Aluminum sheet and plate in metric sizes

Discussion in 'Metal Boat Building' started by Daniel Lance, May 5, 2009.

  1. Daniel Lance
    Joined: Feb 2006
    Posts: 3
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Bayboro, NC

    Daniel Lance New Member

    Does anyone know of any Aluminum Suppliers in eastern Canada that stock marine grade ( 5086 or 5083 ) sheet and plate ? All the Suppliers I have contacted in the eastern and southern U.S. do not .
     
  2. marshmat
    Joined: Apr 2005
    Posts: 4,127
    Likes: 148, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 2043
    Location: Ontario

    marshmat Senior Member

    Hi Daniel,

    Is there a particular reason you must have metric-dimensioned plate?

    I cannot think of many situations where it would be particularly problematic to substitute an inch-dimensioned plate of very nearly the same thickness. For instance, 1/4" plate ought to be an OK substitute for 6mm in most applications, since it is only 0.014" thicker than 6mm plate.
     
  3. Daniel Lance
    Joined: Feb 2006
    Posts: 3
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Bayboro, NC

    Daniel Lance New Member

    Matt,
    Thanks for the reply. I bought a set of plans from Mike Waller of Queensland Australia for a 13m Aluminum Powercat. The boat is designed using metric thickness sheet, plates angle flat bar and square tube. Bare weight of just the hull is around 6526Kg. It is my belief that deviating from "as designed" could incur a weight penalty at best and possible structural deficiencies at worst. I really need to achieve the performance the architect intended.
    Daniel
     
  4. Luckless
    Joined: Mar 2009
    Posts: 158
    Likes: 7, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 105
    Location: PEI, Canada

    Luckless Senior Member

    Contact the architect and talk to them about it. Often sheet metal is produced with a fairly large variance from the stated thickness, so talk to the architect about the impact it will have.

    At the very least any decent sized metal yard should be able to hook you up if you're willing to pay a little extra to get stuff they don't normally stock.
     
  5. Daniel Lance
    Joined: Feb 2006
    Posts: 3
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Bayboro, NC

    Daniel Lance New Member

    Matt and Luckless,
    Thank you both for the advice. I will contact the architect and ask his opinion. It is my desire to do the best job possible when constructing my boat and not do anything I will regret later.
     
  6. Clifford Barney
    Joined: Aug 2009
    Posts: 1
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Manassas, VA

    Clifford Barney New Member

    I have a large quantity (10 tons) of aluminum 5086 from a U.S. Navy warship in Louisiana. I don't know the thickness yet, but we're scheduled to begin breaking it up next week. There is the potential for cut-to-spec for DIY boat builders. Contact me if interested.
     

  7. Guest62110524

    Guest62110524 Previous Member

    there will be almost no weight addition at all, your 5/32 is almost same as our 4mm, yout 3/16 a touch thinner than our 5, your 1/4 is 6.25mm and so on, one inch is 25.4m, you can work it from there
    in other words, 5/32 is 3.9 mm, ten thou under
    you are better with 1/8th than 3mm. it is .125 inch thicker and will work with less distortion
     
Loading...
Similar Threads
  1. Suspended Animations
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    1,620
  2. Kemmer
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    331
  3. cthippo
    Replies:
    20
    Views:
    810
  4. Ry Scott
    Replies:
    40
    Views:
    1,059
  5. jwells11
    Replies:
    58
    Views:
    2,080
  6. Pen Gwyn
    Replies:
    37
    Views:
    1,060
  7. fpjeepy05
    Replies:
    50
    Views:
    2,942
  8. Shawn_Laughlin
    Replies:
    5
    Views:
    1,200
  9. DCockey
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    1,071
  10. DCockey
    Replies:
    8
    Views:
    1,515
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.