Another way to design & build in Aluminium boats

Discussion in 'Metal Boat Building' started by monomad, May 17, 2014.

  1. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    I don't know whether he wants to save weight, the trend in building this type of boat is to go heavier, to try and compete with the superior ride of glass boats. Not successfully as a rule, but some not so bad.
     
  2. monomad
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    monomad Junior Member

    Hi TANSL
    Thank you for your interest in what I have been doing.
    I have had experience in CNC cutting with plasma, laser and router when I have worked for other boat builders and I find that when custom building one-offs it is just as quick marking and cutting it out my self, plus I like the challenge.
     
  3. TANSL
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    TANSL Senior Member

  4. monomad
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    monomad Junior Member

    Strength , weight , ride , sea conditions and what you are going to use the boat for all play a role in how you build that boat.
    But for an all round boat you would look for Strength ( long lasting ) Weight , weight down low for stability .Ride , A more comfortable ride with out been bounced around in choppy water.
    The way I design and fabricate my boats, I try and use pressings where ever I can to avoid weld distortion and to minimize the use of scantlings.
    All boat building materials have their fors and against and to say that one is superior is pushing the envelope.
    I have worked with fiberglass before, but I prefer working with Aluminium.

    TANSL Tanks, I will keep that in mind.
     

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  5. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    If there's a rock 'n' roll heaven, (apologies to the Righteous Brothers) that boat could be going there, imo. "Too heavy" the 'experts' here say, probably too much rise in the bottom says me. A good set of trim tabs and don't stop motoring. Show us a pic of the bow area.
     
  6. yofish

    yofish Previous Member

    mono, thanks for sharing your ways of construction and design. I really enjoy trying to parse how others come to understand things and manipulate their environment to achieve ends. I will tell you that your style is not mine but nonetheless, I really appreciate your explanations of technique and how you derived them - everything you say makes sense to me.

    The Colt is a nice touch, it'll really push that baby! I have a Junior that I've used on a 6' inflatable moose hunting for years.
     
  7. monomad
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    monomad Junior Member

    The first boat is the one we have been talking about . 22 degrees
    2 photo is my 7.5m 20 degrees
    3 is my 23m 18 degrees
    All of these boats have go very good stability at rest and up on the plan.
    All of my boats do not use trim tabs
     

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  8. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    A little hard to see what is there, but have you worked some hollow flare in to the topsides of the middle boat forward ? Has got me tricked looking at it, how you have done that.
     
  9. daiquiri
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    daiquiri Engineering and Design

    That's a good-looking boat, Monomad, and some really nice exhibition of metalworking skills.
    Oh, and I appreciate that wild outboard beast hanging on it's transom. ;) :D
    Cheers
     
  10. monomad
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    monomad Junior Member

    Mr Efficiency
    Hi, Yes there is a flare in the bow of that boat.
    No rolling, No fancy presses just a bit of working out and some good tools.
    I love it when someone says to me you can't do that because that just makes me put my thinking cap on and say there's got to be a way.
     
  11. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Yeah, I can't quite see from the photo what you have done, but it would be an interesting point of difference. You are obviously adept at the task.
     
  12. monomad
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    monomad Junior Member

    Hi, This is the 7.5m built in the 1994.
    When I am going to work with aluminium I try to get some style and shape that can be built with out to much trouble.
     

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  13. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Where are you based ?
     
  14. monomad
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    monomad Junior Member

    Brisbane
     

  15. Kevin Morin
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    Kevin Morin Junior Member

    Edge Treatments?

    Monomad, are you willing to discuss the very exotic edge treatments of the chines and keel of the 22deg boat?

    It seems lots of effort was spent to get an edge that isn't exactly 'normal' so it must have been for a very good reason?

    The keel seems 'shingled' a bit in the photo, perhaps it's a resolution issue with my display; but that does show some 'jagged' or almost pixelated 'steps' at the centerline in the bow on view?

    Also there was a rounded keel section, in the inverted view, but the bow stem bar/cut plate was proud or down from the cylindrical shape of the frames? Just raises more questions again.

    Elegant designs, very nice use of press forming and very nicely conceived and built shape transitions- especially along the topsides at about amidships.

    Thanks for posting, some of the most intriguing welded aluminum boat work posted online in a long time! Does a carefully 'ragged' chine provide performance enhancement? There has to be a reason for that much effort on a chine extrusion.

    Cheers,
    Kevin Morin
    Kenai, AK
     
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