Anyone has built a House boat here?

Discussion in 'Boatbuilding' started by Reef DOCG, Jun 2, 2016.

  1. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    ReefDOCG, please be advised that building things in third world countries has the advantage of not being required to comply with anything, so yeah, neat build, but good luck getting a registration in the USA.

    A barge is a simple way to go, though you can probably find a sizable one for cheaper than the major reseller sights are showing. These are also very easy to build, in several materials.
     
  2. Reef DOCG
    Joined: May 2016
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    Location: Atlantic Highlands

    Reef DOCG Junior Member

    Lmao. It's funny you say that. When I visit my family in Italy and I see the stuff they do it boggles my mind how they get away with it. And they look at me like I'm crazy, when I ask them if they had to get a permit.
    "Permit? For what? they ask. To build an addition to the house? Nah we just build whatever we want." But on the other hand their buildings have been standing for over 2000 years. So who are we to judge. My aunts "Cortile" is 670 years old and still standing.
    But in any case PAR, I believe more and more the way is to find a used barge, or simply build one. I did like your idea of a used one and retrofitting it. I wish I could find a bit more knowledge on the inside guts. ei. How they fit their tanks, pumps heaters etc. All underneathe. It sounds easy but sometimes easy is problematic. I'm not so concerned about the actual structure as I am of the inards. It's amazing that these house boats, floating homes have been around for decades yet no really detailed contraction on them. Maybe it's because there are so many different ways people construct them. But I have time and will keep at it. I'M NOT GIVING UP!
     
  3. missinginaction
    Joined: Aug 2007
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    Location: new york

    missinginaction Senior Member

    You're smart to do some research reef DOCG. You're quite young so don't rush into anything, you may find that your tastes change as you look more closely at different designs and even different styles of floating homes.

    I'd only add that you should consider the size of the boat/barge/houseboat you finally settle on. I restored a relatively small cruiser and while I had a great time doing it, I didn't realize how involved the project actually was until I was "in deep" so to speak. I would not have wanted to restore a much larger boat.

    Doing things right the first time costs money, a lot of it. You'll probably spend far more than you think you will (I did) to get a first rate result. Boats live in a damp, UV rich environment. Mother nature does her best to return everything we build to it's natural state. The larger the boat, the more expensive and time consuming is the build and the greater the maintenance, assuming you want it to last.

    Unless you're wealthy and can pay someone else to do the work I'd take a minimalist approach and try to find a craft on the smaller side. Most larger boats I see at my local club end up filled with stuff that's not needed anyway.

    Good Luck,

    MIA
     
  4. brian eiland
    Joined: Jun 2002
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    Location: St Augustine Fl, Thailand

    brian eiland Senior Member

    Polyurea Coating on steel float tubes

    First off forget the fiberglass coating. Most resins other than the epoxies do not bond that well. You would end up with water between the coating and the steel,...bad.

    There are lots of good coatings available for steel these days.

    Here is another newer product one might consider,...polyurea
    http://www.boatdesign.net/forums/metal-boat-building/preparation-interior-rust-steel-hull-35236-5.html


    http://www.yachtforums.com/threads/polyurea-coatings-for-boats-dragonshield-ballastics.16549/


    ...it might even have some antifouling properties
    http://www.boatdesign.net/forums/boat-design/new-antifoul-discovery-100-effective-green-27399-7.html
     
  5. brian eiland
    Joined: Jun 2002
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    Location: St Augustine Fl, Thailand

    brian eiland Senior Member

  6. brian eiland
    Joined: Jun 2002
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    Location: St Augustine Fl, Thailand

    brian eiland Senior Member

    I think I have supplied you with lots of reading material for now. Just wanted to let you know that I'm leaving for a trip to Panama this week and won't be back for 7-10 days,...and I am NOT taking a computer nor electronics of any kind along. So if you have a most immediate question of me, ask it now?
     
  7. Wavewacker
    Joined: Aug 2010
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    Location: Springfield, Mo.

    Wavewacker Senior Member

    Before I'd venture too far in such studies, you should find a location suitable for your build as PAR suggested.

    You can forget about any Corps of Engineers waterways and lakes or any utility owned lake, often any mooring is limited to 24 hours then you must move it.

    There are floating home communities in WA state and AK if you want to to up with ice.

    You may have fun with draining the black water tanks and hauling that out, if you don't have fresh water plumbing to your barge, it gets really old toting water in.

    I've had 2 cabins, one on a river the other a lake, terrain to the water can be a PITA, up and down a hill. At the lake I had to pack everything about 120 feet, the river cabin hd a driveway.

    Just saying, select a spot first, then see what might be required, then build to suit the requirements and the lot. :)
     
  8. Reef DOCG
    Joined: May 2016
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    Location: Atlantic Highlands

    Reef DOCG Junior Member

    Wealthy I am not. more of a go-getter. I enjoy building and I do most on my own. This project would be more for a life time living "Home" I don't care to have something too large as you stated well more money more upkeep. I guess my question would be what does one consider large? would a platform of 30x40 with a structure f lets say 22x30 be considered large? I would want some outside space for planting and have some type of a deck.
    Thank you for your thoughts.
     
  9. Reef DOCG
    Joined: May 2016
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    Location: Atlantic Highlands

    Reef DOCG Junior Member

    Well enjoy your vacation sir. hope to hear from you when you get back.
     
  10. Reef DOCG
    Joined: May 2016
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    Location: Atlantic Highlands

    Reef DOCG Junior Member

    That is definitely a priority! I agree. That is the math I'm doing. Do I pay mooring fees Or invest that money in a piece of property. There is so much to think about ahead of time so one doesn't regret making certain choices.

    Does anyone here pay mooring fees? If so, do you regret maybe not buying a property instead? What are you thoughts? Or is there good reasons to rent a mooring?
     
  11. brian eiland
    Joined: Jun 2002
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    Location: St Augustine Fl, Thailand

    brian eiland Senior Member

    International Homebuilders Show

    Several years ago when I was looking more seriously at building a 'floating cottage' for my Thai wife and myself, I attended a fascinating show in Orlando FL, the International Homebuilders Show. I wanted to see what new materials there were in the homebuilding market, particularly light weight ones.

    As I said it was a fascinating show with lots of different ideas and materials. I just looked up their schdule for this year and see that the show has returned to the east coast,...Orlando Fl, in Jan 2017
    https://www.buildersshow.com/Home/

    I will be attending that show again, and plan on spending 2 days just to get thru the Exhibits.
     
  12. JotM
    Joined: Jan 2009
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    Location: Leiden, the Netherlands

    JotM Junior Member

    In order to generate some more ideas, you might also search Google Images on "woonschip", "woonboot", "woonark" or "waterwoning".
    You'll end up with a load of examples from the Netherlands.
    Living in floating houses has been on the rise again recently, as climate change makes more retention basins necessary. Having people living in/on the retention basins is nice from multiple perspectives. It just makes sense in a country of which 40% is below (a still rising) sea level.

    Housing ranges form
    [​IMG]
    to
    [​IMG]

    Moving them might be a challenge sometimes.
    [​IMG]

    http://img.rtvoost.nl/T3/6682.jpg
     
  13. mydauphin
    Joined: Apr 2007
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    Location: Florida

    mydauphin Senior Member

    Be wary of unpropelled house boats or boat houses. Lots of places are making living on them impossible or very expensive. A self-propelled boat no matter how bad is easier to find dockage for.
     
  14. jorgepease
    Joined: Feb 2012
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    Location: Florida

    jorgepease Senior Member

    A self propelled boat is also exempt from paying property taxes at least in Florida ) otherwise it's a house )
     

  15. shipwright
    Joined: Oct 2016
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    Location: Australia

    shipwright Junior Member

    H-boat

    Hi mate, do not know your area, but I would imagine situation would be similar everywhere, Insurance cover is pretty much mandatory all over, which means you will have to build to some standard, you can build in some departures from the norm as long as you have a surveyor willing to sign off on finished project, would also be necessary for finance.
    Re hull design-build this is the easy part, the big bucks come in house structure and fitout.

    Shipwright:cool:
     
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