anchor or mooring depth

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by nimblemotors, Mar 13, 2012.

  1. mydauphin
    Joined: Apr 2007
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    mydauphin Senior Member

    By the way the above was for a 60' boat used as part of an emergency anchor for a hurricane. But for a 26 foot under regular conditions, buy a regular Claw 30lb anchor.
     
  2. nimblemotors
    Joined: Jun 2009
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    Location: Sacramento

    nimblemotors Senior Member

    A pipe with a water jet and screw them in is what I've read.
    The difficultly as I see it is getting the boat to stay right over the anchor site to maintain the connection to the drill pipe and maintain downward pressure.

    As I understand it, these anchors are worth the effort to put in even if just overnight, I've read too many stories of boats getting loose.
    That is a disaster waiting to happen if always anchored out as I plan to do.
    BTW, my new boat is currently 34ft and I plan to make it bigger.

    I have still not been able to see charts for the sea of cortez, but all indications are 10ft of depth to anchor isn't going to be a problem,
    so the drilling rig won't need to be real big.

     
  3. WestVanHan
    Joined: Aug 2009
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    WestVanHan Not a Senior Member

    He can joke about subs...
     
  4. CatBuilder

    CatBuilder Previous Member

    Just as a data point, I've anchored out overnight, with normal plow type anchors, somewhere around 2,500 times and haven't dragged once. That's with 4 different boats and 4 different anchor setups.


    That includes sitting out 2 tropical storms and countless straight line fronts.

    More advice for nimble: just go try it out and see with a used plow anchor sized for your boat. You will find you don't need to spend all that extra time and money.

    I took a look into driving screws myself many years back. Carrying the gear just wasn't viable on anything less than a ship. A better approach would be to just make your boat into a spud barge. Much more simple. Use aluminium spuds if possible to save weight and just drop them if you want to stay put.
     
  5. FAST FRED
    Joined: Oct 2002
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    FAST FRED Senior Member

    "A better approach would be to just make your boat into a spud barge. Much more simple. Use aluminium spuds if possible to save weight and just drop them if you want to stay put."

    I always thought the ideal cruising boat would be a hovercraft with both wet and air props , and a set of jacking spuds.

    In the "no anchoring, the rich folks want a clear view areas" the boat would simply be jacked above local power boat wake height ,and 2 blackballs hung in the rigging.

    "Sorry officer we are not anchored , just aground."

    FF
     
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  6. bntii
    Joined: Jun 2006
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    bntii Senior Member

    We talkin Helix moorings???

    No way these are anything but fixed, permanent moorings.

    I had one placed for my boat- 500 lbs of gear screwed to 26' under sea bed. All driven in by a heavy hydraulic motor mounted on a tall crane via barge stationary by stand of spuds.
     
  7. nimblemotors
    Joined: Jun 2009
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    nimblemotors Senior Member

    Clearly for a permanent mooring the weight of the equipment isn't an issue,
    and the depth and size of the anchor would be "overkill" for the largest boat one might attach to it. Also, little consideration is giving to removing it.

    An alternative is something like a drywall anchor, one that is a pipe that screws in and once deep enough, branches are spread out underneath. To remove, retract the branches and unscrew.
     
  8. hoytedow
    Joined: Sep 2009
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    hoytedow Carbon Based Life Form

    The amount of effort it takes to unscrew yourself is not necessarily proportional to the amount of work it took for you to screw yourself.
     
  9. pdwiley
    Joined: Jun 2008
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    pdwiley Senior Member

    Many, many, many men have found *that* out the hard way.....

    PDW
     
  10. Frosty

    Frosty Previous Member

    The first post with some usefull information.
     
  11. bntii
    Joined: Jun 2006
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    bntii Senior Member


    So you are now looking for the depth of water where you intend to set a permanent mooring?

    Go out to the site and sound it eh?
     
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  12. souljour2000
    Joined: Aug 2009
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    Location: SW Florida

    souljour2000 Senior Member

    I just anchored my 40-foot 18,200 lb vessel in the Calossahatchie River where there is literally 4-5 feet of muck minimum before you get into sand...any anchor with flukes or hell, even probably a mushroom,jet ski anchor,etc. becomes VERY difficult to dislodge within seconds...I know... one big mistake people make with moorings is not putting a snubber on there to absorb shock loads... PO of my boat who was out-of-state gave it away after it broke loose...It was on a municipal mooring ball and no snubber...46 mph gust took out what little slack there is and then proceeded to rip entire windlass out of the deck..causing chain to pay out and big hole in deck...which made dockmaster tell PO that boat had to be removed from city jurisdiction ASAP...hope that was illustrative...in short..."all chain and no snubber makes Jack screwed"...and especially at the mooring ball...btw..I just put down a couple danforths on 60 feet or so of rode ( 6.5 feet depth)...they are gonna be a *itch to raise this weekend....
     
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  13. nimblemotors
    Joined: Jun 2009
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    nimblemotors Senior Member

    Sea of Cortez:

    "Watch your anchoring. In virtually every location, we were anchoring on somewhat hard packed sand, and it would sometimes take two or three tries to get the hook to hold. As mentioned earlier, swimming the anchor line is a good idea"
     
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  14. Frosty

    Frosty Previous Member

    All these problems with anchoring !!! finding depth etc.

    Wouldnt it be great if there was like some boat hotels where you drove in and tied up. You could even get off and have water supply to wash off. You could even supply electricity to each and every boat for a small charge infinitely less that the damage you could do you your or worse someone elses boat.

    Dont tell me you like anchoring out, -----its money.
     

  15. BPL
    Joined: Dec 2011
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    BPL Senior Member

    It's the solitude.

    Where's your sense of adventure ;)
     
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