Any super economical motorboats out there?

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Steve W, Nov 11, 2011.

  1. Tad
    Joined: Mar 2002
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    Location: Flattop Islands

    Tad Boat Designer

    This 40' by 8' strip-planked 5500 pound cruiser is under construction locally. If finished to design weight she should make 12 knots with a 25 HP Volvo diesel.

    B40view01.jpg
     
  2. Steve W
    Joined: Jul 2004
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    Location: Duluth, Minnesota

    Steve W Senior Member

    David, Sarrissa sure looks like a nice boat but as you say, out of the budget. Tad, i love that boat,your design i assume? This is the kind of powerboat that appeals greatly to me, i always liked your Yellow Cedar design.
    Steve.
     
  3. Easy Rider
    Joined: Oct 2009
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    Location: NW Washington State USA

    Easy Rider Senior Member

    Steve,
    Look at TAD's web site and see the Berry Point 26.
     
  4. Tad
    Joined: Mar 2002
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    Location: Flattop Islands

    Tad Boat Designer

    Well this is 2' longer and 2' narrower than Yellow Cedar, and will weight about 1/3rd as much.......It's a very limited boat.....

    The owner/builder gets much credit for this boat, she's his concept and arrangement, I pulled it together and designed the hull, which is actually a stretched 25' fast motorsailer.

    To maintain her performance this boat must be built light and kept that way, few people think like that........Motion in a sea will be quick and tiring, but she's only intended for Gulf of Georgia and Desolation Sound cruising.
     
  5. Willallison
    Joined: Oct 2001
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    Location: Australia

    Willallison Senior Member

    I was going to suggest a Willard 30 like this but note that Easy has already beaten me to it. It looks like it's outside the budget anyway...

    David, Sarissa is definitely not a fast displacement boat. In order to operate at those sort of speeds in displacement mode, the length:beam ratio would need to be well in excess of 12:1, not the approx. 4:1 that Sarissa has. She's a fabulous boat - I have written back & forth with Mr. Grifftih's, who still owns and operates her... he's a happy customer...

    I agree with Tad... for most, the compromises necessary to attain out-of-the-ordinary efficiency are simply not worth it.
    I also think you should treat claims of extraordinary mileage attained from very ordinary vessels (like the Albin) with a grain of salt....
     
  6. moTthediesel
    Joined: Apr 2006
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    Location: 1k Islands

    moTthediesel Junior Member

    Tad,

    "few people think like that"

    I'm sure you're right, but I'm definitely one of the few --- in a way, this boat could be thought of as a sort of giant, decked, diesel powered freight canoe; no?

    Is there anywhere that we can see more details on this boat? Website? Builders blog? etc...

    It certainly runs against current trends in cruising boat design, I'm guessing for one that at 5500#, it will not be equipped with any granite counter tops? ;)
     
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  7. Tad
    Joined: Mar 2002
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    Location: Flattop Islands

    Tad Boat Designer

    There is nothing revolutionary about this hull, she is the result of minimum displacement and higher speed requirements. The canoe body draws about 14.5" and she has a deep keel aft to fully protect the prop and rudder. I'm concerned she'll drift sideways at high speed in a cross wind and would like to see a lifting "control board" just aft of midships, but so far the owner is resisting that complication. The entrance is very long and fine, her bottom midships has moderate deadrise with a hard turn to the bilge just above the waterline, and her stern is almost completely flat under water (immersion at the transom is 3").

    Her hull is 3/4" cedar strip-planking with glass sheathing inside and out. Deck and house top are foam cored glass. Permanent bulkheads are fillet and taped in every 4' and extend up to the side deck, temp molds between these become floors below the sole.

    There is 12' of open cockpit with a tiny engine box at it's forward end, she may have an open transom or a vertical radiused one like a lobster boat. The flat cockpit sole is watertight and 6-8" above waterline. The deckhouse is also 12' long and has 6'6" headroom on centerline. There is a enclosed head in the aft port corner, a small galley bench, settee and dinette. Fuel, water, and batteries are under the sole here. The forward cabin has two bunks, two lockers, and no sole. There are access doors with hatches forward and aft. The forward access opens into the 8' long forward cockpit. It's sole is 18" above waterline so volume is limited and drainage huge. Side decks are 5.5" wide so bow access is through the forward cabin, the cockpit is a safe place to handle anchors or bow lines.

    With the little engine far away out the door, she will be a very quiet and relaxed 10 knot cruiser.
     
  8. Steve W
    Joined: Jul 2004
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    Steve W Senior Member

    I like it a lot Tad, nice low cost "appropriate"technology and as usual, stunning to look at, i look forward to seeing her finished.
    Steve.
     
  9. Willallison
    Joined: Oct 2001
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    Location: Australia

    Willallison Senior Member

    No - in spite of the obvious increase in interest from the boat-buying public in all things "green", it seems there is still some way to go yet. There is still a perception - & its one that is actively promoted by the bigger manufacturer's - that you can have your cake and eat it too: that you can still have that fat floating condo, but that by some miracle of technological innovation it will no longer be a guzzler of resources.
    The reality is that the market for a vessel that tips the scales more towards efficiency than comfort is still a niche one. The lack of market success for Nigel Irens LDL series, which is similar in concept to Tad's is proof enough of that.
    I hope to build a proof of concept for an economical hullform in the next year or so myself. It will be a development of a design I prepared a while back called Sliver ( http://imaginocean.net/contents/en-us/d16.html ). I'm toying with some preliminary sketches for a larger, more comodius version, at the moment. But again, the market for such a vessel is likely to be small... for now at least....
     
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  10. SVO
    Joined: Nov 2011
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    Location: Germany

    SVO Junior Member

    Hallo,
    look her:a Dutch site http://www.albin-25.nl/
    a new Albin is the Bonum 25,255, Albin 800.

    many gretings from Gemany

    SVO
     
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