Aluminum tube sectioned mast

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by Onefish, Jan 29, 2020.

  1. Onefish
    Joined: Oct 2019
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    Location: Pennsylvania

    Onefish Junior Member

    I'd be reliant on finding one that is a two piece which would need a bit of luck. However, I did find a German site that sells hobie parts which has a kit for doing this. It runs about $200 but it would really simplify the project.
     
  2. Onefish
    Joined: Oct 2019
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    Location: Pennsylvania

    Onefish Junior Member

    21 feet, diagonally.
     
  3. jamez
    Joined: Feb 2007
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    Location: Auckland, New Zealand

    jamez Senior Member

    Scaled roughly off the web page image it looks as though the hounds are about 20 feet up the mast, so sticking with the 2 piece idea why not just make the second piece the top 6 feet? That way your shrouds, trap wires and jib halyard can terminate at the top of the main portion, which will fit in the garage. You would still need some sort of sleeve/plug arrangement to slot it in the top, but I don't think it would need to be as strong as if it were in the middle of the mast. An external main halyard would be KISS on such a set up.

    Thinking further; I wouldn't even necessarily worry about a sail track for such a short length. You could terminate the bolt rope at the hounds and just haul the peak of the sail (it would probably need a length of dyneema sewn up the luff at this point) to the top of the extension. Tension the cunningham and off you go. The advantage of this is you could probably just use a piece of carbon tube for the mast extension, and if aesthetics are important add a foam fairing so it matches the alloy section. If the join ever fails it will look a bit silly, but shouldn't bring the rig down.
     
    Last edited: Jan 30, 2020
  4. Onefish
    Joined: Oct 2019
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    Location: Pennsylvania

    Onefish Junior Member

    That sounds like a great idea. I'll want to double check the figures for the height on the hounds/trapeze and go and measure my garage to be absolutely sure, but assuming the numbers work out, this may be the best way to do it.

    My only concern is getting a snug fit for the internal sleeve due to all of the rivets poking through the mast where the shrouds and trapeze connect, but I'm sure I can find some kind of workaround.
     
  5. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    gonzo Senior Member

    You can use those rivets to hold the lower side of the sleeve in place. The halyard tension will keep the upper section from sliding off.
     
  6. Onefish
    Joined: Oct 2019
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    Location: Pennsylvania

    Onefish Junior Member

    That is a really good idea. I think is still want to use a cotter pin on the top section to prevent it from twisting independently of the bottom section.
     
  7. trip the light fandango
    Joined: Apr 2018
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    Location: Rhyll Phillip Island Victoria Australia

    trip the light fandango Senior Member

    This is idea appeals to me if the 20 ft mast be made to fit into the garage diagonally that is 21ft..?
    The extra buoyancy from foam which could be shaped to resemble a wingmast and the light weight of carbon may add to performance and help avoid full capsize ..
     

  8. Onefish
    Joined: Oct 2019
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    Location: Pennsylvania

    Onefish Junior Member

    Emailed Richard and he suggested possibly making the joint between the spreaders and hounds due to that spot on the mast being stronger but less under stress. He mentioned diamonds, though I wasn't aware that the H16 had diamond stays.
     
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