Anyone know about this floating egg?

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by stonedpirate, Apr 11, 2015.

  1. stonedpirate
    Joined: Nov 2009
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    stonedpirate Senior Member

    Hi all

    I am in the process of designing a small, indestructible, diesel powered coastal cruiser.

    Essentially, I am copying this design from the early 1900's

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Xu2MvR8T-Y

    I want to build mine almost exactly the same but with welds instead of rivets and no mast powered by a 10hp inboard.

    If anyone has any specific info about this boat, besides whats on the front page of google, i would love to hear about it.

    It was designed by Ole Brude.

    Thanks
     
  2. upchurchmr
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    upchurchmr Senior Member

    I wish you the best with your design, but if it really worked wouldn't there be more of them since 1900?

    Please put some padding or at least seat belts for rough weather.

    Would it be better with less of a blunt bow? It might be easier to get some place.
     
  3. stonedpirate
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    stonedpirate Senior Member

    It does really work. It crossed an ocean under sail with 3 men on board and started the closed lifeboat revolution. Since then there are thousands of closed life boats around this size.

    A short full displacement hull will only go around 3 knots so i would prefer a round nose for gentle rocking :p No point having a deep v at 3 knots and a modern diesel will have no problem getting it to hull speed.
     
  4. JamesG123
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    JamesG123 Senior Member

    This was, effectively, the prototype for todays commercial lifeboats. To be honest, it would be inefficient space wise and really uncomfortable (cold, full of condensation) to build it exactly the same. Look at the way modern ones are built. Fiberglass is much cheaper than steel.
     
  5. stonedpirate
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    stonedpirate Senior Member

    Thanks James

    Could a one off home builder realisticly glass a shape like this or similar?

    Steel is much easier and quicker for me to work with.

    Anyway, not sure how you can say it is inefficient space wise. It has more interior space than any 18' boat i have ever seen.

    As for condensation, i would use a modern extractor fan. Insulation would be foam and ply on entire interior hull.
     
  6. yofish

    yofish Previous Member

    I think you're a madman, let us set that aside for a moment, but thank you for the asking which immediately led me to that remarkable story of his crossing! Those f___g squareheads were, are and always will be, primal animals with guts of titanium. The words he uses to describe 'difficulties' are precious.

    After reading some of your other posts I'm convinced that you ARE a madman - but good on ya mate - it's obvious that you don't let the aspersion casters bother you and I hope you do never let them!

    Perhaps think aluminum, 5052 alloy and a big English Wheel. This would allow you to pack more fuel and add other design advantages. I'm pretty sure you are going to need sail, It's unimaginable to think an egg this size can carry enough fuel. This interests me because I have some similar thoughts.
     
  7. stonedpirate
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    stonedpirate Senior Member

    Well, i am no doubt a madman :p

    However, i dont plan on crossing an ocean on this thing, just use it as a camper/cruiser for no longer than a week or two at a time so fuel reserves aren't a concern.

    It will be used solo so space efficency isnt a concern either.

    It is more than big enough for one man to live on for a few weeks in relative comfort. I also dont plan on going far offshore in storms, just nice to know i have a boat that can handle the rough stuff if i ever get caught out between ports on the west coast of australia :p

    This is more of a hobby boat and can be modified as i go to suit my humble needs so optimal design and what not doesnt concern me either.

    Its a strange forum that all small boats are met with instant criticism, steel boats are met with use fibreglass or aluminium and round nose boasts are met with use a v.

    They should call this forum, copyproductionboats.net :p
     
  8. Rurudyne
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    Rurudyne Senior Member

    If it weren't for madmen who would build their own boats?

    If I were to offer any criticism of the design, as a cruiser, is that it is too short for its girth and could greatly benefit from a bow like those used on subs before the advent of nuclear power (it's shape being very nice for a sub, though, or a life boat that may face being unceremoniously plopped in the ocean at an uncertain angle of descent).

    By doing this you would gain usable interior room near the bow, and possibly at the stern too. You would have a little more territory for entering and egress. And you'd still find yourself explaining that it isn't that concrete sub they saw on YouTube. :p
     
  9. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    It looks very well ventilated, doesn't it ? :p I have some bad news about the building of it in steel, it looks to have compound curvature aplenty, so you will need plate rolling equipment and be able to use it. Which may be a godsend, if that will deter you from proceeding ! :D
     
  10. Rurudyne
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    Rurudyne Senior Member

    English Wheels are fairly cheap these days.
     
  11. stonedpirate
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    stonedpirate Senior Member

    It just may :p

    Was a bit concerned by the shape and was the only thing i was unsure about.

    May be the only thing that deters me from this boat if i cant figure out how to build it :p
     
  12. Rurudyne
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    Rurudyne Senior Member

    Hydroforming and lots and lots of water. ;)

    EDIT: I kid ... though for forming the bow and stem, if that's really the shape you want, you may want to look up metal spinning to help with the bits where there's the most compound curvature.
     
  13. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Can you imagine how sea-sick the poor sods inside would get ? No horizon, no air, no hope !
     
  14. abosely
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    abosely Senior Member

    That's quite interesting! I like it, I wouldn't build it for myself, but that doesn't mean I don't like it or don't think it's cool and interesting.

    You could make OSB & simple lumber bulkheads like for a strip plank boat hull. Build a top and bottom half with both sitting together so the shapes are as if it was one 'egg', strip plank it with medium density foam. The foam is easy to bevel for fit and doesn't need to be a perfect fit, just close. Use epoxy thickened with micro balloons to fill gaps, contour sand it then do the layups in fiberglass. A few different types of fabric can be combined for different strength in different areas.
    Then when you separate them gives a nice base to work from.

    Would give you insulation, strength, can build up shell as heavy & strong as you like. Remove former bulkheads glass interior. Probably should have a cradle to help hold shape till interior is glassed an some permanent bulkheads are built in. Could make them from plywood sheathed in glass. Cut out openings for hatch, windows, prop shaft, reinforce openings and away you go! Insulated, strong, relatively light can modify exterior shape later if desired.
    This kind of shape is where composite construction really shines. Lots of curves and no or very few straight sections.
    Just thinking out loud.

    Cheers, Allen

    PS Hey, at least your not wanting to go over Niagara Falls in it! ;-)
     

  15. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    The boat is shaped like a football, but I doubt you'd be kicking a goal making one !
     
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