Anchor retrival

Discussion in 'All Things Boats & Boating' started by valvebounce, Jan 4, 2015.

  1. valvebounce
    Joined: Dec 2010
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    valvebounce Senior Member

    The seabeds where I fish vary from clingy mud,rocks and shale.
    I have witnessed people having trouble releasing their anchors off the bottom on a few occassions.
    I have a fairly lightweight 14ft fibreglass boat(planing hull)with a 6hp 2 stoke evinrude on it.My anchor is a 5kg plough anchor with about 10ft of chain.There is a drilled hole about 4" from the bottom of the anchor,and a drilled lug at the base.
    Is there a method of attaching a short cable from the top to the bottom and using this to run a link to the anchor rope,so when I change direction it will have a cantilever action to free the anchor?
     
  2. cmckesson
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    cmckesson Naval Architect

    One approach is to shackle the chain to the "other" hole, and then run it along the stock to the "primary" hole where you attach it with something breakable - perhaps a piece of string, or a nylon cable tie, etc.

    Then, in normal anchoring the hook will work as normal, but when you get directly above it and pull vertically, the cable tie breaks and you are retreiving the anchor "backwards" as desired.
     
  3. valvebounce
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    valvebounce Senior Member

    Thanks,I can see the principal of doing that.
    You have probably saved me having to buy a couple of replacement anchors.
    Once again,many thanks.
     
  4. Poida
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    Poida Senior Member

    That method of attaching an anchor is what you use to release kayak anchors. However kayaks are light compared to a boat and I feel, although not sure, that obtaining a breakable link in your anchor that won't break when the boats on it and will when you pull it.

    Maybe you could try driving the boat in the opposite direction, careful you don't wrap the rope around your prop, and twist the anchor to release the suction from the mud.

    Poida
     
  5. valvebounce
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    valvebounce Senior Member

    That is the normal procedure that is used,and it works most of the time.
    I can't really see the breakable link failing as the main strain is on the bottom of the anchor,and the tie strap simply straps the chain to the main body of the anchor.My boat is an open boat and twin skinned,and is quite light in weight,I can manouvere it about on my own on the trailer.It still needs a car to launch it though.
    Thanks for your reply. V
     
  6. gdavis
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    gdavis Junior Member

    hello valveb, depending on the type of anchor you can attach a retrieval line to the bottom of the anchor(business end) and the other end to a small float or buoy. Some anchors like bruce or cqr and rocna come with a hole for a retrieval line so its a pretty common practice. When it's time to go home for dinner you just pull up on the retrieval line and it unsets the anchor. Not to much slack on that line or it may tangle with the actual anchor rode but even if it does it will still pull it free for you.If your using a Danforth there's no reason you can't drill a hole in the angle stopper.Hope this helps............peace.........g
     
  7. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    George has my preferred method and the only really safe way in areas of difficult bottoms. The business end's line and a float (as he points out) do need to be about vertical, so it doesn't foul and it's an easy matter to pick up the float and haul the anchor up flukes first.
     
  8. valvebounce
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    valvebounce Senior Member

    Hello George,thanks for your reply,my anchor already has a drilled lug at the very bottom of it and a drilled hole 4" higher up from it.I suppose with both ropes paying out when the anchor is dropped they should be more or less equal in length,so a bit of judgement and practice will be needed to avoid tangles.
    Thanks once again for your reply.V
     
  9. whitepointer23

    whitepointer23 Previous Member

    We use anchors here that with a ring to attach the chain. When you drive forward over the anchor the ring slides along the shank and pulls the anchor flukes first. No need for extra ropes.
     
  10. valvebounce
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    valvebounce Senior Member

    Hello PAR,thanks for your reply,I can see your point,I suppose if enough slack is allowed on the float line to allow for the swells,then one could drift downtide slightly and pay out the main rope to suit.
    I suppose it would be a matter of choice according to the circumstances on the day,whether to return to the float to retrieve,or simply retrieve with the main rope.If the tide turns,then re-adjustment would probably be needed I imagine.
    Thanks again for your reply V
     
  11. valvebounce
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    valvebounce Senior Member

    Hello W,thanks for your reply,
    your method is what I was considering,but I can't picture the setup.My anchor has a slight taper on the main strut,so the ring would need to be big enough to go over the widest part,but there would be no stop on the top end to restrict the ring.How do you get over it,a big bolt through the main eye maybe?
     
  12. whitepointer23

    whitepointer23 Previous Member

    You could weld a length of 1/2 inch bar along the shank. Space it out 3/8 or so and put a shackle on instead of a ring . You will still get the same effect. While the boat is hanging off the anchor the rope is pulling it into the mud. Drive forward the shackle slides up to the fluke end and pops it out.
     
  13. valvebounce
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    valvebounce Senior Member

    I can see the principal,1/2"bar--3/8" clearance--sliding link.

    I suppose I could put a ring on the 1/2" bar prior to welding it on.

    Thanks for the idea. V
     
  14. cmckesson
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    cmckesson Naval Architect

    Combine the two...?

    Perhaps you can combine the two ideas: Shackle the chain to the "wrong" end as per the breakable-link idea. But instead of the breakable link, use the ring, rigidly shackled to the chain at the right distance from the bitter end.

    Ring keeps chain on shaft when pulling the "right" direction, allows chain to slide toward bitter end when pulling the "wrong" direction.

    Of course, chain will bunch up when pulling backwards, so I suspect it won't be as clean as the breakable link, but it should obviate any issues of how strong to make the tie.
     

  15. valvebounce
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    valvebounce Senior Member

    I think the two original ideas would work,but I can see like you say there could be problems with the chain bunching with the last method.
    Even with the slide bar fitted there would be no problems using either method.
    Thanks for your reply,and roll on spring. V
     
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