Another "revolutionary new" hull design

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by DCockey, Oct 16, 2011.

  1. Man Overboard
    Joined: Oct 2006
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    Man Overboard Tom Fugate

    Yes, your chart helps to visualize this quite well. I also noticed by the chart how similar the diesel sterndrive is to the diesel shaft drive on the Hunter. In this speed and weight class you would want to make your propulsion decision on other factors than just efficiency/fuel consumption, especially considering the extra cost of the stern drive, as others have pointed out. For my needs I prefer the sterndrive.

    groper: The graphite is 2,900 kilograms - Cruising Condition; 50% Fuel & Water ( Fuel Capacity - 525 liters : Water Capacity - 400 liters)

    Source: http://www.imaginocean.net/contents/en-us/d8.html
     
  2. Willallison
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    Willallison Senior Member

    2900kg was the target displacement for the boat in what I'd describe as "light cruising" condition... in other words a realistic weight that you would expect the boat to be without it being loaded to the hilt. This allows for an all-up towing weight of under 3500kg with an aluminium trailer.
    Hull number 1 (the only one built so far!) was predictably a little more than that. Following boats ought to achieve the weight target without too much trouble. The consumption figures were taken with quite a bit of stuff aboard... I would estimate the boat weighed in at around 3500kg at the time.

    MOB - as I noted above, I agree... the shaft boat shows exceptional efficiency compared to it's sterndrive alternative.
    I had a quick look online to compare shaft vs leg costs... a mercruiser 300hp MPI with Bravo drive can be had for approx USD $ 12700. It's shaft driven alternative is $9500. Add a minimum of $1000 for shaft, prop, strut etc, plus the extra time involved in the installation and suddenly the initial cost diefference doesn't really amount to much...
     
  3. Man Overboard
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    Man Overboard Tom Fugate

    Yes, it isn't that big a difference in cost, I find that quite surprising.
     
  4. viking north
    Joined: Dec 2010
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    viking north VINLAND

    Something doesn't add up there--I suspect the profit margin on a shaft drive is somewhat higher than the inboard/outboard/outdrive/leg. (another array of names depending on geographical location). Still a saving of over $3200 on $12,700 is nothing to sneeze at especially when the taxes are added on that $3000 extra cost. Here in Canada that averages around $450.00. (15%) With the condition of the present economy and the market flooded with used, my hat goes off to anyone introducing a new craft to the market place. This thread being a prime example of the dog eat dog world of the toy buisness we're headed into. One of the few perks of getting too old and tired to continue the battle :mad:(sad) :D
     
  5. Willallison
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    Willallison Senior Member

  6. viking north
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    Location: Newfoundland & Nova Scotia

    viking north VINLAND

    From their numbers I think you're pretty well dead on . My latest personal and hopefully last big build (offers I can't refuse) is powered by a 3 cyl. 30hp. Yanmar/marine tranny/shaft drive cost me in around $13000 taxes in. Yup- the power plants certianlly add to the sticker shock regardless of the craft--
     
  7. Willallison
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    Willallison Senior Member

    Huh!!... the good deal I got on the Yanmar 6BY 260 in Graphite was a measly 38K:eek:
    Mind you, you can pay easily pay that much for an outboard these days...
    And people wonder why it costs so much to build....
     
  8. Poida
    Joined: Apr 2006
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    Poida Senior Member

    Well, I regard the Cutwater as a nice boat. I think a boat has to look nice on the trailer, the Cutwater is the type of boat I would buy, so I could park it outside the dive shop to get my tanks filled. Or drive it through the "drive through liquor store" for a few beers.

    Admirer "Nice boat mate,"

    Me "Yeah rides on air"

    Admirer "How fast she'll go"

    Me "'bout 20 knots"

    Admirer, "What's that in Kilometers per hour?"

    Me, " 'bout 120"

    Admirer, "**** that's fast."

    Me, "Yeah"

    No, all joking aside (because no one was laughing anyway) if you want to build a boat that sells, don't worry about economy.

    If you wanted to save money, you wouldn't buy a boat in the first place.

    Just build something that looks nice.

    I'm going now.

    Poida
     

  9. Wayne Grabow
    Joined: Aug 2003
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    Wayne Grabow Senior Member

    My brother brought my attention to this boat. He saw it at the Seattle boat show and really thought it might be well-suited to his needs. He is a long-time powerboater who currently trails a SeaRay 28 throughout the western US and through the San Juans to Vancouver, BC. Having said that, I think that he was mainly looking at the accomodations, not at the hull bottom. When he suggested I take a look at it on the website, my impression has been in line with other coments on this thread. The point being that some aspects of it are well done.
     
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