Any alternative for this kind of 20'container transport?

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Lemans, Feb 8, 2012.

  1. Lemans
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    Lemans Lemans

    The intro explains ..well most everything. An alternative for a small boat that can carry a 20' container in coast waters and up river.
     

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  2. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    I think a 20ft containor is about 25,000 kg. loaded.
     
  3. fastwave
    Joined: Jan 2007
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    fastwave Junior Member

    I am not sure if there is a company offering a ready made version, but if someone is serious about it they could easily get a custom design for this purpose.

    This could be an interesting market niche, but would the locals be willing to pay for a new boat?
     
  4. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    In the Netherlands I see countless steel barges built for one or two containers and used on canals . Not what you would want to navigate the North Sea with. You need to clarify your area of operation .

    A seaworthy , self propelled ,single container craft would be a substantial, expensive boat.
     
  5. stonedpirate
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    stonedpirate Senior Member

    5 dollar

    nah, they would just steal it :p
     
  6. Lemans
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    Location: Belgium

    Lemans Lemans

    I think a 20ft container is about 25,000 kg. Loaded.
    Yes, that's correct. I expect the container you see on the photo not loaded at full capacity.

    'I am not sure if there is a company offering a ready made version, but if someone is serious about it they could easily get a custom design for this purpose.'
    Even if a ready made version exist, the boat is meant to be operated in the Gulf of Mexico.
    Building one in Europe and transporting it to the Caribbean is not impossible.
    However, it would be nice if they could be repaired and/or build by locals.

    'This could be an interesting market niche, but would the locals be willing to pay for a new boat?'
    It's the client who need the goods shipped who is going to pay for the new boat(s).

    'In the Netherlands I see countless steel barges built for one or two containers and used on canals . Not what you would want to navigate the North Sea with. You need to clarify your area of operation A seaworthy , self propelled ,single container craft would be a substantial, expensive boat.'
    Areas of operations are the coast waters and rivers in Central America / Gulf of Mexico.
    Seaworthy? Are all seas the same? I think it must be possible to avoid being out at sea during storms or hurricanes.
    Self propelled? Yes, but almost any power layout will do. It must be possible to navigate and 5 to 10 knots is sufficient.
    Expensive? I believe we can avoid that. That's why I'm launching this thread on this forum. A lot of experience to push idea's into the right direction.

    First thing I like to find out is if these small vessels relay on the rigidity of the container it selves.
    In other words...is the container used to reinforce the boat's structure?
     
  7. stonedpirate
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    stonedpirate Senior Member

    Looks like the local pirates just raided a container ship.

    If you are looking for a business opportunity, design a fleet of mini gunships that can be deployed from container ships :p
     
  8. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    The Gulf of Mexico gets severe weather. I have been pounded on it several times. Even in larger boats, like a 185 foot supply tug, it can be difficult. The maximum legal load on a 20' container is 24,000kg. However, they sometimes get overloaded, and the design needs to account for that. There is no way the boat in the photo is displacing 28 metric tons or so. Barges are the ideal lighters, since they are used to go from a ship to shore only.
     
  9. stonedpirate
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    stonedpirate Senior Member

    cocaine is less dense than water
     
  10. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    The density of cocaine is 1.216g/cm3 according to wolframalpha.com . That is denser than water
     
  11. stonedpirate
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    stonedpirate Senior Member

    was just a joke..
     
  12. lewisboats
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    lewisboats Obsessed Member

    This intrigued me so I did a bit of a sketch.

    This displaces 30 tonnes and is 39 ft long, developable so it can come out of wood planking, plywood or steel. It has an optional pilot house with a diesel engine under the PH sole with a near horizontal shaft that will exit at the buttocks curve so the whole thing draws just a hair over 1 meter (41").

    [​IMG]
     
  13. Tad
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    Tad Boat Designer

    Note that these guys already have small outboards....there's your power source, speed is not the issue.

    We don't know what the unloading facilities are but unloading horizontally (rollers) will be easier than a vertical lift (requiring a crane). I would look at something based on the LCP Higgins boat (plywood) from WWII........ A flat bottomed vertical sided "box boat" will be cheaper, provide max carrying capacity for it's size, lowest loading (max stability), and be best for beaching.
     
  14. Lemans
    Joined: Nov 2011
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    Lemans Lemans

    Gonzo ....
    'However, they sometimes get overloaded, and the design needs to account for that.'

    That's important info, so, safety factor 1,5?

    'Barges are the ideal lighters, since they are used to go from a ship to shore only.'
    Flat and wide means more stable and less draught....
    Is a flat bottom / multi hull shape an option?



    lewisboats

    First and fore all, thanks for the sketch!
    What about stability? We never know how the container is loaded.
    Center of gravity can by high above waterline and Tad has a point if it comes to unloading the boat.

    Tad

    'Note that these guys already have small outboards....there's your power source, speed is not the issue'
    If I have a choice I prefer to use two inboards. (behind secure doors...)

    'We don't know what the unloading facilities are but unloading horizontally (rollers) will be easier than a vertical lift (requiring a crane).'
    I will not count on available 'unloading facilities'. Let's include these rollers and horizontal unloading on the specs list.

    'I would look at something based on the LCP Higgins boat (plywood) from WWII........ A flat bottomed vertical sided
    "box boat" will be cheaper, provide max carrying capacity for it's size, lowest loading (max stability), and be best for beaching.'

    I have looked at the LCP Higgins and it looks made for this job. It must be possible to modify the design to sail into the other direction.
    The container will be in the way to navigate the boat.
     

  15. RonL
    Joined: Nov 2010
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    RonL Junior Member

    Local Facilities on the Gulf Of Mexico

    Hello Lemans,
    I deleted a post because I had overlooked your post #6, as to funds and location of operation.
    I lived for many years in the city of Houma, La. and was active in building and modifying push boats and tugs. I would think that unless there is a significant savings in materials in your location (assuming Belgium or near) many of the smaller shipyards along the Gulf Coast might produce a finished product that would meet any requirements you have.

    The picture and what is going on with the enterprising people, put in my mind a less serious thought about your questions.

    Sorry for the delete, but even with an apology the words did not fit the context of your thread. The thought was as low budget as could be found and would in no way pass Coast Guard standards, not to mention surviving gulf water conditions.

    I have chased a few break away barges in the Mississippi Sound. I get tired just remembering:)

    Best wishes to your project.

    RonL
     
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