and a couple 8' x 1' x 1" planks on the tramp for "sliding seat rower". Sure, might hobby-horse a bit.
     
  2. keysdisease
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    keysdisease Senior Member

  3. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    They use Hobie Cat hulls with outboards in many rowing clubs for the coach to follow the boats.
     
  4. philSweet
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    philSweet Senior Member

    There have been dozens of fiberglass bridgedecks made to convert Hobies into dive boats, sponge boats, drug boats, chase boats, maintenance barges, gunning boats, you name it. Some were one part and others were quite fancy with four or five molds and a bit of assembly required. Unless big surf is a real concern, I've always thought the Hobie 18 was a better prospect because the hulls have a bit more bouyancy.
     
  5. upchurchmr
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    upchurchmr Senior Member

    philSweet,

    Do you have any pictures or links to such bridgedecks? I personally have never seen one.

    But I do agree the 18 would make a better boat, with my preference being a Tornado (even bigger hulls).

    Marc
     
  6. philSweet
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    philSweet Senior Member

    I went looking when I originally posted but didn't find any in the first five minutes. I think it must be a bit dated (as in before digital cameras and internet). I have seen at least six different arrangements in Florida. None of the stuff was anything to write home about, either. The fussy one probably used some parts and molds already lieing around, I was kind of amazed any one had bothered. Or maybe it sort of grew over the years. Everything I've seen would have been on the water by 1980.
     
  7. keysdisease
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    keysdisease Senior Member

  8. Tiny Turnip
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    Tiny Turnip Senior Member

    I converted a Dart 18 to pedal power, and it makes a seriously practical boat for fishing, dropping a few creels, swimming, picnicking, camping etc. Cruises all day at 4knots without getting out of breath. I'm chuffed to bits with it. Picked up the Dart with full rig and road trailer for 600 quid... I can dig out some pictures if you're interested.
     
  9. Squidly-Diddly
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    Squidly-Diddly Senior Member

    Tiny, I'm interested in the pics, please post.

    How does it handle mild wind and weather cocking?
     
  10. Tiny Turnip
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    Tiny Turnip Senior Member

    Pedal conversion of a Dart 18

    Here are some pictures of Fangle, my pedal powered conversion of a Dart 18.

    I chose the Dart in part because the cross beams were straight, and made the conversion easier. I bought reconditioned seacycle units, plus their mounting brackets, which I attached with stainless steel plates to the front ends of two longitudinal beams. I slung these beams beneath the Dart cross beams with U bolts. I replaced the trampoline with three ply panels, which were bolted down to the longitudinal beams, and supported by the extrusion which took the edge of the tramp down the inside edges of the hulls.

    The steering is achieved with a simple system of ropes and pulleys underneath the deck.

    The seats are from a Trice recumbent bicycle, with a ply base.

    The ply deck provides a substantial stable platform about 7 feet square. The boat is completely without weather protection; as the available power is so low, I thought it crucial to keep the windage to a minimum.

    We have played out in a Force 6, in reasonably sheltered water, and I wouldn't want to push it beyond that. It felt like there was a slight tendency to broach when surfing down waves, which I don't fully understand, but it wasn't a strong effect.

    You can see Sally in one of the pictures, who is well into her 70s, managing admirably.

    4 knots all day cruising speed. 5.2ish flat out. One of the most pleasing aspects is the control for close manoeuvreing - great for fishing.
     

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  11. Poida
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    Poida Senior Member

    I put an outboard motor on a surfcat, attaching it to a transom I put on the rear part of the frame.

    I used the turning mechanism of the outboard to try and turn but ended up going in the same direction sideways.

    You have to fix the outboard so it doesn't turn and use the original rudders.
     
  12. spidennis
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    spidennis Chief Sawdust Sweeper

    What is your speed with only one "engine"? And can you go for several hours or possibly all day like this?
     
  13. spidennis
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    spidennis Chief Sawdust Sweeper

    I'm also interested in the oars idea .......
    hadn't yet tried it out myself.
    the ergonomics might not be all that good?
     
  14. Tiny Turnip
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    Tiny Turnip Senior Member

    Its about 3.2 with one engine, cruise all day.
     

  15. spidennis
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    spidennis Chief Sawdust Sweeper


    pics of rowing a hobie:
    https://picasaweb.google.com/Norm742/HobieWaveRowing

    here's a thread about it:
    http://www.hobiecat.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=4324

    from the pics it does appear possible.
    I notice the sag in the tramp to lower the "engine" for a better angle.
    I can imagine that sitting up too high would mess up the ergonomics?
     
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