aluminium sanding with grinder and wax??

Discussion in 'Metal Boat Building' started by shakey78, Jan 18, 2010.

  1. shakey78
    Joined: Sep 2009
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    shakey78 Junior Member

    Now I read in a magazine the other day that when they sand the welds down they use wax with the grinder sanding disc??? is this true if so why and what type of wax do they use and whats the benefit from using it any help would be great
     
  2. alan white
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    alan white Senior Member

    Aluminum in particular clogs files, sand paper, and anything else that abrades it. The sanding material fills up with aluminum (which heats up momentarily and becomes tar-like in consistancy) long before the grit wears out.
    I'd guess that coating discs with wax allows the aluminum to fly off in the same way steel would. I've never heard of it, but apparantly someone put their thinking cap on.
     
  3. mark775

    mark775 Guest

  4. shakey78
    Joined: Sep 2009
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    shakey78 Junior Member

    Well I gave it a go last nite welded up some Ali and sanded down with wax and wow what a smoother sanding job!! After all these years not using wax only on my saw now on my Sanding disc. Huge difference
     
  5. mark775

    mark775 Guest

    I have thrown away a few die-grinder bits for being too lazy to go get the wax! Glad it worked well for you.
     
  6. Bigfoot1
    Joined: Jul 2009
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    Bigfoot1 Junior Member

    We would never use wax on an aluminum sanding disc or die grinder bit, Yes certainly there is less build up but if you should get any wax on an edge that needs to be welded (or painted) you would have to do a superlative job degreasing the edge to get a 100% weld.
    The method is to use a very coarse grit for sanding or grinding discs, say 40 for first removal then down to 60. You will get a very smooth finish, Use a rigid disc for fast removal then a flapper style for finer work.
    I employ about 6 guys who are grinding and welding aluminum 8 hours a day, we dont own any wax.
     
  7. shakey78
    Joined: Sep 2009
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    shakey78 Junior Member

    I only use after all welding was done, and cleaned up just before painting it seams to work good for my job seams to sand a lot quicker and with less effort, but I could see your point if you need to weld and the wax is all over it will keep that in mind when I do my welding and sanding.
     
  8. welderbob
    Joined: Nov 2009
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    welderbob Junior Member

    I want to be your disc salesman. A little wax goes along way. Your right, you don't want to fill the weld joint with wax. A little touch to the disc makes it cut twice as fast and last many times longer.

    Welderbob
     
  9. Frosty

    Frosty Previous Member

    Candle wax? Floor wax,Johnson furniture wax I don,t have welding specialist shops here.

    But if its not going to be rewelded and its a non painted part, perhaps it could be considered.

    Would it help cutting Zincs in half with a 4 inch cutting wheel? Its damn near impossible --quicker with a coarse hacksaw.
     

  10. w4ck0
    Joined: May 2010
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    w4ck0 New Member

    just a normal bar of hand soap dose the trick!
     
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