aluminium tender or RIB?

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by expedition, Sep 23, 2009.

  1. mark775

    mark775 Guest

    That is going to be the heaviest thing that you can build, IMO, the pvc tubes have no purpose but force your hull shape and take up space. Are you thinking that the tubes will float and are therefore safer - like a "safeboat" ( http://www.safeboats.com/default/index.php )? I think they, too, are expensive, heavy, take up space, but without some of the advantage of an inflatable (store them in a small space with tubes deflated and never need a fender). Our Coast Guard and Auxiliary have a bunch of those here and when they need space to pick up victims they don't have it. Fun for four Coasties to play around on tho (with huge horsepower). In effect, our Coast Guard has a $70,000 boat that can do about the same job as this;
    H76C.jpg
    ...But looks cooler


    I suppose that you have already decided against a panga?
     
  2. expedition
    Joined: Jun 2007
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    expedition Thorwald Westmaas

    Well, if you look at my original post, you 'll understand that in that capacity range I would never would have the advantage of the inflatable you mention: less space requirements with deflated tubes.

    Pangas are heavy, hard to get in, can't be customized like alum., no forward ramp, need a collar too.

    The Safeboats seem to be marketed mostly to an institution that is used to paying too much. But, I'm sure they do the job.
     
  3. Jack B
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    Jack B New Member

    the pvc tubes have no purpose but force your hull shape and take up space.

    We use HDPE for the collar and the collar is formed to fit the shape of the hull, not the other way round. The collar is reserve buoyancy, but helps stability massively when loaded. The boats are no heavier than a conventional commercial RIB, but our hulls are designed to take 14 g impacts. They can self drain with a 1200 kg on deck, have very efficient hulls with good speed to HP ratio.
    Our website has some pictures of assembly sequence and video of the boats.
    Hope this helps some of you.
    Thorwald has an problem that we have wondered about for a couple of years, how to make a small cat type buoyant collar boat. It will be interesting to see if it can be solved in a satisfactory way.
     
  4. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    Jaja,
    I LOVE those "Titanic claims" as I call them, but thats US mentality.

    But those boats from Flugga look quite good! And I think I´ll give them a shot when I build my Explorer. And I do´nt need the ramp....................;)

    Richard
     
  5. Ad Hoc
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    Ad Hoc Naval Architect

    Have to agree with Richard (as almost always :) )
    The America 'standards' produce, very heavy and over engineered boats compared to European ones, much more conservative too, generally.
    Every boat I've even been involved with, when a design was 'converted' for the US market/client, we added approx 20% to the full load weight, to account for all the over heavy and over engineered products that must be used, thanks to the Jones act (no protectionism,...yeah right!!!).
     
  6. expedition
    Joined: Jun 2007
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    expedition Thorwald Westmaas

    >we added approx 20% to the full load weight,
    >to account for all the over heavy and over
    >engineered products that must be used

    Not just the products. The people too :) :) !
     
  7. Ad Hoc
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    Ad Hoc Naval Architect

    No comment :p:p
     
  8. expedition
    Joined: Jun 2007
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    expedition Thorwald Westmaas

    cost of new build

    Richard - and others,

    I'd like to pickup on that issue and some more feedback.

    We plan to spend about $ 5.5 million on the conversion and I've seen estimates of the value from $ 5 to $ 20 million.

    I'd love to get some feedback on what you'd think the cost of newbuilt would be or at least - easier to estimate - the market value. The specs. of the final result of our conversion are on our website (top menu right side).

    The finishing will be more passengership like than mega yacht but a nice passenger ship. It will be converted under L/R rules (special service craft) and we see to get 95% compliance with the MCA LY2 code and most SOLAS requirements.

    She'll be around 470 GT.
     
  9. pistnbroke
    Joined: Jan 2009
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    Location: Noosa.Australia where god kissed the earth.

    pistnbroke I try

    have a look at a Stabicraft ...rib made in aluminium ..they export all over the world ...min 7 sealed compartments
     
  10. decoguy
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    decoguy Junior Member

    If you are serious about diving, get a RIB as they are much easier to dive from, entry is easier, (just roll backwards into the water) and they are more stable when at rest in the water.

    Get a RIB with an aluminium bottom, not fibreglass, and beaching is no longer an issue. Another option is to get rigid metal tubes such as the following link:

    http://www.oceancraft.com.au/
     
  11. expedition
    Joined: Jun 2007
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    expedition Thorwald Westmaas

    Thanks guys,

    I'll check out those links. Yes. We'll be doing diving and I agree entry from a RIB is very easy but most of our trips will not be diving and require beaching.

    To serve the divers, we are thinking about putting a smaller collar/fender around and have doors on both sides to get out (or in) the water. We like, however, the cat setup as it will give great stability and a nice forward ramp.
     
  12. Jack B
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    Jack B New Member

    Jack B

    Apex 1, We would be glad to give you any info you need for your next boat.

    Pistnbroke, Stabicraft have looked over what we do, and liked it. They build quite neat boats themselves.

    Decoguy, If you look at the police boat on our website www.fluggaboats.co.uk you will see that she is rigged with a dive ladder that swings down from the A frame. This boat is used exclusively by the dive team and is currently being looked over by other police units. Main reasons for purchasing, virtually no maintenance, long life components and lots of room for kit.

    Any comments are of interest to us, even negative ones.

    Thanks, jack@fluggaboats.co.uk
     
  13. hoytedow
    Joined: Sep 2009
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    hoytedow Wood Butcher

    HaHa! I'm trying to lose weight. Lost 10 kg's so far this year.:p
     
  14. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    Welcome Thorwald,
    in my former comment I did reckon the cost of a comparable newbuilt at around 15 to 20m $ and was thinking of around 8 to 10% of annual cost. Of course she will not be converted to megayacht standard that would be senseless, you still have a trawler hull. A pretty good workboat finish with megayacht accommodation (look) is as good in this case.
    Market value is not as easy to estimate as a newbuild price! The market is narrow, even in better times, and not every boat finds a buyer with the same enthusiasm as the first client had. I have seen mega´s loosing 60% value at their launch. And others selling substantially above the original purchase price after 25 years in service (private). Many conversions unfortunately end up in the former category just because they ARE already a couple of years old when they are converted. And, obviously workhorses. So, all the estimations you have had already can be right.
    Keeping them in class pays Imho.
    To the annual cost I would like to say, that impressively a travelling boat is cheaper than a "docksitter" (including fuel cost).

    Regards
    Richard
     

  15. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    Hi Jack,
    it would be nice if there was any substantial info about the 6m boat on your site! But clicking it leads to a white screen!?

    Regards
    Richard
     
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