anchoring with two hooks catamaran

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by Charlyipad, Nov 6, 2015.

  1. Charlyipad
    Joined: May 2014
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    Location: St Simons is ga

    Charlyipad Senior Member

    Sometimes there are situations when there isn't enough room to swing. How would you set up a Bahamain moor (two rodes, two anchors) with a cat? My bridle set up is a separate bridle, that is spliced. the tail end is a fathom or so, and gets tied with a rolling hitch to the rode when the scope is right for the particular depth in the anchorage. (Rode is 3/4 nylon three strand with a boats length of chain)

    On monohulls, ie no bridle, it is easy enough to drop one hook, fall back twice the needed scope, drop another hook, kedge back up half way the first rode, tie both rodes off, and start dinner. Only downside is they twist up sometimes if you stay there long enough for several tide changes.

    What does everybody else do? Anyone actually use two bridles? It needs to be a flexible solution.

    Thanks
     
    hoytedow likes this.
  2. Richard Woods
    Joined: Jun 2006
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    Location: Back full time in the UK

    Richard Woods Woods Designs

    I usually put a bridle on my main anchor but my second (kedge) I probably wouldn't, but of course it is easy enough to add one later. But usually with two anchors out the boat doesn't swing around. Fortunately you sail in relatively shallow water. In deep water I usually have to put out the second anchor with a dinghy

    If I leave the boat anchored for a long time then I use a swivel to attach both warps but it is too complicated for only a few days.

    The skipper of the Crowther 33 cat I crossed the Atlantic on never used a bridle yet his boat stayed fairly well windrode

    Richard Woods
     
  3. cavalier mk2
    Joined: Mar 2010
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    Location: Pacific NW North America

    cavalier mk2 Senior Member

    In small shallow bays I orient the boat fore and aft to the prevailing wind and current directions and just run out a stern anchor after setting the bow.. When the tide changes it takes the load. If the wind suddenly kicks in from the side there is good separation and the loads are shared. These areas are protected from waves of course. This way I can run decent scope without worrying about grounding while swinging as the tide goes out.
     
  4. Charlyipad
    Joined: May 2014
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    Location: St Simons is ga

    Charlyipad Senior Member

    In the narrow creeks around here fore and aft might be the best solution- I haven't tried it yet. Now that I have an aft platform built I plan to mount an anchor back there, though I hate to add the weight. Of course weight is a problem anywhere on a multi. Those fortress anchors look pretty nice. Anyone use them?

    Love to hear anchor related stories on multis.
     
  5. Barra
    Joined: Feb 2014
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    Location: Perth

    Barra Junior Member

    I use a small amount of chain and 3/4 nylon rode on a bridle for the main.

    Don't tie the rode to the bridal. You may want to be able to release it quickly.
    Instead each side of the bridal has a loop approximately 200 mm long spliced in it.

    The two loops are bought together and a short bight of anchor rode is poked through and a wooden wedge (400mm x 75mm x 50 mm)is placed in the loop of the rode, and snugged down on these loops. Release the bridal and the boat falls back to tension the bridal.

    Friction holds the whole lot in position. A light retrieval line in the thick end of the wedge can be jerked to release the bridal/rode junction.

    If the rode slips on the wedge then an extra turn or two of the rode around the wedge
    will add friction. You'll work it out.

    Not my idea but i've been using it for 25 years. Works great for me.

    When anchoring for and aft in a narrow creek, preplanning is the go.
    Flake out your stern anchor rode, kick stern anchor over the side whilst still moving forward, drop main anchor when ready and pull back on stern anchor when the main is set.
     
  6. Richard Woods
    Joined: Jun 2006
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    Richard Woods Woods Designs

    I am very pleased with my Mantus anchor. Usually I use Deltas. I sold my Fortress. I don't like the fact that the warp can catch on the anchor and lift it out if you swing on the tide

    I have often released the bridles from the bow cleats to let out extra warp. However you do it, bear in mind the fact that you may need to let out more warp

    I hate the under tramp anchors popular on charter boats. You cannot see the warp and cleaning anchor is almost impossible, as is adding a second anchor of course

    RW
     
  7. Charlyipad
    Joined: May 2014
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    Location: St Simons is ga

    Charlyipad Senior Member

    Here is my current setup. Since I designed it myself I am a little insecure about it and would love to hear any criticisms.

    Rode is ind├ępendant and can go direct to the samson post. Post is secured well to the platform, but platform is only lashed to the aluminum compression tubes. The spliced end of the bridle tip is fed underneath the tramp and up through the well to be tied off on the rode when needed. Bridle ends are fed through horizontal holes in the hulls at the bow- I don't know what you would call them- they are like bow thruster tubes only out of the water. From there the bridle ends come up to the bow cleats, where they can be adjusted for chafe. The idea is to let the hull take the brunt of the load, and not the bow cleats. The big wooden cleats on the platform each side of the anchor are just to secure the bridle when not in use, to keep it from sagging down underneath.

    Any comments appreciated.
     

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  8. Boatguy30
    Joined: Dec 2011
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    Location: St Augustine, FL

    Boatguy30 Senior Member

    Charly

    I originally had something like that but am now putting a roller on the front beam AMD gotten rid of the catwalk. Guess you need those compression tubes which I don't have. I also tie the bridle to the bow beam just inboard from the hull sides. Also using just 3/8" for the bridle so its nice and stretchy, but not used for permanent mooring.

    Your net is am interesting design. Has it worked out well?
     
  9. Charlyipad
    Joined: May 2014
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    Location: St Simons is ga

    Charlyipad Senior Member

    Hey boatguy, good to hear from you.
    Why did you change it? My reasoning has been to keep the anchor away from the plywood bow beam to lessen the possibility of gouging it up, and to get the weight farther aft. The main downsides in my arrangement, that I can think of, is rode slamming on underside of bow beam if the boat is pitching very wildy. it would have to be VERY wildly. and, maybe the possibility of the lashings giving a little where the anchor platform is tied off to the tubes ,if the bridle was not being used, and the boat was pulling real hard on the samson post.

    The "tramp" has worked out well as far as weight carrying ability and just feeling safe on it. (photo) Hard to get a real professional look though unless you can come up with a good neat way to tie off the ends. I just tied mine off like a necktie and it looks like sh*t, frankly. I use a ss rachet from cargo control to tension the horizontal runs and it works fine, but you have to let it work over time, as there is a lot of friction at all the turns.

    Are you using that big ol plow you picked up here? That thing was a mambo.
     

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  10. Boatguy30
    Joined: Dec 2011
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    Location: St Augustine, FL

    Boatguy30 Senior Member

    Did not realize you had a wood now beam, that is a concern. The inner roller location is OK, I just figured my catwalk was a bunch of extra weight and really wasn't strong enough for handling the anchor in a rough anchorage.

    I used the big CQR last fall for long term anchoring in salt run. I have a 12kg Vulcan I recently bought as my delta type anchor which was a bit larger did not have the right shank curve to fit around the beam.

    Going to keep MoJo in south Florida over the winter with a 6-8 week trip to the Bahamas then home in March, planning to head N to New England next summer.
     
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