anchor "STORM" DIY

Discussion in 'Projects & Proposals' started by Bonaparte, Jan 4, 2018.

  1. Bonaparte
    Joined: Sep 2017
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    Location: Koper, Slovenia EU

    Bonaparte Junior Member

    Material: S355JR G2

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  2. Bonaparte
    Joined: Sep 2017
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    Location: Koper, Slovenia EU

    Bonaparte Junior Member

  3. Angélique
    Joined: Feb 2009
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    Being a two part issue is again only an advantage for Mantus there, and not for the customer.
    According to Murphy with the storm anchor disassembled stored in the bilge there will be a day (or night) you're fighting your way off a lee shore, and then when you're unable to make it, you're also unable to drop the storm anchor, because it still lies disassembled stored in the bilge, and so while you there unsuccessful fighting your way off that lee shore, you have no time to get and assemble the storm anchor and bring it in position when you need it most.

    I'm not religious of any kind, but I'll think lessons can be learned from the Parable of the Ten Virgins, so be prepared and don't store any emergency stuff disassembled in the bilge.

    line 13 of the parable‘‘ keep watch, because you do not know the day or the hour ’’
     
    Last edited: May 7, 2018
  4. Bonaparte
    Joined: Sep 2017
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    Location: Koper, Slovenia EU

    Bonaparte Junior Member

    I will have only one anchor on the boat. But this will be good anchor.
     
  5. Dieselguy
    Joined: Apr 2018
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    Location: Scotland

    Dieselguy Junior Member

    I think you should keep a small "kedge" anchor onboard too.
    Your anchor design certainly looks like 'the business'.
    Cheers.
     
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  6. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    That is bad seamanship.
     
  7. ImaginaryNumber
    Joined: May 2009
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    FWIW, it's a three-part anchor; blade, stock, hoop (plus bolts, etc) ;)

    Part of the advantage to Mantus may also accrue to the customer. An anchor, which can be shipped flat, may be cheaper both to Mantus and to the customer. And a customer who damages part of an anchor may be able to purchase a replacement part cheaper than buying a whole new anchor.
    I think of a storm anchor as being reserved for use during hurricanes/typhoons, which generally are known about well in advance. In the mean time, the anchor is adding ballast to the boat, thus fulfilling its obligation to have at least two uses for everything on board. :rolleyes:

    Also, as Gonzo suggested, it's not a bad thing to have an extra anchor or two on board in case your primary anchor becomes irretrievably fouled. All good reasons for a disassemblable or folding anchor.

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    Northill folding stainless steel anchor
     
  8. Angélique
    Joined: Feb 2009
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    Now that's no reason to disassemble any anchor, in the contrary, you gave a reason to have the other anchors ready for use.
    All those reasons are passing by that a certain class of events may occur all the time, but are only noticed when they become a nuisance, such as forgetting to assemble the storm anchor when you may need it, or underestimating the upcoming weather in relation with the local currents, or rapidly deteriorating weather conditions, which sometimes can go faster than beforehand predicted.
    The benefits of a folding anchor are quite different to a disassembled one stored in the bilge, although the blade angles there look to me to be too much near parallel to the stock for a good dig in, would love to see some underwater footage of that process.

    BTW, are they forced to be always spread out when deployed . . ?
     
  9. Angélique
    Joined: Feb 2009
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)


     
  10. ImaginaryNumber
    Joined: May 2009
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    In a perfect world all extra anchors would stay permanently shackled to their rodes, and all sails would stay permanently hanked onto the rigging. But since we don't live in a perfect world, many items have to be stowed in less than convenient locations. In the case of extra anchors that often means somewhere in the bilges.

    The Northill anchor was adapted for use by the Catalina flying boats during WWII because of their compact shape and light weight.

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  11. Angélique
    Joined: Feb 2009
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    I'm OK with you disassemble them first before doing so, but it give me peace of mind I've warned about it.
     
  12. Angélique
    Joined: Feb 2009
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    Steve of the last video in post #54 has posted a lot of his anchor test videos, here's #1, and here's #70, the rest till now is in between.

    There's a thread about it on the Trawler forums: Anchor setting Videos

    The anchor test boat in the vids is an aluminum built ± 34' LOD Colvin Saugeen Witch* gaff sloop, with a pilot house instead of a cockpit, which usually sails in the PNW.

    * Wayback Machine link to Tom's moderate displacement ocean sailing designs, since Tom's R.I.P. own website is offline since a while now.
     
    Last edited: May 9, 2018
  13. Angélique
    Joined: Feb 2009
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    Location: Belgium ⇄ The Netherlands

    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    Marco, thanks for sharing your anchor test research, and the build info . . :)

    Like Diesel guy said in post #50, to also have a kedge does make sense, I don't know how to say it in Slovak, as I don't trust automatic translators on any jargon yet, so I'll post the definition from the Oxford living dictionaries, as well as the there given example sentences, since some of them tell about the applications...

    Definition of kedge in English:
    P.S. - Some more kedge info (in English): Wikipedia Anchor ---> Anchoring gear ---> Kedging
     
    Last edited: May 9, 2018
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  14. Bonaparte
    Joined: Sep 2017
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    Location: Koper, Slovenia EU

    Bonaparte Junior Member

    There is the last autocad laser cutting .dxf file for anchor storm with last modifications.
     

    Attached Files:

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  15. Dieselguy
    Joined: Apr 2018
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    Location: Scotland

    Dieselguy Junior Member

    Hello, as I undestand it, A kedge anchor would be deployed to yer stern, more than possibly from a dinghy and would be used to pull you out of trouble if you hit a sandbank or ran aground in whatever shirt that happens
     
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