An education request

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by rubenova, Jun 7, 2013.

  1. rubenova
    Joined: Aug 2011
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    Location: Fidalgo Island, WA

    rubenova Junior Member

    I've had an idea to find out more about sail. While I love all boats, there has been an ignorance (on my part) t'ward sail. It is a little intimidating with all the sail rigs and hull designs. I am irritated by people that don't do fundamental research on the basics so I understand if y'all are irritated by my question. Where on earth do I start to find out about sailing? I'm looking for a first step or question to ask. I would like to think that open minded describes me, so have at me, as it were. What questions should I be asking? Thank you in advance:cool:
     
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  2. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    The best thing you can do is go down to the local sailing club and ask to crew on some boats. They're always looking for bodies to fill out the ranks and you'll quickly learn a lot about the process. Back this up with a few good books, such as "The Design of Sail Yachts" by Gutelle. It can be a little "thick" for the novice to get through, but you'll get a good primer. Also look into Ted Brewer's "Understanding Boat Design" as a basic introduction into design.
     
  3. Tad
    Joined: Mar 2002
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    Tad Boat Designer

    Even before going out to crew, get a couple of books on the subject and at least glance through them.....

    Sailing for Dummies and Royce's Sailing Illustrated are a good start.
     
  4. rubenova
    Joined: Aug 2011
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    rubenova Junior Member

    That's what I was looking for, thanks all
     
  5. Ike
    Joined: Apr 2006
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    Ike Senior Member

    Everson is near Bellingham. There is a sailing school in Bellingham.
    http://boatingisfun.org/ ( A US Power Squadron. They teach boating and sailing. You don't have to be a member to take the course) )
    Also a sailing school, http://www.sanjuansailing.com/sailingsch.htm

    Western Washington University has a sailing team on Lake Whatcom http://wwusailing.com/

    Look around, ask questions, sailors are always enthusiastic and eager to promote their sport.
     
  6. sharpii2
    Joined: May 2004
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    sharpii2 Senior Member

    You can check out the article in Wikipedia under 'Sailing'. It is quite descriptive and gives you the basics.

    Being a self taught sailor myself, I found little of what was available much use in teaching teaching myself how to sail.

    I'm thinking of writing a very small booklet on the most rudimentary techniques.

    You don't need to know a lot to get started and it's a whole lot easier than learning to swim or learning to ride a bicycle.
     
  7. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Sailing is quite intuitive initially, though it does help if you have someone with you, to explain stuff. Sailing well enough to beat other guys, in similar boats, in a race, is another mater and takes years of practice and experience. For the casual sailor, a day or two of basic instruction, will offer all the things you need to know, to stay out of trouble. With this, experience builds confidence and you'll get better in time. A "Sailing for Dummys" book or other primer might offer some stuff for you to mull over, but on the water, practical exposure is the fastest and more enjoyable method.
     
  8. tspeer
    Joined: Feb 2002
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    tspeer Senior Member

    I'll second Royce's Sailing Illustrated. It's what I used to teach myself about sailing. Look for it in second-hand book stores. It's one of those books you can just pick up, open anywhere, and learn something new.
     
  9. WhiteDwarf
    Joined: Jun 2011
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    WhiteDwarf White Dwarf

    Respectfully, I would encourage you to embrace the terminology of sailing. Do not mistake it for an affectation, it is a technical extension of the language, an genuinely respected by most knowledgeable sailors.

    To be able to specifically refer to a sheet, brace, halyard etc, instead of "that rope" will make you a much more acceptable novice crew. In fact, it adds to your safety and the safety of those sailing with you. You will therefore learn faster and more enjoyably.

    Good luck
     
  10. Petros
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    Petros Senior Member


  11. rubenova
    Joined: Aug 2011
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    rubenova Junior Member

    Thanks again. Looking forward to a new hobby.
    cheers!
     
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